Europe and Mediterranean: Best of Greece Cruise

Celebrity Cruises

Immerse yourself in the incredible history, culture, cuisine, and undeniable beauty of the Old World on a Celebrity European cruise vacation. Whether you're traveling in the beautiful Mediterranean or visiting the iconic cities of Northern Europe, there are plenty of ways to embrace the best of everything in the region.

Included Extras

Executive Member Benefit

  • Executive Members receive an annual 2% Reward, up to $1,000, on qualified Costco Travel purchases

Digital Costco Shop Card

  • Member Exclusive: Digital Costco Shop Card with every Celebrity Cruises sailing†

Sailing Itinerary

Note: Cruise itineraries are subject to change. Please verify ports and times directly with the cruise line.

Day 1 Port of Call Athens/Piraeus Departure 5:00pm

Overview

Today Piraeus is the home base of Greek shipping, the largest commercial fleet in the world, apace bound to the sea like few others. The harbours of Zea and Mikrolimano as well as Phaliro play host to countless yachts and sailing craft throughout the year. Piraeus was known in medieval times as Porto Leone, a name due to the enormous stone lion, which guarded the port's entrance. Today, the life of Piraeus is centred on its three ports: the main, central one and those of Zea and Mikrolimano. You can walk around the central harbour, shared by cargo and passenger ships alike, and watch the constant comings and goings of goods and people from around the world. Having completed your tour of the central harbour of Piraeus you will then head south traversing the peninsula and arrive at Peiraiki, one of the most picturesque neighbour hoods in the city. Here one finds the harbour of Zea, one of the largest marinas in the Mediterranean. If the night finds you in the area, you can try one of the many bars found nearby. You can continue your tour along the waterfront heading towards Kastella but a small deviation toward the city centre will be useful for then you can visit the verdant square of the municipal Theatre with cafeterias and shops of all kinds surrounding it. The magnificent building housing the Municipal Theatre as well as the Town Hall and the Library complete the picture presented by the main square in the city. Piraeus's little natural harbours are among its busiest and most touristy areas: Mikrolimano, Passalimani, Zea, Freatida and Hatzikiriakio. Countless seaside tavernas provide delicious seafood washed down with the uniquely Greek drink, ouzo. The fresh smell of the sea and the sounds made by the assortment of caiques, yachts and sailing ships, which are moored next to the tables, complete the enjoyment of the food Beyond the port, the most impressive spots are the hills of Profitis Ilias and Kastela with their neoclassical mansions and modern buildings which look as they are hanging over the sea.

Day 2 Port of Call Thira/Santorini Arrival 8:00am Departure 9:00pm

Overview

Fira is a comparatively modern town, with houses built mostly during the 19th century when the old Venetian capital at Skaros became untenable due to earthquakes. The architecture is a jumble of Cycladic and Venetian, side by side, the similarities between the two being the stark whiteness. The impact of Aegean tourism has made itself felt in Fira, judging from the abundance of taverns, hotels, discotheques and shops. It is the largest town on the island and has gained preference with travelers because it is central and access to other parts of Santorini is made easy by either taxi or bus. From there you can indulge in some inspiring coastal walks. Wandering through the white cobbled streets of Fira, a town of about 2,000 inhabitants, one gets the feel of the old-world charm blended in with the modern day comforts. The town's archaeological museum is crammed with finds from excavations at Akrotiri. But besides being so interesting archaeologically, Santorini is essentially a beauty spot, an island whose cliffs seem to glow under an exceptionally clear light all day, but which at sunset glow redly, evoking that vast explosion more than 3000 years ago.

