Asia Africa and Middle East: Japan Intensive Voyage

Azamara

After a relaxing day sailing aboard your boutique hotel at sea, a late stay means lots of time to explore Hakodate's natural beauty and incredible urban layout, the pinnacle of which might be Goryōkaku, a sprawling star fort on the island of Hokkaido. Next you'll explore Japan's main island, Honshu. In Aomori, year-round festival floats fill the waters near the Nebuta Warasse museum. Hirosaki Castle, constructed in 1611 and surrounded by over 2,600 cherry trees, is another must-see before sailing to Akita, home to the famous Lake Tazawa hot springs and the wooden samurai mansions of historic Kakunodate town. After Kanazawa and Sakaiminato, cross the Korea Strait for a late stay in Busan, where ancient culture and modern life merge in South Korea's second-largest city. Following late stays in both Kitakyushu and Hiroshima, and unwind while cruising the inland Sea of Japan, be sure to sample Takamatsu's famous noodle dish, Sanuki udon, before an exciting overnight in Kobe. Known for the beef delicacy that bears its name, explore Kobe's spectacular shogun and emperor shrines, temples, and palaces. In Shimizu, gaze in awe at Mount Fuji, Japan's tallest peak, overlooking this beautiful town, then conclude your intensive Japanese voyage with an overnight back in Tokyo.

Included Extras

  • AzAmazing Evenings® event (on most voyages of seven nights or longer)

  • Select standard spirits, international beers and wines

  • Bottled water, soft drinks, specialty coffees and teas

  • Self-service laundry

  • Shuttle service to and from port communities where available

  • Concierge services for personal guidance and reservations

  • Gratuities

Executive Member Benefit

  • Executive Members earn an annual 2% Reward on Costco Travel purchases

Costco Shop Card

  • Member Exclusive: Costco Shop Card with every Azamara sailing†

Sailing Itinerary

Note: Cruise itineraries are subject to change. Please verify ports and times directly with the cruise line.

Day 1Port of Call TokyoDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Describing Tokyo to someone who has never been here is a formidable task. After all, how do you describe a city that--as one of my friends visiting Tokyo for the first time put it--seems like it's part of another planet? To be sure, Tokyo is very different from Western capitals, but what really sets it apart is its people. Approximately 12 million people reside within Tokyo's 1,200,000,000 sq. km (800 sq. miles), and almost one-fourth of Japan's total population lives within commuting distance of the city. This translates into a crush of humanity that packs the subways, crowds the sidewalks, and fills the department stores beyond belief. In some parts of the city, the streets are as crowded at 3am as they are at 3pm. With its high-energy, visual overload, Tokyo makes even New York seem like a sleepy, laid-back town. And yet, despite its limited space for harmonious living, Tokyo remains one of the safest cities in the world, with remarkably little crime or violence. No matter how lost I may become, I know that people will go out of their way to help me. Hardworking, honest, and helpful to strangers, the Japanese are their country's greatest asset. With Tokyo so densely packed, it comes as no shock to learn that land here is more valuable than gold and that buildings are built practically on top of each other, shaped like pieces in a jigsaw puzzle to fit the existing plots of real estate. More than perhaps any other city in the world, Japan's capital is a concrete jungle, with a few parks but not many trees to break the monotony, and it stretches on and on as far as the eye can see. Fires, earthquakes, wars, the zeal for modernization, and the price of land have taken their toll on the city, eradicating almost all evidence of previous centuries. It's as though Tokyo was born only this morning, with all the messy aftermath of a city conceived without plan and interested only in the future. Thus, first-time visitors to Tokyo are almost invariably disappointed. They come expecting an exotic Asian city, but instead find a megalopolis Westernized to the point of drabness. Used to the grand edifices and monuments of Western cities, they look in vain for Tokyo's own monuments to its past--ancient temples, exquisite gardens, imperial palaces, or whatever else they've imagined. Instead they find what may be, quite arguably, one of the ugliest cities in the world. So, while Tokyo is one of my favorite cities, it's an appreciation that came only with time. When I first moved here, I was tormented by the unsettling feeling that I was somehow missing out on the "real" Tokyo. Even though I was living and working here, Tokyo seemed beyond my grasp, elusive, vague, and undefined. I felt that the meaning of the city was out there somewhere, if only I knew where to look. With time, I finally learned that I needn't look farther than my own front window. Tokyo has no center, but rather is made up of a series of small towns and neighborhoods clustered together, each with its own history, flavor, and atmosphere. There are narrow residential streets, ma-and-pa shops, fruit stands, and stores. There's the neighborhood tofu factory, the lunch-box stand, grocery shop, and the tiny police station, where the cops know the residents by name and patrol the area by bicycle. There are carefully pruned bonsai trees gracing sidewalks, women in kimono bowing and shuffling down streets, and wooden homes on impossibly narrow streets. Walk in the old downtown neighborhoods of Asakusa or Yanaka and you're worlds apart from the trendy quarters of Harajuku or the high-rises of Shinjuku. Neighborhoods like these make Tokyo lovable and livable. What's more, once visitors get to know Tokyo better, they learn that you can't judge Tokyo by what it looks like on the outside, for this is a city of interiors. Even those concrete monsters may house interiors that are fascinating in design and innovation. In the basement of that drab building could well be a restaurant with wooden beams, mud walls, and thatched ceiling, imported intact from a farmhouse in the Japan Alps; on its roof could be a small Shinto shrine, while the top floor could house a high-tech bar or a sophisticated French restaurant. And beneath Tokyo's concrete shell is a thriving cultural life left very much intact. In fact, if you're interested in Japan's performing arts as well as such diverse activities as the tea ceremony or sumo, Tokyo is your best bet for offering the most at any one time. Tokyo is also rich in museums and claims the largest repository of Japanese art in the world. It also gets my vote as the pop-art capital of the world; if you're into kitsch, you'll be in high heaven. I can't imagine being bored here, even for just a minute.

