World Cruise: Grand European Sojourn Voyage

Regent Seven Seas Cruises

Magnificent, impressive and awe-inspiring are excellent synonyms for grand, and you will need all of them to describe your Grand Voyage. Circumnavigate continents, cross the world's great oceans, explore a vast diversity of cultures and discover centuries of history, one leisurely day at a time.

All-Inclusive Cruise

  • All onboard gratuities

  • Select complimentary shore excursions**

  • Unlimited beverages, including fine wines and premium spirits served throughout the ship

  • In-suite refrigerator replenished daily with soft drinks, beer and bottled water

  • 24-Hour room service

  • No charge for specialty restaurants

  • Welcome bottle of Champagne

  • $100 Shipboard credit (per suite)††

Executive Member Benefit

  • Executive Members receive an annual 2% Reward, up to $1,000, on qualified Costco Travel purchases

  • Executive Members receive an additional $100 shipboard credit (per suite, not combinable with certain past-guest discounts)††

Costco Shop Card

  • Executive Members earn an annual 2% Reward on Costco Travel purchases

Sailing Itinerary

Note: Cruise itineraries are subject to change. Please verify ports and times directly with the cruise line.

Day 1Port of Call LisbonDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Lisbon is Portugal’s hilly, coastal capital city. From imposing São Jorge Castle, the view encompasses the old city’s pastel-colored buildings, Tagus Estuary and Ponte 25 de Abril suspension bridge. Nearby, the National Azulejo Museum displays 5 centuries of decorative ceramic tiles. Just outside Lisbon is a string of Atlantic beaches, from Cascais to Estoril.

Day 2Port of Call Porto Arrival 9:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Porto is the second largest city in Portugal. The greatest sites in Porto are its five bridges, three modern, two nineteenth century and all of them sensational. The valleys and tributaries that run along them form some of the most spectacular landscapes in the the country. The wealth that flowed into the city from the 15th century onward is evidenced throughout Porto. Trade in the commodities from Portugal’s newly claimed lands brought Brazilian gold and exotic woods to embellish Porto’s many elaborate churches and palaces. Prosperous merchants spent lavishly on paintings and the ever famous azulejos. The true fascination with Porto lies very much in the day-to-day life of the place, with its prosperous business core surrounded by well to do suburbs as well as depressed housing estates, tempered by a heart of cramped streets and ancient alleys wholly untouched by the planners. Porto is renowned for the great variety of light, fresh and often fizzy wines as well as the heavyweight Port wines. Vinho verde ‘sparkling wine’, is grown in the northwest. Country wines from the northeast are made in the area between the Spanish border to the north and east and four mountain ranges to the west. The Vinho verde region is best known for its slightly under-ripe wines, with a slightly sparkling character. They are mainly white, and the best are made from the alvarinho grape, as well as the azal, ljurerio and rabigato. Wines from the Douro region are beginning to be accepted as some of Portugal’s finest. Although excellent white wines are produced here, the area is best known for its great reds. The accommodations in Porto range from inexpensive rooms (south east of Sao Bento station) that will fit just about any budget to more expensive places around the city. They are generally a good value but in winter investing in a more expensive place with better facilities to counter the freezing cold is worth the a little extra.

Day 3Port of Call Villagarcia de Arosa Arrival 7:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Vilagarcía, capital of the Arousa Bay and natural harbour of Santiago de Compostela, has a population of almost 35.000 inhabitants, so it is the eighth city in Galicia. Because of its geographical characteristics, Vilagarcía has become a focus of attention for many people who choose this city to establish their residence (main, second or holiday one). And this is not by chance. Few cities can offer a situation and a climate as those that Vilagarcía enjoys, at the seaside and without extreme temperatures. The town also has harbour, railway station, thirty-minute distant airport, hospital, exhibition site, a rich historical and artistic patrimony, a gastronomy which is in the elite of Galicia, traditional business and chain stores, beach and yachting harbour –both with the Blue Flag conceded by the UE-, Green Flag awarding the sustainable development of the city, promenade, sports complex with swimming pool and athletics stadium, several gardens and parks, local Fiestas of Tourist Interest and an extensive and varied free-time, cultural and sports offer. This offer will soon be increased with an auditorium with room for almost one thousand people, designed by César Portela (National Award in Architecture). For all this reasons, Vilagarcía de Arousa is a perfect place to live quietly, with all the commodities of a city without its stress and with the chance of enjoying the free time offer of the main Galician cities with no need of great travelling. Definitely, it is a place with quality of life. For the same reasons, Vilagarcía is a perfect place to establish our centre if we want to have an unforgettable holiday in Galicia. Vilagarcía, whose Fiestas have been declared of Tourist Interest (San Roque procession, Water Festival, Carril’s Clam Festival, Naval Battle of fireworks, Craft Albariño Wine Festival...), is half-an-hour distant from Santiago (World Heritage) and from Vigo, with its free-time and shopping proposals; 25 kilometres away from Pontevedra, the provincial capital; 12 km. from Cambados (Albariño Wine Festival and historical area); 30 km. from O Grove (Shellfish Festival) and A Toxa (Grand Hotel and spa); 8 km. from Catoira (Viking Festival); 25 km. from Sanxenxo (centre of the Galician tourism); and just an hour away from Portugal by main road. Besides, it is easy in Vilagarcía to practice any kind of sport. The majority of hotels of the town have an agreement with the Golf Club of Meis (12 kilometres away), the first Galician public Golf Club, of which the Town Council is main partner. And Vilagarcía and its bay are a paradise for people fond of sailing and water sports. Nice climate, cordiality, exceptionally good situation, quality of life, historical heritage, gastronomy, leisure, yachting sports, urban beach, local Fiestas of Tourist Interest... all this and more is offered to the traveller by Vilagarcía, City of Arousa, Sea of Compostela.

Day 4Port of Call La Coruna Arrival 7:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Situated beside the Atlantic Ocean, A Coruna is a historic city whose history has maintained close links with its old fishing and commercial port. The peninsula on which the Old City stands also contains the Tower of Hercules, one of the symbols of the city, which is an interesting Romanesque collection of streets, squares and medieval churches. The Aquarium Finisterrae, the Domus and the Science Museum are some of the places that show the more modern, recreational side of the provincial capital, which offers one of its most beautiful facets in the wide beaches of Riazor and Orzán. All this is completed with cuisine recognised throughout the country, marked by the excellence of its seafood and meats coming from the inland parts of the province. The Aquarium Finisterrae, the Domus and the Science Museum are some of the places that show the more modern, recreational side of the provincial capital, which offers one of its most beautiful facets in the wide beaches of Riazor and Orzán. All this is completed with cuisine recognised throughout the country, marked by the excellence of its seafood and meats coming from the inland parts of the province. The harbour has always been the scene of some of the most important historical events in the city, like the defeat of the English privateer Francis Drake in 1589 thanks to the resistance of the people of Coruña, led by the heroine María Pita. The city's most important civil buildings also deserve a visit. The City Hall is situated in the Plaza de María Pita, the nerve centre of the city. It is an elegant, monumental building built at the beginning of the 20th century, characterised by its porches and galleries and by three towers finished with attractive cupolas. Another sight not to be missed in the centre of A Coruna is the San Carlos Garden, declared a Historic-Artistic site. The walls of the fortress of San Carlos, which dates from 1843, house this unusual space in which the Archive of the Kingdom of Galicia is based and whose centre is presided over by the tomb of Sir John Moore, a British general who died in 1809 during the battle of Elvina. Surrounding the Old City is the coastal area, where A Coruña mixes the traditional and the modern. Beside the port in the Avenida de la Marina, are the typical houses with white glazed galleries (19thC), architectural elements making up one of the best known features of A Coruna and which earned it the name of 'Glass City'. The Castle of San Anton, at one end of the harbour area, was built at the end of the 16th century with a defensive character and later altered in the 18th. It currently houses the Provincial Archaeological Museum, which takes an interesting journey through Galician prehistory using various pieces of metalwork, objects and tools corresponding to the hill fort culture. On the long Coruna promenade there are other outstanding cultural opportunities. The Acuarium Finisterrae, situated near the Tower of Hercules, houses one of the largest aquariums in Spain, and includes rooms with interactive exhibitions related to the sea. Human beings are the central theme of Domus or the House of Man, located in a futuristic building designed by the architect Arata Isozaki. Inside, various interactive rooms show man from a multidisciplinary point of view. The promenade finally leads to the wide Riazor and Orzan, beaches, the main areas for the people of A Coruna to relax. The tour of the museums can be completed by visiting the Science Museum, situated in Santa Margarita Park, one of the provincial capital's most important green areas. Its outstanding feature is the Planetarium, while its permanent exhibition approaches scientific, technological and natural principles in an interactive way. The cuisine of La Coruna brings together the best of the coast and the interior. From the coast comes excellent seafood: small crabs, barnacles, spider crabs, Norway lobster, etc. Succulent recipes based on fish are also cooked, such as angler fish stew, Galician-style hake (with onion, garlic and carrot) or griddled sole. Pasties serve as a transition to the interior as they can be made either with fish and shellfish or with meat. As for meat, pork can be used to make the famous pork shoulder with parsnip tops, while Galician beef is protected with a Denomination of Origin. Any of the magnificent Galician wines that have a Denomination of Origin (Monterrei, Ribeira Sacra, Ribeiro, Rías Baixas and Valdeorras) can be used to accompany these dishes. And, for dessert, there is the famous Santiago cake (with almonds, sugar and flour). Around the provincial capital you can visit interesting places like Betanzos, declared a Historic-Artistic Site, Santiago de Compostela, capital of Galicia and World Heritage City, or Ferrol.

Day 5Port of Call Bilbao Arrival 10:00amDeparture 11:00pm

Overview

Bilbao, city and seaport in northern Spain, on the Nervión River, near the Bay of Biscay, capital of Vizcaya Province, in the Basque Country autonomous region. Bilbao consists of an old section, on the right bank of the Nervión, and a modern section, dating from the late 19th century, on the left bank. Several bridges connect the old and new sections. Several railroads and highways and an international airport serve Bilbao. A subway system opened in 1995. One of the major industrial centers of Spain, the city is within a large iron-ore mining region. The chief industries are shipbuilding and the manufacture of cement, chemicals, foodstuffs, iron and steel, machinery, paper, and textiles. Bilbao is an important seaport, and iron ore, cereal grains, and wine are major exports. The chief imports are coal and timber. The Semana Grande is a major bullfighting event held in Bilbao each August. The city has several churches, among them the Gothic Church of Santiago, which dates from the 14th century. It also has a number of museums, including a collection of archaeological finds relating to the history of the Basques. In October 1997 the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, with its collection of modern art, opened on Bilbao's waterfront. Among the city's educational institutions is the University of Deusto, a Jesuit university founded in 1886. The author and philosopher Miguel de Unamuno y Jugo was born in Bilbao.