Day 3 Port of Call Mykonos Arrival 7:00am Departure 6:00pm

Overview

Mykonos is world-famous. It is no coincidence that this, the most cosmopolitan of all Greek islands, attracts so many visitors from all over the globe, including large numbers of artists and intellectuals. Here, the steep mountains to be encountered in most of the Cyclades give way to low, rocky hills which combine with superb beaches to make up the landscape of the island. The capital, Hora (Chora), with its colourful harbour in which little fishingboats nestle happily side by side with luxury yachts, presents quite a different picture from the majority of Aegean island towns. While it is usual for island villages to be built on naturally amphitheatrical sites, Mykonos is spread out over a flat area and conveys an impression of lid aesthetic cohesion. Along the whitewashed streets stand brilliant white box-shaped houses with stepped walls for sitting on, wooden doors and windows and brightly-coloured balconies. These are interspersed with small but impressive churches, pretty little tavernas and shops selling souvenirs and other goods, and the overall sense is of being inside a film set. On the low Kastro hill is the complex of churches known collectively as Our Lady 'Paraportiani', a superb arrangement of whitewashed masses created over the centuries and now recognised as a national cultural monument. Of particular historical and aesthetic interest are the medieval houses in this district of the town, which stand like a wall above the sea protecting the west side of Hora. The Archaeological Museum of Hora contains finds from tombs on the nearby island of Rhenia, sculptures, vases and figurines. The Folklore Museum brings together a number of collections of furniture, icons, pieces of sculpture and folk musical instruments. Mykonos is also the home of the Nautical Museum of the Aegean, which has interest all of its own. The countryside of Mykonos is a mixture of grey-green rocks ringed by prickly pear plants and little fertile areas carpeted with wild flowers. Here and there are tiny whitewashed chapels and windmills. Ano Mera is, after Hora, the most important of the older villages on the island. Standing 8 km. to the east of the town, Ano Mera has the interesting monastery of Our Lady Tourliani, ornamented with fine wood-carvings. The church has a collection of valuable ecclesiastical vessels, vestments and embroideries. The courtyard contains an interesting bell-tower and a marble fountain. Here lovers of the sea will find outstanding golden beaches such as Agios Stefanos, Psarou, Kalafatis, Platis Gialos, Ornos, Elia and Panormos. Miykonos is a busy island with all the amenities of a modern resort and with plenty to do - by day or night for those who want to have a lively time. Yet visitors fond of more peaceful holidays will still find quiet corners in which to relax.

Day 4 Port of Call Kusadasi Arrival 7:00am Departure 7:00pm

Overview

This seaside resort town has grown immensely in the last 30 years, and is especially popular with package holiday-makers from Europe. From a population of 6000 in the 1970s, it is now closer to 50,000, although a high proportion of this are part of the tourist industry and here only for the summer. Many cruising ships travelling around the Aegean Islands stop here, especially because of its close proximity (20km) to Selcuk. Kusadasi is a good base to explore this and other ancient cities like Priene and Didyma. Although there is little of historical interest in Kusadasi itself, the town is popular predominantly because of its many hotels, restaurants, souvenir and carpet shops, and lively nightlife. The Kale district has some old traditional houses and narrow streets, and gives some indication of what the town used to be like. The most famous beach is Kadinlar Plaji, 2.5km south of the town, dominated by huge hotels and can get very crowded in summer. There are several small beaches further south, and closer to town is Yilanci Burnu, the peninsular.