Day 2 Cruising
Day 3Port of Call Hakodate Arrival 8:00amDeparture 10:00pm

Overview

Hakodate is a city and port located in Oshima. It is the capital city of Oshima Sub prefecture. The city is overlooked by Hakodateyama (Mount Hakodate), a lumpy, totally-forested mountain. The summit of the mountain is easily reached by either hiking trail cable car, or car. The nighttime view from the summit is renowned all over Japan as one of the loveliest sights in the country. A not-so-well known local nickname of the bumpy mountain is Gagyuzan ("Mount Cow's-back"), which alludes to the way the mountain's shape resembles that of a resting cow. Hakodate is home to the famous European-style Goryokaku fort, which was built in the shape of a five-pointed star in 1866. It is now used as a public park. The park is a popular spot in Hokkaido for hanami (cherry blossom viewing). The small but bustling city is also famous as the site of Hijikata Toshizo's last stand. The city is also known for Hakodate Shio Ramen, where instead of having pork cutlet placed inside the soup, sliced squid is used. On a similar note, Hakodate's city fish is the squid. Every year (around July) the city gets together for the Hakodate Port Festival. Hordes of citizens gather in the streets to dance a wiggly dance known as the Ika-odori (Squid Dance), the name of which describes the dance appropriately. The glowing lights of squid-catching boats can be seen in the waters surrounding the city.

Day 4Port of Call Aomori Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

The city of Aomori owes its development to its unique position as transportation and distribution hub for the north of Japan. This vital factor also holds out great promise for continued urban development as Aomori heads into the 21st century. With a population of about 290,000, Aomori is an attractive modern city, bordered on one side by the Hakkoda mountain range and on the other by the sea and a fine natural harbor. Sitting at the southern end of the international waters of the Tsugaru Straits, Aomori is situated at approximately the same latitude as New York, Beijing, and Rome. As one of Japan's Northern urban centers, Aomori hopes to play an international role in circulating information about life in snowy regions.

Day 5Port of Call Akita Arrival 8:00amDeparture 2:00pm

Overview

Akita is the capital city of Akita Prefecture, Japan, and has been designated a core city since 1 April 1997.The area of present-day Akita was part of ancient Dewa Province, and has been inhabited for thousands of years.

Day 6Port of Call Kanazawa Arrival 9:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Kanazawa is a castle town that was ruled over by the Maeda family for three centuries after the first lord Toshiie Maeda entered Kanazawa Castle in 1583. The development of its special products like rice, sake, sweets, etc. was due to its temperate and rainy climate with heavy snow in winter. The city is surrounded by the Japan Alps, Hakusan National Park and Noto Peninsula National Park. Two rivers run through the city; the Sai is said to be a lively masculine river and the Asano to be a sweet, feminine river. Such a natural background of great beauty gives the city a relaxed feeling. Since the Kaga Clan invited many artists and craftsmen to this area, it achieved a high level of craftsmanship that continues to flourish to this day. The buildings that gave birth to these traditions stand tranquilly and blend in with the modern atmosphere in Kanazawa to create a charming ancient castle town.