Day 6Port of Call Saint-Jean-de-Luz Arrival 7:00amDeparture 4:00pm

Overview

Saint-Jean-de-Luz is a fishing town at the mouth of the Nivelle river, in southwest France’s Basque country. The Saint-Jean-Baptiste Church, where King Louis XIV married Marie-Therese of Spain in 1660, has a gilded baroque altarpiece and wooden galleries. The turreted Maison Louis XIV is a museum that recreates 17th-century domestic life with period furniture. It includes the King’s Chamber, where Louis XIV slept.

Day 7Port of Call Montoir-de-Bretagne Arrival 10:00am

Overview

Montoir-de-Bretagne is a commune in the Loire-Atlantique department in western France.

Day 8Port of Call Montoir-de-BretagneDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Montoir-de-Bretagne is a commune in the Loire-Atlantique department in western France.

Day 9Port of Call CONCARNEAU Arrival 7:00amDeparture 9:00pm

Overview

Concarneau is a commune in the Finistere department of Brittany in north-western France. Concarneau is bordered to the west by the Baie de La Foret.

Day 10Port of Call Brest Arrival 7:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Brest is a port city in Brittany, in northwestern France, bisected by the Penfeld river. It’s known for its rich maritime history and naval base. At the mouth of the Penfeld, overlooking the harbor, is the National Navy Museum, housed in the medieval Château de Brest. Across the river stands Tour Tanguy, a medieval tower. To the northeast are the National Botanical Conservatory and the Oceanopolis aquarium.

Day 11Port of Call Saint Peter Port Arrival 9:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

St Peter Port, Guernsey's main town, is built into a steep valley leading down to the harbour, with spectacular views across to Alderney and the other islands. It has the most sheltered anchorage in the Channel Island and it has been a haven and eventually a harbour for over 2000 years. St Peter Port has been rated amongst the 50 most historic towns in England and Wales. Despite the predominance of international banks based here, the town has managed to retain its 17th century charm. The granite buildings now occupied by shops were once the homes of the town's wealthy residence and the High Street still has its original cobbles. The town was put on the map in 1855 when Victor Hugo, exiled from France, made his home at Hauteville House. Here he wrote Les Miserables. Renoir also painted a number of his masterpieces here. Several guided walking tours of St Peter Port begin at the Tourist Information Bureau during the summer months.

Day 12Port of Call Honfleur Arrival 7:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Visiting Honfleur means, travelling through history in the heart of an exceptionally preserved site. Our old maritime city is very wellknown for its old dock but we are inviting you to experiment its particular atmosphere walking through its old narrow paved streets. Honfleur is certainly proud of its prestigious past but the city is also definitely turned toward future. It is a dynamic harbour offering an increasingly number of cultural activities: exhibitions, concerts and traditional feast such as the Shrimp feast or the Russian Film Festival. Take the time to discover Honfleur.

Day 13Port of Call Zeebrugge Arrival 10:00amDeparture 11:00pm

Overview

Linked with Brugge, its historic metropolis, by a 7.5 mile canal, Zeebrugge is a seaside resort looking to the future. The international port, jutting far out into the sea, doesn't prevent holidaymakers from frolicking on the fine little sandy beach. On the sea front, hotels and cafés give tourists their warmest welcome. Being Belgium's leading fishing port, Zeebrugge has quite a lot of fishmongers' shops. Besides being a passenger port with regular ferry services between the United Kingdom and the continent, Zeebrugge also has an attractive marina which can accommodate some 100 vessels. Zeebrugge also enjoys a very convenient geographical location, just a few miles away from beautiful Brugge, the fashionable sea resort of Knokke, and the picturesque village of Lissewege. During the summer season the beach invites to (sun) bathing, playing and relaxing. Autumn and winter are the right seasons to take a firm walk along the seaside. On the western dam, a promenade reaches far out into the open sea. At the foot of the dam the "St. George Memorial" commemorates the Battle of Zeebrugge (23.4.1918) on which occasion the British Royal Navy finally put the German U-Boot base out of action. The City Community House on Marktplein is the seat of the city administration. The premises also have a socio-cultural function.

Day 14Port of Call Antwerp Arrival 7:00am

Overview

Antwerp is the largest city in Flanders, the northern part of Belgium. Some 60% of the ten million Belgians are Flemings. They speak Dutch. Like their French and German-speaking compatriots they have their own parliament and government. The capital of Flanders is Brussels, also capital of federal Belgium and the heart of Europe. The city's 468 717 inhabitants (as recorded on 02/2004) live in a territory, which covers approximately 22,076 hectares. The city is located between latitude 51°13'16' and 4°23'60' eastern longitude. It has a moderate maritime climate.

Day 15Port of Call AntwerpDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Antwerp is the largest city in Flanders, the northern part of Belgium. Some 60% of the ten million Belgians are Flemings. They speak Dutch. Like their French and German-speaking compatriots they have their own parliament and government. The capital of Flanders is Brussels, also capital of federal Belgium and the heart of Europe. The city's 468 717 inhabitants (as recorded on 02/2004) live in a territory, which covers approximately 22,076 hectares. The city is located between latitude 51°13'16' and 4°23'60' eastern longitude. It has a moderate maritime climate.

Day 16Port of Call Amsterdam Arrival 10:00am

Overview

Amsterdam is the Netherlands’ capital, known for its artistic heritage, elaborate canal system and narrow houses with gabled facades, legacies of the city’s 17th-century Golden Age. Its Museum District houses the Van Gogh Museum, works by Rembrandt and Vermeer at the Rijksmuseum, and modern art at the Stedelijk. Cycling is key to the city’s character, and there are numerous bike paths.

Day 17Port of Call AmsterdamDeparture 4:00pm

Overview

Amsterdam is the Netherlands’ capital, known for its artistic heritage, elaborate canal system and narrow houses with gabled facades, legacies of the city’s 17th-century Golden Age. Its Museum District houses the Van Gogh Museum, works by Rembrandt and Vermeer at the Rijksmuseum, and modern art at the Stedelijk. Cycling is key to the city’s character, and there are numerous bike paths.

Day 18Port of Call Tilbury Arrival 7:00amDeparture 9:00pm

Overview

Tilbury, town and port in Thurrock Borough, Essex, eastern England. It is situated about 35 km (22 mi) east of London on the north bank of the River Thames. A monastery was established at Tilbury by the Northumbrian bishop St Cedd (Cedda) in the middle of the 7th century. The settlement is mentioned in the Domesday book as Tilaburg, which means "Tila's fortified place". Since the 15th century Tilbury has been a ferry point for passengers crossing the Thames to Gravesend in Kent. In the 16th century Henry VIII built a fort at Tilbury to guard the Thames estuary. In 1588, when the Spanish Armada was threatening England, Elizabeth I famously addressed the royal troops assembled at Tilbury. The docks for which Tilbury is famous were built between 1884 and 1886. In the 1960s Tilbury docks became a containerized port and the Port of London's principal container centre, causing a decline in the Docklands of London.

Day 19 Cruising
Day 20Port of Call Edinburgh/Newhaven Arrival 7:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Edinburgh is Scotland's compact, hilly capital. It has a medieval Old Town and elegant Georgian New Town with gardens and neoclassical buildings. Looming over the city is Edinburgh Castle, home to Scotland’s crown jewels and the Stone of Destiny, used in the coronation of Scottish rulers. Arthur’s Seat is an imposing peak in Holyrood Park with sweeping views, and Calton Hill is topped with monuments and memorials.

Day 21Port of Call Invergordon Arrival 9:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Invergordon is a town whose history stretches back through two World Wars and has now developed into a centre for oilrig refurbishment and maintenance. It is also a major port of call for cruise liners, being the only deep water port in the area, 40 liners, with 21,000 visitors from all over the world, berthed in 2004. Ideally situated in the centre of the eastern Highlands, the town's High Street has recently been given a face lift with coloured granite blocks, speed controllers, a new restaurant and a mural has been painted on the Albyn Housing building. There are many places to eat, providing quick take-away food right through to a quality country house hotel and restaurant just inland from the town, Indian and Chinese food is also available as an alternative to the more traditional fayre. There is an Arts Centre, a Leisure and Sports Club, with swimming pool and an 18 hole golf course on the outskirts of town.

Day 22Port of Call Lerwick Arrival 7:00amDeparture 4:00pm

Overview

Lerwick, the lively capital of Shetland, centres around its important and busy harbour, particularly during the summer months, when yachts, cruise liners, private yachts and motor cruisers arrive from ports all around the North Atlantic. Lerwick has a population of around 7,500, approximately one third of Shetland's total population. The shops, pubs, restaurants, hotels and guesthouses bustle all year with locals, visiting businessmen, tourists and seafarers. A mix of old and new, the town offers visitors a range of things to do and see. Places of interest include Clickimin Broch - an outstanding example of Bronze Age and Iron Age architecture; Fort Charlotte - built in 1665 and having good views from the gunports; the Bod of Gremista - an 18th century fishing booth; and the picture-postcard Lodberries - old merchants' houses with their own piers. The Museum has a fascinating collection of artefacts illustrating Shetland's history. Elsewhere special exhibitions depict Shetland tradition and crafts - knitting, spinning, lace-making, fiddle music and Up Helly Aa.

Day 23Port of Call Ullapool Arrival 7:00amDeparture 2:00pm

Overview

Ullapool is full of souvenir/craft shops, guest houses and hotels, it bustles all day long in summertime with people arriving off the ferry from Stornoway on Lewis or waiting for the next one. The town has a leisure centre with sports facilities and swimming pool, library, grocery shop, butcher's shop, chemist's (pharmacy/drug store), Safeway supermarket, post office and petrol stations. There is a branch of the Royal Bank of Scotland here too. Ullapool is a great centre for hillwalking (see below) and it's an ideal base for touring the beautiful landscape of the north-west Highlands. You might be able to spot some deer around here. Golf course - 9 holes split over the shores of Loch Broom and Ullapool River (telephone 01854 613 323). Tennis courts too. Founded by the British Fisheries Society in 1788, the town now sees more Eastern European factory ships than Scottish herring boats. The Ullapool Museum in the old church in West Argyle Street won the Scottish Museum of the Year award for 1996. The church was restored in 1995 and now has an audio-visual display about the local area and people with a commentary available in several languages. Some of the historical material which illustrates all aspects of Highland life came from the exhibition organised for the town's bicentenary in 1988. This includes old books, ships ledgers and records detailing the emigrants who set off for Canada and New Zealand.

Day 24Port of Call Belfast Arrival 7:00amDeparture 10:00pm

Overview

Belfast offers the buzz and vibrancy of a capital city whilst being a gateway to the rural retreat of Northern Ireland. At the head of Belfast Lough, the city is compact and easy to get around, whether by car or on foot. Like all capital cities, Belfast offers a wide range of accommodation to suit all pockets, from cosy B&Bs around the university, to well appointed riverside self-catering establishments, to city centre boutique hotels.
Belfast is teeming with a multitude of stylish bars, gourmet restaurants, trendy clubs and some of the best shopping in the UK. Visitors can enjoy traditional Irish music in a local pub or dance the night away to the latest vibes – the choice is yours!
The birthplace of the Titanic, Belfast’s industrial heritage has shaped a city steeped in culture, portrayed at its best at the Ulster Museum, City Hall, the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum and the many buildings still standing. The many parks, gardens and galleries offer a perfect haven to relax.
Within a couple of hours of Belfast, visitors can marvel at the Giant’s Causeway, walk the Mountains of Mourne, fish in Fermanagh or visit the many picturesque villages in Northern Ireland - a perfect location to discover the rest of Northern Ireland!