Day 5 Port of Call Thessaloniki Arrival 1:00pm

Overview

When a Greek tells you he's from Athens, he always sounds a bit apologetic, or regretful; Greeks from Thessaloniki, on the other hand, sound, if not smug, very pleased to be from Greece's "Second City." Thessaloniki may be second to Athens in political importance and population, but in popular songs, Thessaloniki is celebrated as "the mother of Macedonia," "the most blessed of cities," and "the city whose praises are sung." You, too, may be tempted to sing this city's praises when you take in its wonderful situation along the broad expanse of the Thermaic Gulf. You're never far from the sea here; when you least expect it, you'll catch a glimpse of waves and boats in the distance. Alas, especially in the summer, you'll almost certainly get less pleasant whiffs of the harbor's ripe, polluted odor. If you're very lucky, you'll see Mount Olympus while you're here: Pollution has increasingly obscured even that imposing landmark. Greeks are fond of reminding foreigners that when their ancestors were painting themselves blue, or living in rude huts, Greeks were sitting in the shade of the Parthenon, reading the plays of Sophocles. Similarly, Thessalonians like to remind Athenians that when Athens languished in the long twilight of its occupation by the Romans and Ottomans, Thessaloniki flourished. It's true: Thessaloniki's strategic location on the main land route from Europe into Asia made it a powerful city during the Roman Empire -- you'll see many monuments built here by the 4th-century A.D. emperor Galerius. During the Byzantine Empire (the 4th-15th centuries A.D.), Thessaloniki boasted that it was second only to the capital, Constantinople. That's when Thessaloniki's greatest pride, its superb and endearing churches, were built. After the Turks conquered the Byzantine Empire, Thessaloniki continued to flourish as an important commercial center and port. In the 18th and early 19th centuries, the city's Jewish community was so strong and so prosperous that some called Thessaloniki the "second Jerusalem." Then, in August 1917, a devastating fire destroyed 80% of the city. Phoenix-like, Thessaloniki rose from the ashes. Unfortunately, only part of the city was rebuilt according to the grand plan of the French architect Ernest Hébrard -- in part because of the 130,000 Greek refugees from Asia Minor who flooded into Thessaloniki between 1922 and 1923, almost doubling the city's population and leading to enormous unregulated development. Still, Thessaloniki has the broad tree-lined boulevards and parks that Athens so sadly lacks. After World War II, and again in the 1960s, two more growth spurts left much of the city's outskirts crowded and ugly -- and all too much of the city center lined with bland apartment buildings. You'll notice, however, that Thessaloniki has none of the horizon-blocking skyscrapers that have proliferated in Athens -- earthquake regulations forbid this. The last major earthquake was in 1978. Glimpses of the sea, tree-lined streets, magnificent Byzantine churches -- all these make visiting Thessaloniki delightful. And there's something else here that's quite wonderful: the food. In part, this is because of the long tradition of Macedonian cuisine; in part, because the refugees who came here from Turkey in 1922 brought with them the zesty cuisine of the Pontus (the area around the Black Sea where most of the refugees had lived). In addition, this is still a city whose establishments are supported by local customers. There are no restaurants here -- as yet -- that make their living off tourists. If you're a visitor to Thessaloniki, you'll appreciate all this. You'll also enjoy the fact that Thessaloniki's location in the virtual center of Macedonia makes it the perfect place from which to set off to the sites associated with Philip II of Macedon and his son Alexander the Great. If you are a man, you can also take in the monasteries of Mount Athos, the Holy Mountain. If you are a woman, you'll have that much more time to enjoy Thessaloniki -- or to sit patiently in the little port of Ouranopolis, the jumping-off point for Mount Athos, and envy those lucky enough to travel on to the Holy Mountain. High Season -- The busiest time of the year in Thessaloniki is not summer, but fall, when the International Trade Fair and Festival of Greek Songs take place in September, followed by the Demitria celebrations of the city's patron saints in October and November. There is also a Film Festival here in November. If you come between September and November, be sure to book a hotel in advance -- and be prepared to pay top money for your room (price hikes of 25% are common). Strategies for Seeing Thessaloniki -- Our suggestions on exploring Thessaloniki are really just that: suggestions. Unlike Athens, which few visitors would be bold enough to visit without seeing the Acropolis, Thessaloniki has no one "must-see" monument. Some might argue that the splendid Archaeological Museum or the Museum of Byzantine Culture fit the bill, but others would plead the case of the Upper City (Ano Poli), the old Turkish Quarter. Still others would recommend a loop through both the Upper City and the city center to take in as many Byzantine churches and Roman monuments as possible. In short, you're here to enjoy the city itself: a city filled with Byzantine churches and chapels, a city with squares built around Roman palaces, whose markets pulse with life, and whose harborside cafes and promenade refresh the weary.