Day 7Port of Call Sakaiminato Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:30pm

Overview

The smallest city in Tottori, Sakaiminato City has only 37,392 (2004) people living there. It's located on the western most section of coast in Tottori on Yumigahama Peninsula which encloses the Sea of Naka behind it. Thus, the city is surrounded by water on three sides and Yonago City to its east. Miho Airbase (JSDF) which also doubles as Yonago Airport is located in Sakaiminato. Its citizens rejected an attempt to merge with Yonago City.

Day 8Port of Call Busan Arrival 9:00amDeparture 10:00pm

Overview

Busan/Pusan is Korea's second largest city. Tourists often come to this region to hike and to visit the Buddhist Temples located deep within the region's mountains. The Beomeosa Temple, founded in 678 AD, is perhaps one of the most frequented temples in the area and is always packed with worshipers and tourists. For art buffs, Busan offers several museums and historical buildings. If scenery is your thing, try visiting the Dongbaek Island, or bird watch at the Nakdong river estuary.

Day 9Port of Call Kitakyushu Arrival 8:00amDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

Kitakyushu is one of two designated cities in Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan, together with Fukuoka, with a population of about 1 million.

Day 10Port of Call Hiroshima Arrival 8:00amDeparture 10:00pm

Overview

Hiroshima City facing the Hiroshima Bay in the Seto Inland Sea is one of the most prominent cities in the Chugoku region, and a center of the administration and economy of Hiroshima. Six rivers flow through the city, so it is also called the "city of water." It was devastated by an atomic bomb in World War II. All structures vanished, but one miraculously remained standing. It is called the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome, and Hiroshima is internationally known as the city of peace. Hiroshima developed as a castle town after a feudal lord, Mori Terumoto, built Hiroshima Castle in the 16th century. Hiroshima Castle is also called Ri-jo, or Carp Castle, because the exterior painted in black resembles a black carp. There are a number of must-see places, such as the Shukukei-en Garden, or a miniature scenery garden, so named because there is a miniature version of Lake Xiyu (West Lake) in Hangzhou in China and many other miniatures of scenic sights, and the old Mitaki-dera Temple built in 809. The red Taho-to Tower in the Mitaki-dera Temple was transferred from a shrine in Wakayama as a memorial tower for the victims of the atomic bomb attack. Hiroshima also offers gastronomical pleasure, including oysters the culture of which has been going on since 1673 and okonomi-yaki Hiroshima style, unique flour crepes fried with vegetables and noodles that are different at each restaurant.

Day 11Inland Sea

Overview

Inland Sea is located between Honshu, Shikoku, and Kyushu islands. It is linked to the Sea of Japan by a narrow channel. The shallow sea is dotted with more than 950 islands, the largest of which is Awaji-shima. The shores of the Inland Sea are heavily populated and are part of Japan's most important industrial belt. Many industrial cities line the sea from the Osaka-Kobe complex on the east to the northern Kyushu industrial complex on the west. Many of Japan's greatest ports, including Osaka, Kobe, and Hiroshima are there. The Inland Sea is also famed for its scenic beauty and is the site of Inland Sea (Seto-naikai) National Park (255 sq mi/660 sq km; est. 1934) which includes some 600 islands and coastal segments.

Day 11Port of Call Takamatsu Arrival 12:00pmDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

Takamatsu is in the central part of Kagawa Prefecture, in north-eastern Shikoku, Japan. It faces the Seto Inland Sea National Park and is surrounded by hills and small mountains in the suburbs. Takamatsu City is blessed with mild weather, characterized by little change in temperature and very dry climate except for heavy rainfalls during the rainy and typhoon seasons, which combine to make it comfortable to live throughout the year. A dense fog peculiar to the Seto Inland Sea region, often sets in spring through early summer. Takamatsu has many historic sites. In 1588, Takamatsu Castle, the castle of a feudal lord was built. It became the 40th city of Japan in 1890 and has since enlarged its municipal area and grown in population by incorporating towns and villages around the city. On July 4th, 1945, the city was damaged by an air-raid by the Allied Troops. Every year in mid-August, domestic and international tourists come to enjoy Takamatsu Festival. Ritsurin Park is one of the famous tourist spots here. This landscape garden used to be a villa of the feudal lord of Sanuki Province. The harmonious arrangement of rocks, water and greenery, with refined teahouses, artistically laid out in the park, is bound to purify visitors' souls. Another must-see for a tourist in Takamatsu would be the Yashima Plateau. The top of the hill commands a superb view of the Bisan Seto Inland Sea, which boasts the beauty of numerous islands. Tamamo Park used to be the home of feudal lords whose castle was protected by the water filled moats on three sides. The park has an abundance of trees and flowers in every season which makes it a pleasure for visitors enjoying the sea breeze.