Day 25 Dun Laoghaire Arrival 7:00amDeparture 9:00pm
Day 26Port of Call Waterford/Ireland Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Waterford is the oldest city in Ireland. A walled city of Viking origins, it retains much of it's medieval character together with the graceful buildings from its 18th century expansion. The parameters of the 10th century settlement can be clearly identified in The Viking Triangle. Reginald's Tower is the most historic urban medieval monument in Ireland. The elegant Chamber of Commerce building, the City Hall and the Bishop's Palace are prime examples of beautiful 18th century architecture. Waterford is the home of Waterford Crystal, the world-famous hand-crafted, cut glass product and is a sophisticated shopping venue for high fashion and craft & design centres. Ecclesiastical landmarks include St. Patrick's Churches, Black Friars, St. Olave's Church and Greyfriars. The Church Of Ireland Christ Church Cathedral, and the Catholic Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity were both designed by Waterford architect John Roberts (1714 - 1796). Waterford Treasures at the Granary is both a treasury of gold, bronze, silver, crystal and historical documents and a treasure trail that takes you through 1000 years of Ireland's oldest city. Waterford has a long theatrical and musical tradition, which centres on the historic Theatre Royal, which hosts the Waterford International Festival of Light Opera each year. In the Garter Lane Arts Centre, which is home to the local Red Kettle Theatre Company, other visiting groups and arts exhibitions. The "Large Room" in City Hall is the venue for the popular Waterford Show. The Forum Theatre is another theatrical venue in the city.

Day 27 Cruising
Day 28Port of Call La Rochelle Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

La Rochelle is a coastal city in southwestern France and capital of the Charente-Maritime department. It's been a center for fishing and trade since the 12th century, a maritime tradition that's reflected in its Vieux Port (old harbor) and huge, modern Les Minimes marina. The old town has half-timbered medieval houses and Renaissance architecture, including passageways covered by 17th-century arches.

Day 29Port of Call Bordeaux Arrival 8:00am

Overview

Visit a bottle of wine. It’s no secret. That’s what Bordeaux is known for and how you’ll likely spend your time in the world’s largest, premium wine district – savoring the wine and the sights. Bordeaux has long been synonymous with fine wines. Situated in the southwest of France in a graceful crescent along a bend in the Garonne River, you’ll find the region that delivers the full-bodied beverages known the world over. Connected to the Bay of Biscay and the Atlantic Ocean by the Gironde River (so wide it appears to be an inlet), the inland port of Bordeaux has been an important trading center since before the Roman era. (The city was founded in 3rd century BC by a Celtic tribe.) Bordeaux became incredibly prosperous during the 18th century, when the city was France’s most important port, and a hub for trade to and from the New World. Though its shipping industry has since declined, Bordeaux continues to be a regional transportation center, and its good fortune continues today with wine exports totaling the equivalent of nearly $10 billion US dollars each year. It was the Romans – not the French – who planted the first grape vines along the Garonne River in the 1st century BC. Wine became the life-blood of the region early on, and in many ways still is. Peak wine production in the 13th century produced export numbers that were not exceeded until the 1950s! The Bordeaux region is one of the largest purveyors of wine in the world, producing over half a billion bottles a year – more than 50% of France’s output. Area vineyards stretch to cover over 520 square miles producing wine that’s shipped to over 160 countries worldwide. No doubt, you’ve sampled more than a few of those bottles. Most of us have. But there is more to Bordeaux than wine. Most business and commercial areas are centered in the relatively small 18th century downtown area. The buildings that line the quays present stunning examples of the architecture of the Siecle des Lumieres, the Century of Enlightenment. The Place de la Bourse typifies this elegant style, with its slate roof, lower level arcades, and carved faces adorning the keystones of the arches. You can also visit the nearby Palais Gallien, a ruined Roman amphitheater; the Grand Theatre, the inspiration for the famed Paris Opera House; and the Musee des Beaux Arts, which features an impressive collection of French paintings. But art and architecture are not the only things the French do well. Gourmet dining is a specialty here, so be sure to indulge in a grand dinner with a fine regional wine. Gourmet shopping, of course, goes hand in hand with dining so take a stroll down the Rue Sainte Catherine, Porte Dijeaux, and the Course de Il’intendance, where you’ll find fresh foie gras, truffles, fine cheeses, and a broad selection of wines to enjoy right here or take home for later.

Day 30Bordeaux

Overview

Visit a bottle of wine. It’s no secret. That’s what Bordeaux is known for and how you’ll likely spend your time in the world’s largest, premium wine district – savoring the wine and the sights. Bordeaux has long been synonymous with fine wines. Situated in the southwest of France in a graceful crescent along a bend in the Garonne River, you’ll find the region that delivers the full-bodied beverages known the world over. Connected to the Bay of Biscay and the Atlantic Ocean by the Gironde River (so wide it appears to be an inlet), the inland port of Bordeaux has been an important trading center since before the Roman era. (The city was founded in 3rd century BC by a Celtic tribe.) Bordeaux became incredibly prosperous during the 18th century, when the city was France’s most important port, and a hub for trade to and from the New World. Though its shipping industry has since declined, Bordeaux continues to be a regional transportation center, and its good fortune continues today with wine exports totaling the equivalent of nearly $10 billion US dollars each year. It was the Romans – not the French – who planted the first grape vines along the Garonne River in the 1st century BC. Wine became the life-blood of the region early on, and in many ways still is. Peak wine production in the 13th century produced export numbers that were not exceeded until the 1950s! The Bordeaux region is one of the largest purveyors of wine in the world, producing over half a billion bottles a year – more than 50% of France’s output. Area vineyards stretch to cover over 520 square miles producing wine that’s shipped to over 160 countries worldwide. No doubt, you’ve sampled more than a few of those bottles. Most of us have. But there is more to Bordeaux than wine. Most business and commercial areas are centered in the relatively small 18th century downtown area. The buildings that line the quays present stunning examples of the architecture of the Siecle des Lumieres, the Century of Enlightenment. The Place de la Bourse typifies this elegant style, with its slate roof, lower level arcades, and carved faces adorning the keystones of the arches. You can also visit the nearby Palais Gallien, a ruined Roman amphitheater; the Grand Theatre, the inspiration for the famed Paris Opera House; and the Musee des Beaux Arts, which features an impressive collection of French paintings. But art and architecture are not the only things the French do well. Gourmet dining is a specialty here, so be sure to indulge in a grand dinner with a fine regional wine. Gourmet shopping, of course, goes hand in hand with dining so take a stroll down the Rue Sainte Catherine, Porte Dijeaux, and the Course de Il’intendance, where you’ll find fresh foie gras, truffles, fine cheeses, and a broad selection of wines to enjoy right here or take home for later.

Day 31Port of Call BordeauxDeparture 3:00pm

Overview

Visit a bottle of wine. It’s no secret. That’s what Bordeaux is known for and how you’ll likely spend your time in the world’s largest, premium wine district – savoring the wine and the sights. Bordeaux has long been synonymous with fine wines. Situated in the southwest of France in a graceful crescent along a bend in the Garonne River, you’ll find the region that delivers the full-bodied beverages known the world over. Connected to the Bay of Biscay and the Atlantic Ocean by the Gironde River (so wide it appears to be an inlet), the inland port of Bordeaux has been an important trading center since before the Roman era. (The city was founded in 3rd century BC by a Celtic tribe.) Bordeaux became incredibly prosperous during the 18th century, when the city was France’s most important port, and a hub for trade to and from the New World. Though its shipping industry has since declined, Bordeaux continues to be a regional transportation center, and its good fortune continues today with wine exports totaling the equivalent of nearly $10 billion US dollars each year. It was the Romans – not the French – who planted the first grape vines along the Garonne River in the 1st century BC. Wine became the life-blood of the region early on, and in many ways still is. Peak wine production in the 13th century produced export numbers that were not exceeded until the 1950s! The Bordeaux region is one of the largest purveyors of wine in the world, producing over half a billion bottles a year – more than 50% of France’s output. Area vineyards stretch to cover over 520 square miles producing wine that’s shipped to over 160 countries worldwide. No doubt, you’ve sampled more than a few of those bottles. Most of us have. But there is more to Bordeaux than wine. Most business and commercial areas are centered in the relatively small 18th century downtown area. The buildings that line the quays present stunning examples of the architecture of the Siecle des Lumieres, the Century of Enlightenment. The Place de la Bourse typifies this elegant style, with its slate roof, lower level arcades, and carved faces adorning the keystones of the arches. You can also visit the nearby Palais Gallien, a ruined Roman amphitheater; the Grand Theatre, the inspiration for the famed Paris Opera House; and the Musee des Beaux Arts, which features an impressive collection of French paintings. But art and architecture are not the only things the French do well. Gourmet dining is a specialty here, so be sure to indulge in a grand dinner with a fine regional wine. Gourmet shopping, of course, goes hand in hand with dining so take a stroll down the Rue Sainte Catherine, Porte Dijeaux, and the Course de Il’intendance, where you’ll find fresh foie gras, truffles, fine cheeses, and a broad selection of wines to enjoy right here or take home for later.

Day 32Port of Call Saint-Jean-de-Luz Arrival 8:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Saint-Jean-de-Luz is a fishing town at the mouth of the Nivelle river, in southwest France’s Basque country. The Saint-Jean-Baptiste Church, where King Louis XIV married Marie-Therese of Spain in 1660, has a gilded baroque altarpiece and wooden galleries. The turreted Maison Louis XIV is a museum that recreates 17th-century domestic life with period furniture. It includes the King’s Chamber, where Louis XIV slept.

Day 33Port of Call Gijon Arrival 7:00amDeparture 3:00pm

Overview

Gijon, with almost 300 000 inhabitants, is the capital of the "Costa Verde". Gijon is a modern city with every single facility needed. The wide range of hotels, restaurants & shopping facilities is mainly in the city-centre, by Corrida Street. In addition to being the main city in Asturias, Gijon has the largest concentration of industries, backed up by the outer harbour "El Musel", one of the busiest in Spain. One of the most important tourist resources is San Lorenzo Beach, with a 3 mile-long promenade. The Marina, with its modern installs is also a must-see. But there are even more beaches in Gijon: Arbeyal, Poniente... There are lots of typical little towns around Gijon: green valleys, beautiful meadows... Both in the center and outskirts you can find spots to relax as Isabel la Católica Park or Monte de Deva. Gijon is the perfect place to have a lot of fun. Festivities in the city take place all through the year as "Antroxu" (Carnival)... but there are even more things going on during summer-time: "Semana Negra", "International Film Festival", "Day of Asturias", "Fiestas de Begona", "International Trade Fair of Asturias", concerts, parades, sporting events, cultural activities... All this makes Gijon unforgettable and makes you want to come back again.