Day 6 Port of Call Thessaloniki Departure 7:30pm

Overview

When a Greek tells you he's from Athens, he always sounds a bit apologetic, or regretful; Greeks from Thessaloniki, on the other hand, sound, if not smug, very pleased to be from Greece's "Second City." Thessaloniki may be second to Athens in political importance and population, but in popular songs, Thessaloniki is celebrated as "the mother of Macedonia," "the most blessed of cities," and "the city whose praises are sung." You, too, may be tempted to sing this city's praises when you take in its wonderful situation along the broad expanse of the Thermaic Gulf. You're never far from the sea here; when you least expect it, you'll catch a glimpse of waves and boats in the distance. Alas, especially in the summer, you'll almost certainly get less pleasant whiffs of the harbor's ripe, polluted odor. If you're very lucky, you'll see Mount Olympus while you're here: Pollution has increasingly obscured even that imposing landmark. Greeks are fond of reminding foreigners that when their ancestors were painting themselves blue, or living in rude huts, Greeks were sitting in the shade of the Parthenon, reading the plays of Sophocles. Similarly, Thessalonians like to remind Athenians that when Athens languished in the long twilight of its occupation by the Romans and Ottomans, Thessaloniki flourished. It's true: Thessaloniki's strategic location on the main land route from Europe into Asia made it a powerful city during the Roman Empire -- you'll see many monuments built here by the 4th-century A.D. emperor Galerius. During the Byzantine Empire (the 4th-15th centuries A.D.), Thessaloniki boasted that it was second only to the capital, Constantinople. That's when Thessaloniki's greatest pride, its superb and endearing churches, were built. After the Turks conquered the Byzantine Empire, Thessaloniki continued to flourish as an important commercial center and port. In the 18th and early 19th centuries, the city's Jewish community was so strong and so prosperous that some called Thessaloniki the "second Jerusalem." Then, in August 1917, a devastating fire destroyed 80% of the city. Phoenix-like, Thessaloniki rose from the ashes. Unfortunately, only part of the city was rebuilt according to the grand plan of the French architect Ernest Hébrard -- in part because of the 130,000 Greek refugees from Asia Minor who flooded into Thessaloniki between 1922 and 1923, almost doubling the city's population and leading to enormous unregulated development. Still, Thessaloniki has the broad tree-lined boulevards and parks that Athens so sadly lacks. After World War II, and again in the 1960s, two more growth spurts left much of the city's outskirts crowded and ugly -- and all too much of the city center lined with bland apartment buildings. You'll notice, however, that Thessaloniki has none of the horizon-blocking skyscrapers that have proliferated in Athens -- earthquake regulations forbid this. The last major earthquake was in 1978. Glimpses of the sea, tree-lined streets, magnificent Byzantine churches -- all these make visiting Thessaloniki delightful. And there's something else here that's quite wonderful: the food. In part, this is because of the long tradition of Macedonian cuisine; in part, because the refugees who came here from Turkey in 1922 brought with them the zesty cuisine of the Pontus (the area around the Black Sea where most of the refugees had lived). In addition, this is still a city whose establishments are supported by local customers. There are no restaurants here -- as yet -- that make their living off tourists. If you're a visitor to Thessaloniki, you'll appreciate all this. You'll also enjoy the fact that Thessaloniki's location in the virtual center of Macedonia makes it the perfect place from which to set off to the sites associated with Philip II of Macedon and his son Alexander the Great. If you are a man, you can also take in the monasteries of Mount Athos, the Holy Mountain. If you are a woman, you'll have that much more time to enjoy Thessaloniki -- or to sit patiently in the little port of Ouranopolis, the jumping-off point for Mount Athos, and envy those lucky enough to travel on to the Holy Mountain. High Season -- The busiest time of the year in Thessaloniki is not summer, but fall, when the International Trade Fair and Festival of Greek Songs take place in September, followed by the Demitria celebrations of the city's patron saints in October and November. There is also a Film Festival here in November. If you come between September and November, be sure to book a hotel in advance -- and be prepared to pay top money for your room (price hikes of 25% are common). Strategies for Seeing Thessaloniki -- Our suggestions on exploring Thessaloniki are really just that: suggestions. Unlike Athens, which few visitors would be bold enough to visit without seeing the Acropolis, Thessaloniki has no one "must-see" monument. Some might argue that the splendid Archaeological Museum or the Museum of Byzantine Culture fit the bill, but others would plead the case of the Upper City (Ano Poli), the old Turkish Quarter. Still others would recommend a loop through both the Upper City and the city center to take in as many Byzantine churches and Roman monuments as possible. In short, you're here to enjoy the city itself: a city filled with Byzantine churches and chapels, a city with squares built around Roman palaces, whose markets pulse with life, and whose harborside cafes and promenade refresh the weary.