Day 12Port of Call Kobe Arrival 8:00am

Overview

Kobe lies on the south coast of southwestern Honshu Island, on Osaka Bay, near the city of Osaka. Behind the narrow coastal site of the city are mountains on which suburban residences and hotels have been built. Hyogo, which is now part of Kobe, had for centuries been a major Japanese port trading with China and Korea and benefited in the 1860s, when Japan was re-opened to foreign trade. Since the 1890s several adjoining cities, including Hyogo, have been absorbed by Kobe. Following the 1995 earthquake tragedy, Kobe Phoenix Plaza became a help centre and now features a collection of photographs that reveal the devastating force of the earthquake . Kitano-cho is Kobe’s former foreigner’s quarter and features restored buildings now used as museums. boutiques and restaurants. The district has a synagogue, a mosque, and a Russian Orthodox cathedral. Meriken Park houses the Maritime Museum and nearby Kobe Tower. The city has Christian churches, Shinto and Buddhist temples and shrines, two famous statues of Buddha, a fine arts museum, and a municipal museum with a collection on Western cultural contact. Nearby is the city of Himeji and the stunning Himeji Castle (Shirasagi-jo), begun in the 14th century and now designated a National Treasure of Japan and UNESCO World Heritage Site. From here tourists can also visit Osaka, Kyoto, Nara and Sorakuen Garden.

Day 13Port of Call KobeDeparture 1:30pm

Overview

Kobe lies on the south coast of southwestern Honshu Island, on Osaka Bay, near the city of Osaka. Behind the narrow coastal site of the city are mountains on which suburban residences and hotels have been built. Hyogo, which is now part of Kobe, had for centuries been a major Japanese port trading with China and Korea and benefited in the 1860s, when Japan was re-opened to foreign trade. Since the 1890s several adjoining cities, including Hyogo, have been absorbed by Kobe. Following the 1995 earthquake tragedy, Kobe Phoenix Plaza became a help centre and now features a collection of photographs that reveal the devastating force of the earthquake . Kitano-cho is Kobe’s former foreigner’s quarter and features restored buildings now used as museums. boutiques and restaurants. The district has a synagogue, a mosque, and a Russian Orthodox cathedral. Meriken Park houses the Maritime Museum and nearby Kobe Tower. The city has Christian churches, Shinto and Buddhist temples and shrines, two famous statues of Buddha, a fine arts museum, and a municipal museum with a collection on Western cultural contact. Nearby is the city of Himeji and the stunning Himeji Castle (Shirasagi-jo), begun in the 14th century and now designated a National Treasure of Japan and UNESCO World Heritage Site. From here tourists can also visit Osaka, Kyoto, Nara and Sorakuen Garden.

Day 14Port of Call Shimizu Arrival 10:30amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Blessed with a mild climate throughout the year, Shimizu is known for producing mandarin oranges, tea, and strawberries. On the coast, there is a pine-tree grove on a sand spit called Miho no Matsubara and which is often mentioned in legends. From the small mountain called Nihondaira tourists can enjoy a superb view of Mt. Fuji and the light-filled city at night. Picking strawberries during the winter and spring months is a popular pastime.