Day 34 Cruising
Day 35Port of Call Tangier Arrival 10:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

At the crossroads of Africa and Europe, the Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean, Tangier has an individual character. It is one of the oldest cities in Morocco. The Phoenicians and Carthaginians established trading posts here. The Romans made it a capital city. It was occupied by the Arabs and invaded by Vandals and Visigoths. Before the Spanish, the Portuguese controlled the town. In the early part of the 20th century, Tangier was an international city whose tax-free status and cosmopolitan image attracted European and American artists and writers. Although it has lost a little of its glamorous image, it is still a bustling city with an air of mystery surrounding it. For most visitors that arrive in Morocco by sea, it is their first point of contact with the country. The town beach has a great setting: it makes up a several kilometer long curve with the white houses of Tangier as a frame before it ends in the barren mountains of which there is nothing further north than sea and the European continent. One of the main centers of afternoon and early evening activities in Tangier is along the beach walk. Activities here are rather common, people walk up and down this avenue size street, looking at people and allowing others to look at them. There are several Atlantic beaches west of Tangier, which all offer a good alternative to the town beach. The setting of these beaches can be most attractive, with mountains on all sides, yet with a wide and clean beach with all necessary amenities. The medina of Tangier is a real one: Streets are narrow, houses in many different styles, and most of this medina is in good condition. That is a proof that even people with some money both live and work here. The medina is quite big, and there are many commercial areas. Most of these serve the tourist traffic, and it is more difficult to find any areas where real handcraft is performed.

Day 36 Melilla Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm
Day 37Port of Call Alicante Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Lying on the Eastern coast of Spain, Alicante has it all: parties, discos, festivals, castles - and if that isn't enough - hot sun, white sand beaches and a turquoise sea. Of course, something so good can't stay hidden for ever, and Alicante and the towns along the Costa Blanca (White Coast) are now among Europe's most heavily visited regions. If you want a secluded beach, or to be anywhere outdoors without being part of a crowd, don't come during the summer high season. But if you're looking for sunshine, all-night disco parties and hundreds of thousands of potential new friends, you've come to the right place. It's best to start exploring Alicante on the beachfront, along the city's main pedestrian walkway, the Expanada de Espana. Spread out in front of the main part of the city, this elegant boulevard, stretching around the harbour, is shaded with palm trees and lined with shops and cafes. In the midst of this Mediterranean Xanadu there is, sadly, one note of warning: be especially wary here of pickpockets and bag snatchers. Northwest of the Explanada, towards the center of the city, you'll see the imposing Catedral de San Nicolas, and around it, the narrow streets of the El Barro, or old quarter, which has most of the cheaper accommodation and the best nightlife. To the southwest, near the Calle de Italia, you'll find the main tourist office, post office, and the city's central bus and train stations. Alicante is a hive of activity throughout the year, not just in the summer months. It's a city where the sand seems to go on forever…and so does the entertainment. It's a city steeped in history, rich in culture, awash with every kind of shop and restaurant imaginable and literally bursting with beach life. Stroll along the palm-fringed Paseo de la Explanada - the impressive seafront promenade lined with street cafes and inlaid with red, cream and black marble. Stop at the music pavilion and enjoy a free al fresco concert by the sea. Concerts are held in the afternoons, on feast days and on Sunday mornings during the summer months.

Day 38Port of Call Barcelona Arrival 8:00am

Overview

Barcelona is a charming, cosmopolitan port on the shores of the Mediterranean sea. This prosperous and bilingual (Spanish and Catalan) metropolis measures up to a city such as Madrid: its museums, theaters, art galleries and nightlife area of an impressive high standard. Besides that, this art and design centre has a lot of interesting sights to offer to its visitors. The best place to watch people go by, to stroll or simply relax, is 'Las Ramblas', a pedestrian street with dozens of outdoor cafes. Here, you’ll find flower-stands, book kiosks and small market stalls where they sell birds and small animals. You’ll also find an endlessly fascinating flowing receptacle of pageant-jugglers, singers, dancers, puppeteers, sidewalk artists, living statues and assorted oddballs on parade. Nearby is 'Plaça Real', with plenty of bars and restaurants, and 'Palau Guell', built by the Catalan architectural genius Antoni Gaudi in his undulating art-nouveau style. After having seen these sights, stroll the narrow winding streets of the 'Barri Gotic', the medieval Gothic quarter full of interesting tapas bars and cafes. Check out Picasso’s old hangout, 'Els Quatre Gats', which has been renovated without losing its bohemian charm. Or head for the old Barceloneta section on the waterfront. This working-class area, which was always slightly rundown and scruffy-looking, is now packed with paella restaurants. The new beach area, which runs from Barceloneta to the Olympic village, is much cleaner than the old beach area. Although some people believe that it has been cleaned up considerably, it might be a wise idea to stay out of the water. Fortunately, the beach itself is already a feast for the eyes (and ears), with its huge and roaring waves.

Day 39Port of Call BarcelonaDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Barcelona is a charming, cosmopolitan port on the shores of the Mediterranean sea. This prosperous and bilingual (Spanish and Catalan) metropolis measures up to a city such as Madrid: its museums, theaters, art galleries and nightlife area of an impressive high standard. Besides that, this art and design centre has a lot of interesting sights to offer to its visitors. The best place to watch people go by, to stroll or simply relax, is 'Las Ramblas', a pedestrian street with dozens of outdoor cafes. Here, you’ll find flower-stands, book kiosks and small market stalls where they sell birds and small animals. You’ll also find an endlessly fascinating flowing receptacle of pageant-jugglers, singers, dancers, puppeteers, sidewalk artists, living statues and assorted oddballs on parade. Nearby is 'Plaça Real', with plenty of bars and restaurants, and 'Palau Guell', built by the Catalan architectural genius Antoni Gaudi in his undulating art-nouveau style. After having seen these sights, stroll the narrow winding streets of the 'Barri Gotic', the medieval Gothic quarter full of interesting tapas bars and cafes. Check out Picasso’s old hangout, 'Els Quatre Gats', which has been renovated without losing its bohemian charm. Or head for the old Barceloneta section on the waterfront. This working-class area, which was always slightly rundown and scruffy-looking, is now packed with paella restaurants. The new beach area, which runs from Barceloneta to the Olympic village, is much cleaner than the old beach area. Although some people believe that it has been cleaned up considerably, it might be a wise idea to stay out of the water. Fortunately, the beach itself is already a feast for the eyes (and ears), with its huge and roaring waves.

Day 40Port of Call Antibes Arrival 11:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Antibes is a resort town between Cannes and Nice on the French Riviera (Cote d’Azur). It’s known for its old town enclosed by 16th-century ramparts with the star-shaped Fort Carre. This overlooks luxury yachts moored at the Port Vauban marina. The forested Cap d’Antibes peninsula, dotted with grand villas, separates Antibes from Juan-les-Pins, a chic resort with buzzing nightlife and the Jazz a Juan music festival.

Day 41Port of Call Porto Santo Stefano Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

A town on Argentario is Santo Stefano, a lively bustling port where you can catch the ferry to the neighbouring islands of Giglio and Giannutri. Although there has been a fishing village here for centuries much of the town was bombed during the war and so had to be recontructed. Cleverly, they used a lot of the old stone for rebuilding which makes its newness far less obvious. Along the front there is an excellent fish market and a profusion of restaurants, as well as the marina, where you can admire beautiful yachts and luxurious gin-palaces. It is the perfect place for a passeggiata – the Italian word for taking a stroll while watching the world go by.

Day 42Port of Call Salerno Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Syracuse is a city on the Ionian coast of Sicily, Italy. It's known for its ancient ruins. The central Archaeological Park Neapolis comprises the Roman Amphitheater, the Teatro Greco and the Orecchio di Dionisio, a limestone cave shaped like a human ear. The Museo Archeologico Regionale Paolo Orsi exhibits terracotta artifacts, Roman portraits and Old Testament scenes carved into white marble.

Day 43Port of Call Taormina Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Taormina is a hilltop town on the east coast of Sicily. It sits near Mount Etna, an active volcano with trails leading to the summit. The town is known for the Teatro Antico di Taormina, an ancient Greco-­Roman theater still used today. Near the theater, cliffs drop to the sea forming coves with sandy beaches. A narrow stretch of sand connects to Isola Bella, a tiny island and nature reserve.

Day 44Port of Call Crotone Arrival 7:00amDeparture 4:00pm

Overview

Crotone is a port city in Calabria, southern Italy. The monumental Castello di Carlo V is a 9th-century fortress that was modified in the 1500s. The National Archaeological Museum houses items, including a gold tiara, unearthed at the ancient Temple of Hera Lacinia in the nearby Capo Colonna Archaeological Park. Farther south is the Capo Rizzuto Marine Protected Area, with seagrass forests, barracudas and starfish.

Day 45Port of Call Kotor Arrival 9:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Kotor is a fortified town on Montenegro’s Adriatic coast, in a bay near the limestone cliffs of Mt. Lovcen. Characterized by winding streets and squares, its medieval old town has several Romanesque churches, including Kotor Cathedral. It's also home to the Maritime Museum, which explores local seafaring history. Sveti Ðorde, one of 2 tiny islands off the ancient town of Perast, features a centuries-old church.

Day 46Port of Call Igoumenitsa Arrival 10:00amDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

Igoumenitsa is a coastal city in northwestern Greece. It is the capital of the regional unit of Thesprotia. Igoumenitsa is the chief port of Thesprotia and Epirus, and one of the largest passenger ports of Greece, connecting northwestern Mainland Greece with the Ionian Islands and Italy. The city is built on easternmost end of the Gulf of Igoumenitsa in the Ionian Sea and primary aspects of the economy are maritime, transport, services, agriculture and tourism. The 670 km (420 mi) long Egnatia Highway, which serves northern Greece, terminates at Igoumenitsa, making it a popular starting point for tourists coming from Europe and ending point for trucks from Turkey.

Day 47Port of Call Cephalonia Island Arrival 7:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Kefalonia is the largest island in the Ionian Sea and sixth in size in Greece. It is located between the islands of Lefkada and Zakynthos and across the Corinthian Gulf. The deep blue sea, the golden sandy beaches, the unique dreamy caves, the rocky mountains and the traditional settlements with their picturesque ness and grandeur of the past will be the ideal scenery of your holidays in the island of Kefalonia. Its beautiful places, archeological areas and historical monuments will impress you. It is only 35 klm from mainland Greece and 30 klm from the coasts of Peloponnese; it covers an area of 781 square klm and a coastline of 254 klm. The inhabitants of the island are occupied with wine making, agriculture, fishing and the tourism. Its population is 32.000. In the island, there is the big mountain range of Enos or the "Big Mountain", which is said that it is the geological continuation of the mountain range of Pindos. The mountain Enos offers a unique and magical view of the plains of the island, of the beautiful graphic villages and of the blue sea of the Ionian Sea. The highest peak of the "Big Mountain", Megas Soros, reaches the 1640 m, whereas other high peaks are, Kokkini Rahi, Xerakias and Agia Dinati. The fruitful plains of the island are, Kranea, Omalon, Sami and Lixouri. The tradition and the folklore revive through customs, festivities and local events in every traditional settlement of the island. The art of wood-carving is visible on the wonderful icon screens of the churches. The art of hagiography along with the ecclesiastic architecture impress the visitors. The Ionian architecture and the hospitality of the inhabitants make the island to a summer refuge for relaxation. The cultural physiognomy of the island is influenced by the constant conquests, populative changes and by the influences from the west and particularly by Italy. Among the people that stand out in the island are, the poet Andrea Laskarato, George Molfeta, Gerasimo Markora, Marino Antipa and Rokos Hodas. The island shows a particular paleologic interest because of the findings of the Paleolithic era, which reinforce the point of view that man existed in the island 50.000 years ago. Above the small peninsula, in the area of Fanari, stands the wonderful Argostoli, the capital of the island, with the bridge of Drapano, the Koutavos lagoon, the Lighthouse of Agii Theodori and the Cave of Agios Gerasimos.