Day 7 Cruising
Day 8 Port of Call Athens/Piraeus Arrival 5:00am

Overview

Today Piraeus is the home base of Greek shipping, the largest commercial fleet in the world, apace bound to the sea like few others. The harbours of Zea and Mikrolimano as well as Phaliro play host to countless yachts and sailing craft throughout the year. Piraeus was known in medieval times as Porto Leone, a name due to the enormous stone lion, which guarded the port's entrance. Today, the life of Piraeus is centred on its three ports: the main, central one and those of Zea and Mikrolimano. You can walk around the central harbour, shared by cargo and passenger ships alike, and watch the constant comings and goings of goods and people from around the world. Having completed your tour of the central harbour of Piraeus you will then head south traversing the peninsula and arrive at Peiraiki, one of the most picturesque neighbour hoods in the city. Here one finds the harbour of Zea, one of the largest marinas in the Mediterranean. If the night finds you in the area, you can try one of the many bars found nearby. You can continue your tour along the waterfront heading towards Kastella but a small deviation toward the city centre will be useful for then you can visit the verdant square of the municipal Theatre with cafeterias and shops of all kinds surrounding it. The magnificent building housing the Municipal Theatre as well as the Town Hall and the Library complete the picture presented by the main square in the city. Piraeus's little natural harbours are among its busiest and most touristy areas: Mikrolimano, Passalimani, Zea, Freatida and Hatzikiriakio. Countless seaside tavernas provide delicious seafood washed down with the uniquely Greek drink, ouzo. The fresh smell of the sea and the sounds made by the assortment of caiques, yachts and sailing ships, which are moored next to the tables, complete the enjoyment of the food Beyond the port, the most impressive spots are the hills of Profitis Ilias and Kastela with their neoclassical mansions and modern buildings which look as they are hanging over the sea.

Onboard the Celebrity Infinity

Costco Member Reviews

Celebrity Infinity® joined Celebrity Constellation® in pairing the brand's widely-recognized Millennium Class attributes with many of the most popular venues on the line's stylish, award-winning Solstice Class fleet, including the inventive, engaging "Qsine" specialty restaurant, the hip Celebrity iLounge, and AquaClass accommodations.

Onboard Activities

Activities & Services (included in cruise)

Solarium Pool

  • Card Room
  • Casino
  • Disco/Nightclub
  • Game Arcade
  • Movies
  • Theater/Show Lounge
  • Fitness Center
  • Sauna/Steam Room
  • Pool - Outdoor
  • Sports Facilities
  • Whirlpool/Jacuzzi
  • Music Library at Sea
  • Bars/Lounges
  • Library
  • Children's Outdoor Play Area
  • Organized Age Specific Activities
  • Teen Center or Disco
  • Teen Programs
  • Business Center
  • Concierge Desk
  • Duty-Free Shops/Boutiques
  • Elevators
  • Safe Deposit Boxes

Activities & Services (available for an extra fee)

Spa Reception

  • Beauty Salon
  • Full-Service Spa
  • Internet Center
  • Babysitting
  • Dry Cleaning/ Laundry Service
  • Infirmary/Medical Center

Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the cruise line without notice. Staterooms designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Dining

Blu Restaurant

Main Dining

Main Restaurant: The Main Restaurant offers an enriching range of culinary experiences, with an unparalleled wealth of artfully prepared dishes every evening. And, as part of Celebrity’s Top Chef at Sea experience, you’ll have the opportunity to indulge in some of the dishes that the judges raved about on Bravo’s Emmy® Award-winning TV show, Top Chef. Top Chef Night in the Main Restaurant features a full menu of delicious appetizers, soups, salads, entrees and desserts that were big hits on the show.

Blu: Available exclusively to AquaClass® guests, Blu specializes in the concept of “clean cuisine.” Popular dishes are prepared in imaginative and flavorful ways, without fussiness or pretense. Blu is open for breakfast and dinner.

Qsine Restaurant

Specialty Dining

Sushi on Five: Sushi on Five satisfies your craving for locally sourced, authentically prepared sushi and other Japanese specialties from a menu crafted by expert restaurateur and sushi chef, Yoshikazu "Yoshi" Okada. Treat yourself to the complex flavors of a hand-made sushi roll or nigiri featuring tuna albacore, shrimp, eel, and other fresh selections, or savor the simplicity of yellowtail, salmon, and octopus sashimi. Your culinary experience would be incomplete without dessert—be sure to try the caramelized gingerbread with wasabi gelato. This restaurant is available for an additional cost.