Day 15Port of Call Tokyo Arrival 8:00am

Overview

Describing Tokyo to someone who has never been here is a formidable task. After all, how do you describe a city that--as one of my friends visiting Tokyo for the first time put it--seems like it's part of another planet? To be sure, Tokyo is very different from Western capitals, but what really sets it apart is its people. Approximately 12 million people reside within Tokyo's 1,200,000,000 sq. km (800 sq. miles), and almost one-fourth of Japan's total population lives within commuting distance of the city. This translates into a crush of humanity that packs the subways, crowds the sidewalks, and fills the department stores beyond belief. In some parts of the city, the streets are as crowded at 3am as they are at 3pm. With its high-energy, visual overload, Tokyo makes even New York seem like a sleepy, laid-back town. And yet, despite its limited space for harmonious living, Tokyo remains one of the safest cities in the world, with remarkably little crime or violence. No matter how lost I may become, I know that people will go out of their way to help me. Hardworking, honest, and helpful to strangers, the Japanese are their country's greatest asset. With Tokyo so densely packed, it comes as no shock to learn that land here is more valuable than gold and that buildings are built practically on top of each other, shaped like pieces in a jigsaw puzzle to fit the existing plots of real estate. More than perhaps any other city in the world, Japan's capital is a concrete jungle, with a few parks but not many trees to break the monotony, and it stretches on and on as far as the eye can see. Fires, earthquakes, wars, the zeal for modernization, and the price of land have taken their toll on the city, eradicating almost all evidence of previous centuries. It's as though Tokyo was born only this morning, with all the messy aftermath of a city conceived without plan and interested only in the future. Thus, first-time visitors to Tokyo are almost invariably disappointed. They come expecting an exotic Asian city, but instead find a megalopolis Westernized to the point of drabness. Used to the grand edifices and monuments of Western cities, they look in vain for Tokyo's own monuments to its past--ancient temples, exquisite gardens, imperial palaces, or whatever else they've imagined. Instead they find what may be, quite arguably, one of the ugliest cities in the world. So, while Tokyo is one of my favorite cities, it's an appreciation that came only with time. When I first moved here, I was tormented by the unsettling feeling that I was somehow missing out on the "real" Tokyo. Even though I was living and working here, Tokyo seemed beyond my grasp, elusive, vague, and undefined. I felt that the meaning of the city was out there somewhere, if only I knew where to look. With time, I finally learned that I needn't look farther than my own front window. Tokyo has no center, but rather is made up of a series of small towns and neighborhoods clustered together, each with its own history, flavor, and atmosphere. There are narrow residential streets, ma-and-pa shops, fruit stands, and stores. There's the neighborhood tofu factory, the lunch-box stand, grocery shop, and the tiny police station, where the cops know the residents by name and patrol the area by bicycle. There are carefully pruned bonsai trees gracing sidewalks, women in kimono bowing and shuffling down streets, and wooden homes on impossibly narrow streets. Walk in the old downtown neighborhoods of Asakusa or Yanaka and you're worlds apart from the trendy quarters of Harajuku or the high-rises of Shinjuku. Neighborhoods like these make Tokyo lovable and livable. What's more, once visitors get to know Tokyo better, they learn that you can't judge Tokyo by what it looks like on the outside, for this is a city of interiors. Even those concrete monsters may house interiors that are fascinating in design and innovation. In the basement of that drab building could well be a restaurant with wooden beams, mud walls, and thatched ceiling, imported intact from a farmhouse in the Japan Alps; on its roof could be a small Shinto shrine, while the top floor could house a high-tech bar or a sophisticated French restaurant. And beneath Tokyo's concrete shell is a thriving cultural life left very much intact. In fact, if you're interested in Japan's performing arts as well as such diverse activities as the tea ceremony or sumo, Tokyo is your best bet for offering the most at any one time. Tokyo is also rich in museums and claims the largest repository of Japanese art in the world. It also gets my vote as the pop-art capital of the world; if you're into kitsch, you'll be in high heaven. I can't imagine being bored here, even for just a minute.