Day 48Port of Call Monemvasia Arrival 8:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

At the far end of Peloponnese, on the south eastern coast of the peninsula looking on to Mirtoon Sea, at a distance of 95 km form the town of Sparta, stands Monemvasia. Today a causeway bridges the gap that separates the former peninsula from the mainland and leads us behind the fortification walls into a unique, intact medieval city - state, a refuge for many artists in our own day. Apart from old mansions, it possesses a wealth of Byzantine churches - around forty of them. Among the most outstanding are Ayia Anna, a 14th century basilica, Ayios Nikolaos (18th century), the Panayia Kritikia, Ayios Stephanos in Italian - Byzantine style (16th century), and Ayios Pavlos (10th century). The most important of all is the church of Christ Elkomenos (13th century), Monemvasia's cathedral, with its four Byzantine icons and its two marble imperial thrones. The architecture of the houses betrays a strong Venetian influence, with the chimneys facing east and the balconies overlooking the sea. On the top of the rock stands the Castle itself, while the church of Ayia Sophia (13th century) stands at its steepest point. This is a rare example of an octagonal church with dome; there are a few frescoes preserved within. The new village of Nea Monemvassia lies just a thousand metres from the causeway on the mainland. It is a modern tourist resort with fine beaches. Northwest of Monemvassia, on the road to Sparta, is the farming town of Molai, where there are the remains of a medieval fortress and an early Christian church. At Halasmata it's worth stopping to see the mosaic floors in the three ruined 6th century churches there. One of the prettiest sandy beaches in the Peloponnese, Elias, is just 9 km from Molai. Neapolis, a seaside resort much favoured by Greeks because of its beautiful, long beaches, lies to the south of Monemvasia. From Neapolis it is easy to cross over to Elafonisos, a small island blessed with beaches worthy of a tropical paradise, backed with sand dunes and pinewoods. Fresh fish abound in this part of the Peloponnese. Kiparissi, to the north of Monemvasia and southeast of Sparta, is a charming coastal village which has recently developed into a resort attracting those who like "to get away from it all". It has three marvelous stretches of beach lining three successive coves. If you have time, patience and a love for the Greek landscape, Laconia in the southern portion of the Peloponnese has countless more delightful spots to reward the explorer. A distinctly shaped great rock - "capsized ship" according to Greek poet Yiannis Ritsos - rising from the sea, only a few meters from the coast is often referred as the "Gibraltar of Greece". A thin strip of land links it with the Gefyra, a fishing village on the main land. It takes 15 to 20 minutes walking from Gefyra to Monemvasia. On the north side of the bay there are a few houses consisting the small village of Palea (old) Monemvasia. Walking along the road you find the cemetery where in 1989 the famous Greek poet Ioannis Ritsos was buried as it was his motherland. After the cemetery you reach the lower town of Monemvasia which is called "the Fortress" today. A wall protects the lower town from three sides east, south and west. There are several churches around like Panagia Chrisafitissa, Panagia Mirtidiotissa, Christos Elkomenos, Agia Sofia. On the east side of the main square stands the house with a garden containing the remains of the early Byzantine church. At the west end of the square there is the "Stellakis" house as it is known, that was reconstructed giving a lot of information about the architectural details and the appearance of the medieval town. A small zigzag path connects the lower town with the upper town and it was difficult not only for the attackers but for the residents to curry their supplies using their hands or their donkeys. The Fort city of Monemvasia with the one and only gate as its name suggests, turns a dream into reality. The site on which the rock now stands was called Minoa and was probably used by ancient Cretans seafarers as a base. That was where Greeks sought refuge from Slav invaders. They fortified the site using it as a harbour. The church of Agia Sofia overlooks the region at the bleakest part of the rock and is one of the most beautiful worship spots in Greece. You will walk past a mosque converted into a museum, along an uphill path that takes you to the Fort. Old stone built mansions now used as inns and hotels form arcades over steps and greenery creating an environment of superb beauty.

Day 49Port of Call Athens/Piraeus Arrival 6:00amDeparture 9:00pm

Overview

Today Piraeus is the home base of Greek shipping, the largest commercial fleet in the world, apace bound to the sea like few others. The harbours of Zea and Mikrolimano as well as Phaliro play host to countless yachts and sailing craft throughout the year. Piraeus was known in medieval times as Porto Leone, a name due to the enormous stone lion, which guarded the port's entrance. Today, the life of Piraeus is centred on its three ports: the main, central one and those of Zea and Mikrolimano. You can walk around the central harbour, shared by cargo and passenger ships alike, and watch the constant comings and goings of goods and people from around the world. Having completed your tour of the central harbour of Piraeus you will then head south traversing the peninsula and arrive at Peiraiki, one of the most picturesque neighbour hoods in the city. Here one finds the harbour of Zea, one of the largest marinas in the Mediterranean. If the night finds you in the area, you can try one of the many bars found nearby. You can continue your tour along the waterfront heading towards Kastella but a small deviation toward the city centre will be useful for then you can visit the verdant square of the municipal Theatre with cafeterias and shops of all kinds surrounding it. The magnificent building housing the Municipal Theatre as well as the Town Hall and the Library complete the picture presented by the main square in the city. Piraeus's little natural harbours are among its busiest and most touristy areas: Mikrolimano, Passalimani, Zea, Freatida and Hatzikiriakio. Countless seaside tavernas provide delicious seafood washed down with the uniquely Greek drink, ouzo. The fresh smell of the sea and the sounds made by the assortment of caiques, yachts and sailing ships, which are moored next to the tables, complete the enjoyment of the food Beyond the port, the most impressive spots are the hills of Profitis Ilias and Kastela with their neoclassical mansions and modern buildings which look as they are hanging over the sea.

Day 50Port of Call Ermoupolis Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Ermoupolis is not only the main town of Syros but is also the administrative capital of the whole Cyclades. Our reason for choosing this large town is purely selfish, for Ermoupolis is probably one of the most interesting towns. A period of great wealth and elegance in the 17th & 18th centuries has bequethed Ermoupolis with neo-classical style buildings on the grandest of scales. The central square with the massive town hall surrounded by cafes is a good starting point as you stroll from the church to museum to market to waterfront and beyond, as each turning reveals something new. The two hills of Ano Syros with its medieval town and Vrontado topped by the church of Anastasis climb high above the shoreline of Ermoupolis and complete the tableau of what is a Greek Island holiday with a difference. Syros has been one of the Cycladic Civilization centers. It has been inhabited since the Neolithic years and there are archaeological finds that date back to the start of the Neolithic Age around 3000 BC. Homer reports that two cities thrived in the whole island: Phoenice and Posidonia. Sightseeing: Ermoupoli: Archaeological Museum. The Town House. The Jesuit monastery. The Capuchin monastery. Cycladic Art Gallery.

Day 51Port of Call Thira/Santorini Arrival 7:00amDeparture 11:00pm

Overview

Fira is a comparatively modern town, with houses built mostly during the 19th century when the old Venetian capital at Skaros became untenable due to earthquakes. The architecture is a jumble of Cycladic and Venetian, side by side, the similarities between the two being the stark whiteness. The impact of Aegean tourism has made itself felt in Fira, judging from the abundance of taverns, hotels, discotheques and shops. It is the largest town on the island and has gained preference with travelers because it is central and access to other parts of Santorini is made easy by either taxi or bus. From there you can indulge in some inspiring coastal walks. Wandering through the white cobbled streets of Fira, a town of about 2,000 inhabitants, one gets the feel of the old-world charm blended in with the modern day comforts. The town's archaeological museum is crammed with finds from excavations at Akrotiri. But besides being so interesting archaeologically, Santorini is essentially a beauty spot, an island whose cliffs seem to glow under an exceptionally clear light all day, but which at sunset glow redly, evoking that vast explosion more than 3000 years ago.

Day 52Port of Call Patmos Island Arrival 7:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

A small volcanic island in the Egean Sea, off the coast of Asia Minor, to the south of Samos and west of Miletus, in lat. 37° 20' N. and long. 26° 35' E. Its length is about ten miles, its breadth six miles, and its coast line thirty seven miles. The highest point is Hagios Elias (Mt. St. Elias) rising to over 1050 feet. The island was formerly covered with luxuriant palm groves, which won it the name of Palmosa; of these groves there remains but a clump in the valley called "The Saint's Garden". The ancient capital occupied the northern isthmus. The modern town of Patmos lies in the middle part of the island. Above it towers the battlements of St. John's Monastery, founded in 1088 by St. Christobulus. The Island of Patmos is famous in history as the place of St. John's exile: "I, John . . . was in the island, which is called Patmos, for the word of God, and for the testimony of Jesus there according to general belief the Beloved Disciple wrote the Apocalypse, the imagery of which was in part inspired by the scenery of the island. The spot where St. John was favoured with his revelations is pointed out as a cave on the slope of the hill, half way between the shore and the modern town of Patmos. "The Jerusalem of the Aegean" is one way of describing Patmos as it was referred to in one 5th century inscription. It was here that St. John the Theologian was exiled between 95 and 97 A.D. and was inspired to write the Book of Revelation or Apocalypse. Later the emperor Alexios Komninos ordered the monk Christodoulos Letrinos to found a monastery in honour of the Apostle. Thus the holy monastery of Patmos was built, the most important landmark on the island. In September 1995 it was celebrated the anniversary of the 1900 years from the date that the Book of Revelation was written. Patmos, situated between Leros and Ikaria, is a mountainous island with rocky soil and an abundance of small coves. The majestic fortress - monastery crowns the hill above the port, surrounded by dazzling white, cubelike houses which spill down its flanks. Interspersed among them are miniscule churches and grand sea captains' mansions, separated from each other by narrow lanes, high walls and small squares opening onto breath - catching views over the Aegean. The construction of the monastery began in the 11th century. It is circumscribed by massive grey stone walls with battlements that protected the main church and another five chapels. Its extraordinary treasury contains Byzantine and post-Byzantine icons, sacred vessels, 9th century embroideries and other pricelless objects, while its library houses parchment documents, patriarchal seals, illuminated manuscripts and rare old books. In the chapel dedicated to Our Lady frescoes can be seen which date to 1210-1220.