Café al Bacio and Gelateria: The warm atmosphere, comfortable furniture and the sweet scent of the Gelateria's freshly baked waffle cones create an instant emotional connection. Café al Bacio is a great place to relax, any time of day. Many guests like to stop by in the evening for one of the specialty dessert cocktails, and chat about a great meal that they had or a wonderful show they just enjoyed. There's always something to talk about at Café al Bacio. This restaurant is available for an additional cost.

Qsine®: Celebrity’s James Beard-featured Master Chef created Qsine to take you on a culinary journey unlike anything you’ve experienced before—on land or at sea. Leave any preconceived notions behind. Dig in and try new things. It's time your palate got a wakeup call. Qsine’s iPad® menus make your dining experience even more fun and interactive. This restaurant is available for an additional cost.

Tuscan Grill: An outgoing wait staff ensures tableside service that's personal as well as professional. And the food? Take the traditional style and artisanal flair of Italy, add contemporary influences, and serve the cuisine in abundance. It's all part of the expansive character of Tuscan Grille. This restaurant is available for an additional cost.

Luminae Restaurant

Casual Dining

AquaSpa® Café: Celebrity has created an extension of its leading spa experience by introducing the AquaSpa Café, one of the first venues of its kind in the cruise industry. The result is a creative take on healthy cuisine, featuring an eclectic blend of offerings that are both flavorful and nutritious. The AquaSpa Café is available to AquaClass® guests only.

Luminae: Offering complimentary breakfast, lunch, and dinner, Luminae is a culinary experience that spotlights modern, eclectic cuisine and globally inspired dishes. Luminae offers a deliciously unique dining experience exclusively for Suite Class guests.

Oceanview Café: Décor and offerings reflect that of an international marketplace. With a menu influenced by multiple cultures, the cuisine takes diners on a voyage around the world. Open for breakfast, lunch, dinner and late night.

Pool/Mast Grill: Let your cravings go wild. Grab a great burger in a relaxed, poolside environment.

Room Service: Perhaps a day of kayaking, shopping or golfing has you feeling pleasantly languid-or was it the afternoon spent relaxing with a novel that has you so serene? Either way, when you're in the mood to relax and dine in the comfort of your stateroom, Celebrity offers complimentary 24-hour in-stateroom dining.


Times, costs and other specifics are outside the control of Costco Travel. All information is at the sole discretion of the cruise line and is subject to change without notice. Dining time and table size preferences are submitted to the cruise line on a first-come, first-served request basis and are confirmed aboard ship. Questions, concerns and/or special needs regarding dining arrangements must be addressed with the maitre d' hotel aboard ship. Every effort is made to accommodate travelers' preferences; however, Costco Travel cannot guarantee dining arrangements. In specialty restaurants, space is limited and reservations are recommended. A cover charge and dress code may apply.

Staterooms

Elegant staterooms feature an ample sitting area with a sofa and a flat screen TV.

Inside (Category: I2)

Category: I2

Prime Inside (Category: I1)

Category: I1

Guarantee - Inside (Category: Z)

Category: Z
This category can be booked for a special rate, guaranteed to you. Please note that the category is not associated at the time of booking with a specific stateroom, deck, bedding configuration or other particular settings. The assignment of an actual cabin will be performed during your check-in. The cabin can be anywhere on the ship.

Enjoy a view of the sea with spacious staterooms that feature a sofa and a flat screen TV.

Ocean View (Category: O2)

Category: O2

Prime Ocean View (Category: O1)

Category: O1

Deluxe Ocean View (Category: DO)

Category: DO

Guarantee - Oceanview (Category: Y)

Category: Y
This category can be booked for a special rate, guaranteed to you. Please note that the category is not associated at the time of booking with a specific stateroom, deck, bedding configuration or other particular settings. The assignment of an actual cabin will be performed during your check-in. The cabin can be anywhere on the ship.

Staterooms feature a spacious balcony. Select categories include AquaClass® or Concierge Class.