Day 16Tokyo

Overview

Describing Tokyo to someone who has never been here is a formidable task. After all, how do you describe a city that--as one of my friends visiting Tokyo for the first time put it--seems like it's part of another planet? To be sure, Tokyo is very different from Western capitals, but what really sets it apart is its people. Approximately 12 million people reside within Tokyo's 1,200,000,000 sq. km (800 sq. miles), and almost one-fourth of Japan's total population lives within commuting distance of the city. This translates into a crush of humanity that packs the subways, crowds the sidewalks, and fills the department stores beyond belief. In some parts of the city, the streets are as crowded at 3am as they are at 3pm. With its high-energy, visual overload, Tokyo makes even New York seem like a sleepy, laid-back town. And yet, despite its limited space for harmonious living, Tokyo remains one of the safest cities in the world, with remarkably little crime or violence. No matter how lost I may become, I know that people will go out of their way to help me. Hardworking, honest, and helpful to strangers, the Japanese are their country's greatest asset. With Tokyo so densely packed, it comes as no shock to learn that land here is more valuable than gold and that buildings are built practically on top of each other, shaped like pieces in a jigsaw puzzle to fit the existing plots of real estate. More than perhaps any other city in the world, Japan's capital is a concrete jungle, with a few parks but not many trees to break the monotony, and it stretches on and on as far as the eye can see. Fires, earthquakes, wars, the zeal for modernization, and the price of land have taken their toll on the city, eradicating almost all evidence of previous centuries. It's as though Tokyo was born only this morning, with all the messy aftermath of a city conceived without plan and interested only in the future. Thus, first-time visitors to Tokyo are almost invariably disappointed. They come expecting an exotic Asian city, but instead find a megalopolis Westernized to the point of drabness. Used to the grand edifices and monuments of Western cities, they look in vain for Tokyo's own monuments to its past--ancient temples, exquisite gardens, imperial palaces, or whatever else they've imagined. Instead they find what may be, quite arguably, one of the ugliest cities in the world. So, while Tokyo is one of my favorite cities, it's an appreciation that came only with time. When I first moved here, I was tormented by the unsettling feeling that I was somehow missing out on the "real" Tokyo. Even though I was living and working here, Tokyo seemed beyond my grasp, elusive, vague, and undefined. I felt that the meaning of the city was out there somewhere, if only I knew where to look. With time, I finally learned that I needn't look farther than my own front window. Tokyo has no center, but rather is made up of a series of small towns and neighborhoods clustered together, each with its own history, flavor, and atmosphere. There are narrow residential streets, ma-and-pa shops, fruit stands, and stores. There's the neighborhood tofu factory, the lunch-box stand, grocery shop, and the tiny police station, where the cops know the residents by name and patrol the area by bicycle. There are carefully pruned bonsai trees gracing sidewalks, women in kimono bowing and shuffling down streets, and wooden homes on impossibly narrow streets. Walk in the old downtown neighborhoods of Asakusa or Yanaka and you're worlds apart from the trendy quarters of Harajuku or the high-rises of Shinjuku. Neighborhoods like these make Tokyo lovable and livable. What's more, once visitors get to know Tokyo better, they learn that you can't judge Tokyo by what it looks like on the outside, for this is a city of interiors. Even those concrete monsters may house interiors that are fascinating in design and innovation. In the basement of that drab building could well be a restaurant with wooden beams, mud walls, and thatched ceiling, imported intact from a farmhouse in the Japan Alps; on its roof could be a small Shinto shrine, while the top floor could house a high-tech bar or a sophisticated French restaurant. And beneath Tokyo's concrete shell is a thriving cultural life left very much intact. In fact, if you're interested in Japan's performing arts as well as such diverse activities as the tea ceremony or sumo, Tokyo is your best bet for offering the most at any one time. Tokyo is also rich in museums and claims the largest repository of Japanese art in the world. It also gets my vote as the pop-art capital of the world; if you're into kitsch, you'll be in high heaven. I can't imagine being bored here, even for just a minute.

Onboard the Azamara Journey

Ship Rating

4.0 of 5 stars

Costco Member Rating:
4.4/5 (237 Ratings)

Azamara Journey® features more balconies than many cruise ships and butler service in each suite. Like it's sister ship, Quest, it's a mid-sized beauty with a deck plan well-suited to the needs of modern voyagers.

Onboard Activities

Activities & Services (included in cruise)

Pool - Outdoor

  • Card Room
  • Casino
  • Theater/Show Lounge
  • Fitness Center
  • Sauna/Steam Room
  • Pool - Outdoor
  • Whirlpool/Jacuzzi
  • Bars/Lounges
  • Business Center
  • Concierge Desk
  • Duty-Free Shops/Boutiques
  • Elevators
  • Safe Deposit Boxes

Activities & Services (available for an extra fee)

Full-Service Spa

  • Beauty Salon
  • Fitness Classes
  • Full-Service Spa
  • Internet Center
  • Dry Cleaning/ Laundry Service
  • Infirmary/Medical Center
  • Self-Service Laundromat

Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the cruise line without notice. Staterooms designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Dining

Discoveries

Main Dining

Discoveries Restaurant (open seating): Discover the world through dishes and flavors from the places you visit. Whether it’s a Destination Immersion dinner buffet or the Destination Immersion cuisine on the dinner menu, give your dining a little local flavor and enjoy on shore tastes onboard! You will also enjoy a wide variety of nightly selections such as filet mignon with black truffle sauce. With its elegant yet lively dining and renewed décor, it’s easy to see why this restaurant is the culinary heart of the ship. Reservations are not accepted. Choose being seated at a table for two or as part of a larger group of fellow guests.

Prime C

Specialty Dining

Aqualina: At Aqualina, you’ll find some of Italy’s most celebrated dishes as well as contemporary inventive cuisine. Start with lobster ravioli, followed by arugula and radicchio with prosciutto chips, and a Venetian seafood platter. You won’t be able to say no to these famous desserts: marsala custard, lemon soufflé, or tiramisu. The chefs love to be inspired, so after an on shore visit to a local market, you can also expect a delectable dish so local, you’ll feel like you’re not onboard anymore.

Prime C: At Prime C, you’re in for more than an array of delectable dining such as steaks cooked to perfection, crab cakes with remoulade, lobster bisque, lamb, game hens and seafood. Last but certainly not least, try the mini cinnamon-sugar donuts with dipping sauces for dessert. Expect a marvelous evening in a warm wood-paneled ambiance with stunning views and lush décor. If the chef has made a visit to a local market while in port, you’ll also have an authentic local dish to look forward to.