Day 53Port of Call Skiathos Arrival 9:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Skiathos Town (khora) is the chief place and indeed the island's only real town, where almost all the permanent inhabitants of the island live. It was built in 1830 on two low-lying hills, when after the War of Independence people left the town located at Kastro and settled near the harbour. It was reconstructed after heavy German bombardment during World War II. Skiathos officially became a town in 1965 and today has a population of 5.000.

Day 54Port of Call Bozcaada Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Tenedos or Bozcaada is an island of Turkey in the northeastern part of the Aegean Sea. Administratively, the island constitutes the Bozcaada district of Çanakkale province.

Day 55Port of Call Istanbul Arrival 8:00am

Overview

Istanbul is an international art and cultural center. The International Arts and Cultural Festival is held each year in June and July with famous artists coming from all over the world. These performances are held mostly at the Ataturk Cultural Center. Those who enjoy classical music can hear it at the Cemal Resit Rey Hall. Operas, operettas, ballets, films, concerts, exhibitions and conferences all contribute to the cultural palette of the city. Istanbul also has a rich program of light entertainment. Nightclubs provide splendid entertainment throughout dinner, ranging from a selection of Turkish songs to belly-dancing. Istanbul is a preffered city in terms of international art activities . This is because the art-lovers of Istanbul are respectful to the art and the artist. The famous performance artists feel themselves very comfortable in Istanbul concerts. Because the audience is very well aware of "the rituel of watching an artistic performance." The artist knows that he or she will not come across with impudent or disrespectful behavviours. It is the same for the international picture galleries, biennials, and visual activities. Neither the spectator nor the critic leave their "respectful attitude aganist the artist. " Hence the myths of traditional pop-rock genres, giants of jazz contempoporarylegends of classical western music are always in Istanbul, on the stage. To sum up; Istanbul is a city that can add compassion next to its giant size in terms of living area and population, and siling to assimilate the universal culture while "welcoming" it with utmost hospitality: a "world city" In this case, it deserves to be called "universal culture capital"

Day 56Port of Call IstanbulDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Istanbul is an international art and cultural center. The International Arts and Cultural Festival is held each year in June and July with famous artists coming from all over the world. These performances are held mostly at the Ataturk Cultural Center. Those who enjoy classical music can hear it at the Cemal Resit Rey Hall. Operas, operettas, ballets, films, concerts, exhibitions and conferences all contribute to the cultural palette of the city. Istanbul also has a rich program of light entertainment. Nightclubs provide splendid entertainment throughout dinner, ranging from a selection of Turkish songs to belly-dancing. Istanbul is a preffered city in terms of international art activities . This is because the art-lovers of Istanbul are respectful to the art and the artist. The famous performance artists feel themselves very comfortable in Istanbul concerts. Because the audience is very well aware of "the rituel of watching an artistic performance." The artist knows that he or she will not come across with impudent or disrespectful behavviours. It is the same for the international picture galleries, biennials, and visual activities. Neither the spectator nor the critic leave their "respectful attitude aganist the artist. " Hence the myths of traditional pop-rock genres, giants of jazz contempoporarylegends of classical western music are always in Istanbul, on the stage. To sum up; Istanbul is a city that can add compassion next to its giant size in terms of living area and population, and siling to assimilate the universal culture while "welcoming" it with utmost hospitality: a "world city" In this case, it deserves to be called "universal culture capital"

Day 57Port of Call Dikili Arrival 10:00amDeparture 10:00pm

Overview

Turkey’s Aegean Coast is a land of contrasts, where bikini-clad bathers and beach resorts vie with traditional bazaars and cafés selling Turkish coffee poured from brass-spouted urns. The past is always present in the artifacts of a Hellenic culture which once flowered all over the Anatolia. Dikili is your gateway to ancient Pergamon (now Bergama), one of the greatest cities in Hellenic history. Founded by a general of Alexander the Great, Pergamon was renewed for its library, which was bigger than Alexandria’s, and its medical center, which supposedly never lost a patient. See the huge 10,000-seat amphitheater and the remains of the Asclepian where the great Greek physician Galen healed his patients.

Day 58Port of Call Cesme Arrival 8:00amDeparture 9:00pm

Overview

Çesme is a Turkish resort town west of Izmir, on the Aegean Sea. Overlooking the harbor is Çesme Castle, a restored military fortress. It now houses the Çesme Archaeology Museum, with displays of marble busts, metal coins and artifacts from nearby excavations. On the east side of the Çesme peninsula is sandy Ilica Beach, with warm thermal sulfur springs. Around Çesme are clear waters and accessible dive sites.

Day 59 Didim Arrival 7:00amDeparture 7:00pm
Day 60Port of Call Rhodes Arrival 7:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

The city of Rhodes is situated on the northern part of the island and has a population of 40,000 inhabitants. The town is characterized by modern blocks of flats, wide streets, stores, squares, monuments, picturesque neighborhoods, neo-classical houses, Byzantine churches and Turkish mosque. The recent touristic growth contributed to the construction of modern hotel units, night clubs, tavernas, restaurants and numerous shops. The sites of Rhodes are varied and interesting. Among them, one should visit the ruins of the Ancient City on the hill of Monte Smith, the mosque of Myrat Reis, the mosque of Souleiman, the Hydrobiological Institute, the churches of Agios Fragiskos, Panagia Nikis, True Cross, Panagia Kastrou, Profitis Ilias and Evangelistira, with the beautiful frescoes created by Kondoglou. One should also visit the windmills, the tower of Agios Nikolaos at the port of Mandraki, as well as the green park of Rodini, a few kilometres outside the city. The most impressive part of the city is the Medieval Town, the dominating walls surrounding it and the Palace of the Grand Magistrates, signifying the city's glorious and glamorous past. One should also visit the museums of Rhodes which are of extreme interest. The Archaeological Museum, housed in the Hospital of the Knights, includes sculpture, pots and several remarkable findings, while the Folk Museum exhibits a collection of traditional costumes and objects of daily use.

Day 61Port of Call Alanya Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Alanya was founded on the top and sides of the high peninsula dividing the county into two. As for the castle overviewing the town on both sides, it is probably the most attractive spot. The castle walls going up for 6,5 km to the Inner Castle on the hill was initially built during the Hellenistic period but raised further, fortified and furnished with 110 towers during the Seljukid period. Alanya is very hot in the summer months. You should take precautions not to be harmed by this excess heat. Stay close to water bodies in which you can bathe or shady shelters where you can take refuge. Plateaux are a pleasant escapade. You can also bathe in cool waters of Alara and Dim Çayy streams. The most appropriate time of the year for a tour of Alanya is between the months of April, May and October , November. The Triathlon is held at 23rd of October annually.

Day 62Port of Call Limassol Arrival 7:00amDeparture 4:00pm

Overview

Limassol is the second biggest town of Cyprus and its biggest Municipality. It has experienced great development after the tragic events occurred by the Turkish invasion in 1974, becoming the biggest port in the Mediterranean transit trade. Limassol has since then become one of the most important tourism, trade and service-providing centre in the area. Limassol is renowned for its long cultural tradition. A wide spectrum of activities and a great number of museums and archaeological sites are proposed to the interested visitor. A unique combination of ancient, Frankish, Byzantine and other modern influences is observed.

Day 63Port of Call Ashdod Arrival 6:00amDeparture 11:00pm

Overview

Ashdod is the sixth-largest city and the largest port in Israel accounting for 60% of the country's imported goods. Ashdod is located in the Southern District of the country, on the Mediterranean coast where it is situated between Tel Aviv to the North and Ashkelon to the South. Jerusalem is 53 km to the east. The city is also an important regional industrial center. Modern Ashdod covers the territory of two ancient twin towns, one inland and one on the coast, which were for most of their history two separate entities, connected by close ties with each other. This article deals with these historic towns, including other ancient nearby sites, and modern Ashdod.

Day 64Port of Call Haifa Arrival 6:00am

Overview

Haifa, Israel's third largest city and northern capital is the heart of it all! Situated in a broad natural bay between the beautiful Mediterranean Sea and the inspiring Carmel Mountain, the city's terraced landscape offers a rich variety of breathtaking panoramas, giving the observer the sensation of being on a heavenly peninsula. To the Northeast, across the sparkling waters of the harbor sits the medieval walled fortress city of Acre. Directly North, if the weather is good, beacon the heights of Rosh Hanikra, the white cliff, checkpoint on the Israel-Lebanon border. Further East towers the snow capped peak of Mount Hermon. Haifa is home to 250,000 inhabitants, members of five different religions, living side by side in harmony, peace and mutual respect. A rich tapestry of contrasts and colors, varying cultures, and ethnic groups makes up the fabric of life in Haifa. Secular, Religious and Ultra-Orthodox Jews live side by side with Christians, Moslems, Bahai and Druze. Wadi Nisnas, with its colorful shouk and bustling streets is an authentic Middle Eastern neighborhood. Nearby, the Orthodox Geula Street, recalls the sights and sounds of an East European community. Close at hand, reside the carefully anicured Persian gardens and the glittering gold dome of the Bahai Shrine, World Center of the Bahai faith.

Day 65Port of Call HaifaDeparture 10:00pm

Overview

Haifa, Israel's third largest city and northern capital is the heart of it all! Situated in a broad natural bay between the beautiful Mediterranean Sea and the inspiring Carmel Mountain, the city's terraced landscape offers a rich variety of breathtaking panoramas, giving the observer the sensation of being on a heavenly peninsula. To the Northeast, across the sparkling waters of the harbor sits the medieval walled fortress city of Acre. Directly North, if the weather is good, beacon the heights of Rosh Hanikra, the white cliff, checkpoint on the Israel-Lebanon border. Further East towers the snow capped peak of Mount Hermon. Haifa is home to 250,000 inhabitants, members of five different religions, living side by side in harmony, peace and mutual respect. A rich tapestry of contrasts and colors, varying cultures, and ethnic groups makes up the fabric of life in Haifa. Secular, Religious and Ultra-Orthodox Jews live side by side with Christians, Moslems, Bahai and Druze. Wadi Nisnas, with its colorful shouk and bustling streets is an authentic Middle Eastern neighborhood. Nearby, the Orthodox Geula Street, recalls the sights and sounds of an East European community. Close at hand, reside the carefully anicured Persian gardens and the glittering gold dome of the Bahai Shrine, World Center of the Bahai faith.

Day 66Port of Call Ashdod Arrival 6:00am

Overview

Ashdod is the sixth-largest city and the largest port in Israel accounting for 60% of the country's imported goods. Ashdod is located in the Southern District of the country, on the Mediterranean coast where it is situated between Tel Aviv to the North and Ashkelon to the South. Jerusalem is 53 km to the east. The city is also an important regional industrial center. Modern Ashdod covers the territory of two ancient twin towns, one inland and one on the coast, which were for most of their history two separate entities, connected by close ties with each other. This article deals with these historic towns, including other ancient nearby sites, and modern Ashdod.