Veranda (partial view) (Category: V3)

Category: V3

Veranda (Category: V2)

Category: V2

Prime Veranda (Category: V1)

Category: V1

Deluxe Veranda (Category: DV)

Category: DV

Sunset Veranda (Category: SV)

Category: SV

Ultra Deluxe Veranda (Category: UV)

Category: UV

Concierge Class (Category: C2)

Category: C2

Prime Concierge Class (Category: C1)

Category: C1

Ultra Deluxe Concierge Class (Category: UC)

Category: UC

AquaClass (Category: A2)

Category: A2

Prime AquaClass (Category: A1)

Category: A1

Guarantee - Concierge Class (Category: XC)

Category: XC
This category can be booked for a special rate, guaranteed to you. Please note that the category is not associated at the time of booking with a specific stateroom, deck, bedding configuration or other particular settings. The assignment of an actual cabin will be performed during your check-in. The cabin can be anywhere on the ship.

Guarantee - Aqua Class (Category: XA)

Category: XA
This category can be booked for a special rate, guaranteed to you. Please note that the category is not associated at the time of booking with a specific stateroom, deck, bedding configuration or other particular settings. The assignment of an actual cabin will be performed during your check-in. The cabin can be anywhere on the ship.

Guarantee - Balcony (Category: X)

Category: X
This category can be booked for a special rate, guaranteed to you. Please note that the category is not associated at the time of booking with a specific stateroom, deck, bedding configuration or other particular settings. The assignment of an actual cabin will be performed during your check-in. The cabin can be anywhere on the ship.

Suites feature European-style butler services, priority check-in and debarkation, seating preferences and much more.

Sky Suite (Category: S1)

Category: S1

AquaClass Sky Suite (Category: AS)

Category: AS

Celebrity Suite (Category: CS)

Category: CS

Royal Suite (Category: RS)

Category: RS

Penthouse Suite (Category: PS)

Category: PS

Guarantee - Suite (Category: W)

Category: W
This category can be booked for a special rate, guaranteed to you. Please note that the category is not associated at the time of booking with a specific stateroom, deck, bedding configuration or other particular settings. The assignment of an actual cabin will be performed during your check-in. The cabin can be anywhere on the ship.

Deck Plan

Cruise Ship
Sports Deck
Key to Symbols
SymbolDescription
Wheelchair-accessible stateroom featuring roll-in showerWheelchair-accessible stateroom featuring roll-in shower
Convertible sofa bedConvertible sofa bed
Two upper berthsTwo upper berths
One upper berthOne upper berth
Connecting stateroomsConnecting staterooms
Inside stateroom door locationInside stateroom door location
Double convertible sofa bedDouble convertible sofa bed

Ship Facts

Celebrity Infinity ship image
  • Ship Name: Celebrity Infinity
  • Year Built: 2001
  • Year Refurbished: 2012
  • Year Entered Present Fleet: 2001
  • Ship Class: Millennium
  • Maximum Capacity: 2,362
  • Number of Passenger Decks: 11
  • Number of Crew: 999
  • Officers' Nationality: Greek
  • Ocean-View without Balcony: 244
  • Ocean-View with Balcony: 573
  • Total Inside Staterooms: 218
  • Tonnage (GRT): 91,000
  • Capacity Based on Double Occupancy: 2,166
  • Country of Registry: Malta
  • Total Staterooms: 1,085
  • Suites with Balcony: 50
  • Crew/Hotel Staff Nationality: International
Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the hotel, resort or cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the provider without notice. Hotels, resorts, ships or accommodations designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Available Dates & Prices

Departure Date

Inside Stateroom

Ocean View Stateroom

Balcony Stateroom

Suite Stateroom

Departure Date - 07/20/2024

Inside Stateroom

N/A

Ocean View Stateroom

N/A

Balcony Stateroom

$1,349

Suite Stateroom

$2,414

Departure Date - 08/17/2024

Inside Stateroom

N/A

Ocean View Stateroom

N/A

Balcony Stateroom

N/A

Suite Stateroom

$2,914

Terms & Conditions

*Price shown is per person based on double occupancy and is valid for select stateroom categories only. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for details.

†One Digital Costco Shop Card per room/stateroom, per stay. The exact amount of the Digital Costco Shop Card will be calculated during the booking process. The Digital Costco Shop Card promotion is nontransferable and may not be combined with any other promotion. A Digital Costco Shop Card will arrive by email approximately 10 days after the start of your cruise. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for additional information.

Ship's registry: Malta

    Package ID: CELINFEUR20240525