Specialty Dining: Guests staying in a suite are welcome to dine any night of the voyage in Aqualina or Prime C at no charge. Guests who have booked a Club Veranda, Club Oceanview, or Club Interior stateroom are subject to a USD 30 per-person cover charge in Aqualina or Prime C.

Windows Café

Casual Dining

Windows Café: The best way to see where you are in the world is not by looking at your itinerary, but by checking out the menu at Windows Café! The daily themed dinner often takes its inspiration from the region you are visiting. There’s even a live station made from local ingredients purchased in port: Greek salad made with local feta (Greece), pasta prepared with local mushrooms (Italy), fresh Mussels served with garlic bread (Netherlands). Take in the fresh breeze at an outdoor table and relax in the easy and casual atmosphere of the newly renovated Windows Café. Enjoy an intimate breakfast, lunch, or dinner for two or a lively meal for six with flexible seating options. And speaking of choices, selections change daily. Choose from fresh sushi, stir-fry and pasta, salads, smoked lox and other cold fish, a carving station and of course, desserts.

The Patio: Casual “pool grill” by day, then fine tablecloths and flickering candles will set the mood for a sit-down al fresco dining experience by night. Taste your way around the world with exclusive personalized dishes using local flavors of the places visited on the Destination Immersion® cuisine dinner menu served by professional wait staff.

Mosaic Café: Comfortable and stylish, Mosaic is the place where you’ll find your favorite coffee drinks, just the way you like (for an additional fee). Slip into a comfortable seat and sip for a while. The perfect place to start (or end) your day, no matter where you are in the world. This just might become your favorite area on the ship.

Room Service: Room service is available 24-hours a day. Order from the full breakfast menu between 6:30 AM and 10:00 AM, and have it delivered at your appointed time. Lunch and dinner room service features a menu of hearty soups, fresh salads, gourmet sandwiches, pizzas and desserts.


Times, costs and other specifics are outside the control of Costco Travel. All information is at the sole discretion of the cruise line and is subject to change without notice. Dining time and table size preferences are submitted to the cruise line on a first-come, first-served request basis and are confirmed aboard ship. Questions, concerns and/or special needs regarding dining arrangements must be addressed with the maitre d' hotel aboard ship. Every effort is made to accommodate travelers' preferences; however, Costco Travel cannot guarantee dining arrangements. In specialty restaurants, space is limited and reservations are recommended. A cover charge and dress code may apply.

Staterooms

Alluring inside staterooms feature modern amenities, furnishings and European linens.

Club Interior Stateroom (Category: 12)

Category: 12

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • 40" flat-screen television
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Interior Stateroom (Category: 11)

Category: 11

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • 40" flat-screen television
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Interior Stateroom (Category: 10)

Category: 10

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • 40" flat-screen television
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Interior Stateroom (Category: 09)

Category: 09

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • 40" flat-screen television
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Guarantee - Inside (Category: Z)

Category: Z
This category can be booked for a special rate, guaranteed to you. Please note that the category is not associated at the time of booking with a specific stateroom, deck, bedding configuration or other particular settings. The assignment of an actual cabin will be performed during your check-in. The cabin can be anywhere on the ship.

Attractive staterooms feature an ocean view or an obstructed view, with either a picture window or a porthole, plus standard features and amenities.

Club Oceanview Stateroom (obstructed view) (Category: 08)

Category: 08

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • Some staterooms feature sofa bed
  • 40" flat-screen TV
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Oceanview Stateroom (Category: 06)

Category: 06

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • Some staterooms feature sofa bed
  • 40" flat-screen TV
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Oceanview Stateroom (Category: 05)

Category: 05

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • Some staterooms feature sofa bed
  • 40" flat-screen TV
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Oceanview Stateroom (Category: 04)

Category: 04

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • Some staterooms feature sofa bed
  • 40" flat-screen TV
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Guarantee - Oceanview (Category: Y)

Category: Y
This category can be booked for a special rate, guaranteed to you. Please note that the category is not associated at the time of booking with a specific stateroom, deck, bedding configuration or other particular settings. The assignment of an actual cabin will be performed during your check-in. The cabin can be anywhere on the ship.

Elegantly appointed staterooms feature modern amenities and furnishings, a veranda, a sitting area with sofa bed and floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors.