Day 67Port of Call AshdodDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Ashdod is the sixth-largest city and the largest port in Israel accounting for 60% of the country's imported goods. Ashdod is located in the Southern District of the country, on the Mediterranean coast where it is situated between Tel Aviv to the North and Ashkelon to the South. Jerusalem is 53 km to the east. The city is also an important regional industrial center. Modern Ashdod covers the territory of two ancient twin towns, one inland and one on the coast, which were for most of their history two separate entities, connected by close ties with each other. This article deals with these historic towns, including other ancient nearby sites, and modern Ashdod.

Day 68Port of Call Paphos Arrival 10:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

The charming west coast town of Paphos focuses around an attractive little harbor whose picturesque open-air fish restaurants line a quayside of bright fishing boats and pleasure craft. With a population of just 38.000, Paphos nests in the lee of the Western Troodos Mountains, which add another dimension to this area of scenic beauty. The recent addition of its own international airport nearby has opened up the Paphos area, and the resort is graced with some luxury hotels along the coastline. Paphos has an air of holiday charm combined with history, and older-day elegance is lent to the town by its classical style buildings in the upper part of town, which leads to the shopping area. The lower part of the town - known as Kato Paphos has a life of its own albeit so close by, down near the sea -home of the harbor, the fish taverns, souvenir shops and several beautiful hotels with important archaeological sites around them.

Day 69Port of Call Antalya Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Antalya is a world apart with its long summers, mild winters, unpolluted waters and sandy beaches. The snow remains on the top of Toros and Bay mountains during hot seasons and you may swim in the warm waters of Mediterranean at the same day. It's the pearl of Mediterranean. Combining history and culture it deserves the title of "capital of Turkish tourism". Kaleici where quaint Turkish and Greek houses are under protection, is the most popular center in Antalya. Traces of Byzantine, Roman and Seljuks architecture and culture can still be seen in the rustic old town. Take time to visit the arcaelogical museum which houses the finds belonging to historic ages of Anatolia. Inside the city Yivli Minare and Kulliye, Karaalioglu park are in our host of places to see. Konyaalti and Lara coasts invite you to its crystal clear waters. The prominent sites accesible by daily tours are Side, Perge, Manavgat and Alanya. It's a must to add Kursunlu and Duden waterfalls to your list.

Day 70Port of Call Marmaris Arrival 8:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Cosmopolitan charms of Marmaris, that used to be a fishing village less than 20 years ago, will surprise anyone with a choice of accommodation and entertainment. Marmaris is a Turkish Rivera. Once you set your foot here you will join its true vacation atmosphere! The old quarter of the town with its bustling bazaars and restaurants are well worth a visit. During the day, people head for the beach to do catamaran trips, parasailing, water skiing, sailing, scuba diving and the list goes on! Yet in Marmaris you are not confined to the town beach. Icmeler and its beach is 8 km down the road. Alternatively take advantage of one of the boats that chug away in the morning from the marina to scores of sandy beaches like Cleopatra's Island and the Turtle Beach. Once a little fishing port, Marmaris has developed into one of Turkeys busiest and most Anglicized resorts. Its port welcomes luxury cruise liners, which disgorge passengers keen to sample the towns extensive facilities and visit the archaeological sites nearby, just to name a few - the ancient city of Efes, (the second biggest city of Roman Empire, after Rome); another sightseeing place not to be missed is Pamukkale, that is considered to be the 8th world wonder. And much more! Marmaris also is South Aegean's prettiest resort for scuba diving. There are several dive centers in Marmaris that arrange guided diving trips, excursions and even provide diving lessons for the inexperienced individuals, eager to try out this underwater sport. Shopping is a delight in Marmaris. Some truly shop till they drop in this shopping Mecca! Leather goods of all kinds, natural sponges and the local blue glass beads (the Boncuk) are among the bargains to be found in the friendly little shops along the downtown bazaar. Charming boutiques at the end of the promenade offer kilims, carpets, sandals and embroidery as well as original fashions.

Day 71Port of Call Thira/Santorini Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Fira is a comparatively modern town, with houses built mostly during the 19th century when the old Venetian capital at Skaros became untenable due to earthquakes. The architecture is a jumble of Cycladic and Venetian, side by side, the similarities between the two being the stark whiteness. The impact of Aegean tourism has made itself felt in Fira, judging from the abundance of taverns, hotels, discotheques and shops. It is the largest town on the island and has gained preference with travelers because it is central and access to other parts of Santorini is made easy by either taxi or bus. From there you can indulge in some inspiring coastal walks. Wandering through the white cobbled streets of Fira, a town of about 2,000 inhabitants, one gets the feel of the old-world charm blended in with the modern day comforts. The town's archaeological museum is crammed with finds from excavations at Akrotiri. But besides being so interesting archaeologically, Santorini is essentially a beauty spot, an island whose cliffs seem to glow under an exceptionally clear light all day, but which at sunset glow redly, evoking that vast explosion more than 3000 years ago.

Day 72 Cruising
Day 73Port of Call Valletta Arrival 6:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

If you've ever wondered what sort of prize you'd get for saving Europe, look no further than Valletta. Named after La Valette, the Grandmaster who masterminded Malta's successful stand against the Turkish siege of 1565, Valletta became the city of the Knights of the Order of St John and the seat of Malta's government. While travelling through the Mediterranean, Sir Walter Scott described Valletta as 'the city built by gentlemen for gentlemen'. Today it's a beautifully preserved 16th-century walled city, small enough to cover in a few hours without sweating too much in the Mediterranean sun. In fact, the streets were carefully laid out to channel cool breezes in from the harbour. Situated on the northeast coast of Malta, Valletta is the capital, and is built on the promontory of Mount Sciberras which juts out into the middle of a bay. This dissects the bay into two deep harbours: the Grand Harbour to the east and the Marsamxett to the west. Valletta is a rough rectangle at the tip of a peninsula on the coast, just a few hundred metres across in either direction and thus surrounded by water on its northern, eastern and southern sides. The city was named after Jean Parisot de la Valette who was the Grand Master of the Order of the Knight Hospitallers (Knights of Saint John of Jerusalem). This famed religious order of hospitallers was founded in Jerusalem in the 11th century and made their base in Malta after they were expelled from Rhodes by the Ottoman Turks. During the time of Grand Master La Valette, in 1565, the Knights and the Maltese managed to suppress a siege on the island by the forces of Süleyman the Magnificent, Sultan of the Ottoman Empire in what was to become known as one of history's greatest sieges. Following the siege, the building of the city began in the same year 1565 in order to create a base for the defence of the island. Although Grand Master La Valette managed to lay the first stone, he died before its completion. Most of the embellishments of Valletta were done during the time of Grand Master La Cassiere, especially the magnificent St John's Co-Cathedral. The reign of the Knights of St John eventually came to an end with the successful invasion by Napoleon who occupied Malta on his way to Egypt. A Maltese revolt against the French garrison was the catalyst for the occupation of Valletta by the British in 1800. Valetta is also the spot where the Italian fleet surrendered to the Allies in 1943. Valletta's network of streets is laid out in an orthogonal grid dominated by a main artery which crosses the length of the entire city and opens up into a series of squares at its geometric centre, around the Palace of the Grand Masters. The city architecture is inspired by Italian Renaissance planning principles, and served as an early model of urban design. Valletta is one of the most important planned towns of the Renaissance. It equals in its noble architecture, any capital in Europe, while its timeless beauty and artistic treasures make it a well-deserved World Heritage site. There are a number of superb museums here as well as historical sites that are worth visiting. The main thoroughfare in the city is Republic Street. You'll find all the main shops and character-filled side streets leading off from here. For those interested in shopping, Merchant's Street and Lucia Street are the places to go for the most interesting merchandise. Lucia Street is famous for the exquisite silver and gold filigree jewellery sold there. Merchant Street specializes in souvenirs and is also home to a large open market.

Day 74Port of Call Trapani Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Trapani is a city in western Sicily with a crescent-shaped coastline. At the western tip, offering views as far as the Aegadian Islands, is the 17th-century Torre di Ligny watchtower. It houses the Museo di Preistoria e del Mare, with archeological artifacts. North of the harbor, the Chiesa del Purgatorio church holds wooden sculptures that are paraded around the city during Easter’s Processione dei Misteri.

Day 75Port of Call Cagliari Arrival 7:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Cagliari is the capital city of the Italian island of Sardinia. It’s known for the hilltop Castello, a medieval walled quarter situated high over the rest of the town. Architectural highlights include the 13th-century Cagliari Cathedral. Housed in a former arsenal, the Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Cagliari displays bronze objects, Roman ceramics and artifacts from the Nuragic age to the Byzantine era.

Day 76Port of Call Mahon Arrival 10:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

The capital of Menorca is the main port Mahon otherwise known as Mao. Mahon is a small town with a population of approximately 20,000. The ancient town of Mahon has an abundant amount of restaurants and fashionable shops. The harbour front is a popular area due it’s wide choice of restaurants and bars. The harbour of Mahon is over 5 kilometres wide and is one of the finest and deepest natural harbours in the world. Local to Mahon are many of the purpose built resorts including Punta Prima, Binidali, Cala en Porter, Sant Lluis and Cala d’Alcaufar. Mahon airport is approximately 5 kilometres from Mahon on the West side of the island. The airport has a number car renatl companies at the airports arrival hall. Tourist information about the island and where to stay is available from Menorca tourist office in the airport.

Day 77 Cruising
Day 78Port of Call Malaga Arrival 7:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Malaga is the major coastal city of Andalucia and is a genuine and typical Andaluz city with a gritty individualism untouched by tourism and, to a large extent, the passage of time. The Moors occupied the city until the mid fifteenth century, after which it grew to become one of the foremost merchant centres in the entire Iberian Peninsula. This illustrious past has left its imprint on the historic centre, particularly around La Alcazaba, a fortress which dates back to 1065 and is now a fascinating archaeological museum. Also worth a visit is the nearby castle which was rebuilt by the Moors and is today a traditional parador (state hotel) with superb panoramic views. During the nineteenth century, Malaga was a popular winter resort for the wealthy famed for its elegance and sophistication. The impressive park on Calle Alameda dates back to this era and is recognised as being one of the mostcelebrated botanical collections in Europe. During the winter, open air concerts are held here every Sunday which makes a refreshing change from the bucket and spade scenario on the coast. Pablo Picasso is the city’s famous son (not counting Antonio Banderas of course!) and there are several galleries showing his work, including the 16th century Museum of Fine Arts, adjacent to the Cathedral His birthplace in Plaza Merced is today an archive of his life and works and open tothe public; the entrance is absolutely free (so are all the services: Documentation Centre, exhibitions, museum, video projections...) Málaga's main theatre is the "Theatro Cervantes" where Antonio Banderas once trod the boards. He still visits. As well as being a cultural centre, Malaga is also a great place to eat out. The Malaguen´os love their food and the bars and restaurants here are where the real social life takes place. The choice in unlimited and, on the whole, reasonable with some bars offering a menu of the day with bread and wine for as little as 700 pesetas. Tapas, small portions of many different dishes is an Andalusian tradition and a wonderfully inexpensive way to try a variety of local food. The best known local fare in Malaga is pescaito frito, an assortment of fried fish, including small sardines and red mullet, best washed down with a glass of ice cold fino at one of the many old fashioned bodegas in town. But it is El Palo, to the east of the city which is a typical fisherman’s village and the place to go if you want that veritable ‘catch of the day’ freshness. In the centre try a tapas and a glass of Malaga wine at Malaga's oldest tapas bar called "Antigua Casa de la Guardia". Keep to the north side of the Alameda and find no. 16. Malaga is always closed for the siesta period, so this is a perfect time for a long relaxing lunch. These days, Malaga prides itself on being a modern city with the heart of commerce dominated by Calle Larios which is the local Bond Street equivalent. This is the recommended place to start exploring the city as it is surrounded by attractive small streets and plazas, as well as the magnificent cathedral (Renaissance cathedral with a Baroque façade and choir by Pedro de Mena) which offers daily guided tours. Garden lovers won't be disappointed in Malaga either. In the centre of the city is the beautiful Alameda Gardens, and just outside on the way to Antequera one finds the extensive Jardines de la Concepcion. Málaga airport is of course on of the major airports in Spain due to the number of tourist arrivals on charter flights from Northern Europe using Malaga airport as a gateway to the Costa del Sol.

Day 79Port of Call Portimao Arrival 10:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

It traces its origins back to a small trading port of the Phoenicians, Greeks and Carthaginians. Some historians have indicated that the place was originally the famous Portus Hannibalis named by the famous Roman general, Hannibal Barca. During the following Moorish occupation they renamed the place “Burj Munt”. Located at the mouth of the River Arade it provides a natural harbour and has at times been known in its past as a home for smugglers and pirates. The river also provides the sea access to the up-river ancient city of Silves which was the capital of the Algarve during the Moorish occupation.

Day 80Port of Call Lisbon Arrival 7:00am

Overview

Lisbon is Portugal’s hilly, coastal capital city. From imposing São Jorge Castle, the view encompasses the old city’s pastel-colored buildings, Tagus Estuary and Ponte 25 de Abril suspension bridge. Nearby, the National Azulejo Museum displays 5 centuries of decorative ceramic tiles. Just outside Lisbon is a string of Atlantic beaches, from Cascais to Estoril.

Onboard the Seven Seas Voyager

Costco Member Reviews

4.7 of 5 stars4.7/5 (131 Reviews)

Ship Rating

4.5/5

A trailblazer in the exclusive world of all-suite, all-balcony ships, Seven Seas Voyager® exceeds even the loftiest expectations for luxury. Considering her size, the amenities are surprisingly plentiful and include four main dining venues where you can dine wherever, whenever and with whomever you choose. With 447 international crew members attending to a maximum 700 guests, personal service is exceedingly indulgent throughout.

Onboard Activities

Activities & Services (included in cruise)

Fitness Center

  • Card Room
  • Disco/Nightclub
  • Movies
  • Fitness Center
  • Sauna/Steam Room
  • Educational Programs
  • Pool - Outdoor
  • Sports Facilities
  • Whirlpool/Jacuzzi
  • Bars/Lounges
  • Library
  • Wi-Fi
  • Organized Age Specific Activities
  • Teen Programs
  • Business Center
  • Concierge Desk
  • Dry Cleaning/ Laundry Service
  • Duty-Free Shops/Boutiques
  • Elevators

Activities & Services (available for an extra fee)

Full-Service Spa

  • Beauty Salon
  • Full-Service Spa
  • Infirmary/Medical Center

Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the cruise line without notice. Staterooms designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Dining

Compass Rose

Specialty Dining

Chartreuse: Featuring a classic French menu with a modern twist, Chartreuse evokes memories of a chic Parisian fine dining restaurant discovered during an evening stroll. Wherever you are seated in this regal restaurant, you will be treated to a succulent dinner while enjoying incredible ocean views. The restaurant ambiance is complemented by a menu that features dishes expertly prepared using both classic and modern techniques for a multiple course celebration of French gastronomy.

Compass Rose: Much thought was given to the design of Compass Rose, the flagship restaurant of Regent Seven Seas fleet. The dining room is outfitted with rich woods contrasted by light marble stones and mother of pearl shimmering brightly with an elegant color theme of light shades of blue, white, gold and silver. Compass Rose delights with a beautifully defined atmosphere and transitions from refreshing natural light during the day to a romantic ice blue lighting theme at night. This is the perfect setting for you to enjoy your breakfast, lunch and dinner, where the menu features an exceptional variety of Continental cuisine.

Prime 7: A true classic in every sense, Prime 7 sets a new standard in steakhouse fare with its contemporary interpretation of an American favorite. Handsomely decorated with supple leather wing-back chairs, burnished woods and rich earth-toned fabrics, Prime 7 exudes a distinct, intimate elegance. All the traditional starters are here, including Jumbo Lump Crab Cakes, Classic Steak Tartare, and Clam Chowder. Of course, beef is the undisputed star, and it is all USDA Prime and Dry-Aged at least 28 days to ensure the ultimate tenderness, juiciness and flavor. Prime New York Strip, Porterhouse Steak and succulent Filet Mignon only touch upon the selections. Mouthwatering alternatives include Alaskan King Crab Legs and Dover Sole. Prime 7 is open for dinner only and reservations are required.

Sette Mari at La Veranda: Each evening, La Veranda transforms into Sette Mari at La Veranda, a casual, intimate dining experience. Enjoy an extensive menu of authentic antipasti and Italian specialties served á la carte and paired with fine Italian wines — complimentary of course. Delectable dishes are prepared á la minute by talented chefs using only the freshest gourmet ingredients and served by attentive waiters. Sette Mari at La Veranda is open for dinner only.

 

Casual Dining

La Veranda Restaurant: Take in stunning ocean views while enjoying elegant breakfast and lunch buffets in the chic indoor dining room or al fresco on the shaded, open-air deck. Breakfasts include traditional favorites, as well as a made-to-order omelet station, a variety of fresh fruits and pastries, along with daily specials, like fluffy Belgian waffles with fresh blueberry compote. For lunch indulge in an array of choices from a bountiful salad bar, gourmet sandwiches, hot carving stations and delicious desserts.

Pool Grill: The Pool Grill is open-air, yet abundantly shaded for comfortable dining. Enjoy grilled-to-order burgers, grilled seafood, sandwiches, and fresh salads. Treat yourself to milkshakes and malts or an old-fashioned hand-dipped ice cream dessert sprinkled with all your favorite toppings.

Room Service: Complimentary 24-hour dining in the comfort of your stateroom.


Times, costs and other specifics are outside the control of Costco Travel. All information is at the sole discretion of the cruise line and is subject to change without notice. Dining time and table size preferences are submitted to the cruise line on a first-come, first-served request basis and are confirmed aboard ship. Questions, concerns and/or special needs regarding dining arrangements must be addressed with the maitre d' hotel aboard ship. Every effort is made to accommodate travelers' preferences; however, Costco Travel cannot guarantee dining arrangements. In specialty restaurants, space is limited and reservations are recommended. A cover charge and dress code may apply.

Staterooms

Features a European king-size bed, a sitting area, a marble bathroom, a walk-in closet and a balcony. Concierge Level is available.

Deluxe Suite (Category: H)

Category: H
356 sq.ft.; 306 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Deluxe Suite (Category: G)

Category: G
356 sq.ft.; 306 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Deluxe Suite (Category: F)

Category: F
356 sq.ft.; 306 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Spacious suites feature an in-suite iPad, daily canapés and upgraded bathroom amenities.

Penthouse Suite (Category: A)

Category: A
Penthouse Suites include Butler Service; 370 sq.ft.; 320 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Penthouse Suite (Category: B)

Category: B
Penthouse Suites include Butler Service; 370 sq.ft.; 320 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Penthouse Suite (Category: C)

Category: C
386 sq.ft.; 306 sq.ft.; Balcony: 115-198 sq.ft.

Concierge Suite (Category: D)

Category: D
356 sq.ft.; 306 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Concierge Suite (Category: E)

Category: E
356 sq.ft.; 306 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Master Suite (Category: MS)

Category: MS
2 bedrooms; Master Suites include Butler Service; 1335 sq.ft.; 1152 sq.ft.; Balcony: 183 sq.ft.

Grand Suite (Category: GS)

Category: GS
Butler service; 876 sq.ft.; 753 sq.ft.; Balcony: 123 sq.ft.

Voyager Suite (Category: VS)

Category: VS
Voyager Suites include butler service; 604 sq.ft.; 554 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Seven Seas Suite (Category: SS)

Category: SS
Seven Seas Suites include Butler Service; 545 sq.ft.; 495 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Deck Plan

Cruise Ship
Deck 12
Key to Symbols
SymbolDescription
Three guest capacity suite, convertible sofa bedThree guest capacity suite, convertible sofa bed
Wheelchair accessible suites have shower stall instead of bathtubWheelchair accessible suites have shower stall instead of bathtub
Connecting suitesConnecting suites
2-bedroom suite accommodates up to 6 guests2-bedroom suite accommodates up to 6 guests

Ship Facts

Seven Seas Voyager ship image
  • Ship Name: Seven Seas Voyager
  • Year Built: 2003
  • Year Refurbished: 2016
  • Year Entered Present Fleet: 2008
  • Ship Class: Mariner
  • Maximum Capacity: 700
  • Number of Passenger Decks: 9
  • Number of Crew: 447
  • Officers' Nationality: International
  • Tonnage (GRT): 42,363
  • Capacity Based on Double Occupancy: 700
  • Country of Registry: The Bahamas
  • Total Staterooms: 350
  • Suites with Balcony: 350
  • Crew/Hotel Staff Nationality: European/International
Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the hotel, resort or cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the provider without notice. Hotels, resorts, ships or accommodations designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Reviews

Available Dates & Prices

Departure Date

Inside Stateroom

Ocean View Stateroom

Balcony Stateroom

Suite Stateroom

Departure Date - 06/28/2024

Inside Stateroom

N/A

Ocean View Stateroom

N/A

Balcony Stateroom

$64,819

Suite Stateroom

$73,569

Terms & Conditions

*Price shown is per person based on double occupancy, is valid for select stateroom categories only, and does include government taxes/fees and gratuities. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for details.

**Select complimentary shore excursions are for full-fare guests only, capacity controlled and subject to availability. Shore excursion reservations are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. Please note, available excursions vary by sailing date and day of the week. Government fees and taxes are included. Requested excursions may not be available at time of booking. Supplement will apply on Regent Choice excursions and excludes Private Arrangements and all Adventures Ashore programs. Restrictions apply and penalties apply 36 hours prior to shore excursion start date.

††All shipboard credit is in U.S. dollars, is per stateroom based on double occupancy, has no cash value, is nontransferable and not redeemable for cash.

†The exact amount of the Costco Shop Card will be calculated during the booking process. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for additional information.

Ship's registry: The Bahamas

    Package ID: RSSVOYWOR20240628