Club Veranda Stateroom (Category: V1)

Category: V1

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • Sitting area with 40" flat-screen TV
  • Veranda
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Veranda Stateroom (Category: V2)

Category: V2

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • Sitting area with 40" flat-screen TV
  • Veranda
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Veranda Stateroom (Category: V3)

Category: V3

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • Sitting area with 40" flat-screen TV
  • Veranda
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Guarantee - Balcony (Category: X)

Category: X
This category can be booked for a special rate, guaranteed to you. Please note that the category is not associated at the time of booking with a specific stateroom, deck, bedding configuration or other particular settings. The assignment of an actual cabin will be performed during your check-in. The cabin can be anywhere on the ship.

Suite amenities include butler service, limited internet minutes, specialty dining, free bag of laundry, in-suite tea service, and an additional onboard credit for Top Suites

Club Ocean Suite (Category: CO)

Category: CO

  • Completely refurbished with elegant contemporary décor in 2016
  • Spacious living room with a separate master bedroom
  • Master bedroom with one queen size bed and a 55" flat-screen television
  • 55" flat-screen television in living room
  • Marble master bathroom with shower. Journey and Quest suites feature a tub.
  • Dressing room with vanity and ample closet space
  • Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors in living room and master bedroom
  • Spacious 233 sq.ft. (21.7 sq.m.) veranda
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hair dryer

Club World Owner’s Suite (Category: CW)

Category: CW

  • Completely refurbished with elegant contemporary décor in 2016
  • Spacious living room with a separate master bedroom
  • Master bedroom with one queen size bed and a 40" flat-screen television
  • 55" flat-screen television in living room
  • Marble master bathroom with shower. Journey and Quest suites feature a tub.
  • Dressing room with vanity and ample closet space
  • Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors in living room and master bedroom
  • Spacious 233 sq.ft. (21.7 sq.m.) veranda
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hair dryer

Club Continent Suite (Category: N1)

Category: N1

  • Completely refurbished with elegant contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one queen size bed
  • Spacious and comfortable sitting area
  • 55" flat-screen television in sitting area
  • Roomy bathroom with shower. Some also feature a tub.
  • Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors
  • Veranda
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hair dryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Continent Suite (Category: N2)

Category: N2

  • Completely refurbished with elegant contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one queen size bed
  • Spacious and comfortable sitting area
  • 55" flat-screen television in sitting area
  • Roomy bathroom with shower. Some also feature a tub.
  • Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors
  • Veranda
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hair dryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Spa Suite (Category: SP)

Category: SP

  • Newly built suites in 2016 with an elegant organic décor
  • Two lower beds convertible to one queen size bed
  • Spacious glass-enclosed bathtub
  • Separate rain shower
  • Comfortable sitting area
  • 55" flat-screen television in sitting area
  • Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors
  • Veranda
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hair dryer

Guarantee - Suite (Category: W)

Category: W
This category can be booked for a special rate, guaranteed to you. Please note that the category is not associated at the time of booking with a specific stateroom, deck, bedding configuration or other particular settings. The assignment of an actual cabin will be performed during your check-in. The cabin can be anywhere on the ship.

Deck Plan

Cruise Ship
Deck 11
Key to Symbols
SymbolDescription
Wheelchair-Accessible StateroomWheelchair-Accessible Stateroom
Convertible Sofa BedConvertible Sofa Bed
Connecting StateroomsConnecting Staterooms
Interior Stateroom Door LocationInterior Stateroom Door Location
Smoking AreaSmoking Area
Suite with tubSuite with tub

Ship Facts

Azamara Journey ship image
  • Ship Name: Azamara Journey
  • Year Built: 2000
  • Year Refurbished: 2016
  • Year Entered Present Fleet: 2007
  • Ship Class: Journey
  • Maximum Capacity: 690
  • Number of Passenger Decks: 8
  • Number of Crew: 408
  • Officers' Nationality: International
  • Ocean-View without Balcony: 73
  • Ocean-View with Balcony: 200
  • Total Inside Staterooms: 26
  • Tonnage (GRT): 30,277
  • Capacity Based on Double Occupancy: 690
  • Country of Registry: Malta
  • Total Staterooms: 345
  • Suites with Balcony: 46
  • Crew/Hotel Staff Nationality: International
Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the hotel, resort or cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the provider without notice. Hotels, resorts, ships or accommodations designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Available Dates & Prices

Departure Date

Inside Stateroom

Ocean View Stateroom

Balcony Stateroom

Suite Stateroom

Terms & Conditions

*Price shown is per person based on double occupancy, is valid for select stateroom categories only, and does not include government taxes/fees and gratuities. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for details.

†The exact amount of the Costco Shop Card will be calculated during the booking process. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for additional information.

Ship's Registry: Malta

    Package ID: AZAJOUASI20220327