World Cruise: Grand Arctic Adventure Voyage

Regent Seven Seas Cruises

Magnificent, impressive and awe-inspiring are excellent synonyms for grand, and you will need all of them to describe your Grand Voyage. Circumnavigate continents, cross the world's great oceans, explore a vast diversity of cultures and discover centuries of history, one leisurely day at a time.

All-Inclusive Cruise

  • All onboard gratuities

  • Select complimentary shore excursions**

  • Unlimited beverages, including fine wines and premium spirits served throughout the ship

  • In-suite refrigerator replenished daily with soft drinks, beer and bottled water

  • 24-Hour room service

  • No charge for specialty restaurants

  • Welcome bottle of Champagne

  • $100 Shipboard credit (per suite)††

Executive Member Benefit

  • Executive Members receive an annual 2% Reward, up to $1,000, on qualified Costco Travel purchases

  • Executive Members receive an additional $100 shipboard credit (per suite, not combinable with certain past-guest discounts)††

Costco Shop Card

  • Member Exclusive: Costco Shop Card with every Regent Seven Seas Cruises® sailing†

Sailing Itinerary

Note: Cruise itineraries are subject to change. Please verify ports and times directly with the cruise line.

Day 1Port of Call New York CityDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

New York City (officially the City of New York) is the largest city in the United States and one of the world's major global cities. Located in the state of New York, the city has a population of over 8.1 million within an area of 321 square miles (approximately 830 square km), making it the most densely populated major city in North America. Its metropolitan area has a population of 18.7 million and is one of the largest urban areas in the world. New York City is an international center for business, finance, fashion, medicine, entertainment, media, and culture, with an extraordinary collection of museums, galleries, performance venues, media outlets, international corporations, and financial markets. The city is also home to the headquarters of the United Nations, and to many of the world's most famous skyscrapers. Popularly known as the "Big Apple", the "City That Never Sleeps", or the "Capital of the World", the city attracts large numbers of immigrants, as well as people from all over the United States who come for its culture, diversity, fast-paced lifestyle, cosmopolitanism, and economic opportunity. The city is also currently distinguished for having the lowest crime rate among major American cities.

Day 2Port of Call Martha's Vineyard Arrival 8:00amDeparture 3:00pm

Overview

Martha's Vineyard, New England's largest resort Island, was formed by glacial action 10,000 years ago and lies 7 miles off the coast of Cape Cod, in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, USA. The Island is roughly triangular-shaped with its base the straight south shore. It is 9 miles wide and 23 miles long at its furthest points; the total land area is approximately 100 square miles. Martha's Vineyard has a total of 124.6 miles of tidal shoreline. There are six towns on the Island of Martha's Vineyard; three up-island towns, Aquinnah (formerly known as Gay Head), Chilmark, and West Tisbury; and three down-Island towns, Vineyard Haven (also known as Tisbury) Oak Bluffs and Edgartown. To get here you can come by sea or by air—there are no land routes, bridges or tunnels connecting us to the mainland. Most travelers arrive via one of the numerous ferries that service our harbors. A lesser but growing number use the Martha's Vineyard airport as their point of entry traveling via Cape Air or other commercial airlines or via private plane. The leisurely ferry ride or flight from the mainland will prepare you for a wonderful change of pace. The sound of the ocean, the magnificent beaches and almost endless stretches of field and forest will complete the transition. So come to the Vineyard, and see why so many people believe this is truly a magical place.

Day 3Port of Call Boston Arrival 10:00amDeparture 10:00pm

Overview

Genteel streets lined with elegant brick town houses, acres of public greens and gardens, more colleges than are found in many states, and a church on almost every corner: Boston serves up slices of history and culture at every turn. Savvy spin-doctors of centuries past have made the town that cradled independence our nation's history and myth capital. More than ever, America's mother city serves up the bold and new with the old and true -- reflecting skyscrapers mirror Colonial steeples, and expressways zip around buildings whose hand-etched look recalls the scrimshaw era. Few places in America display their history so lovingly. Like a multitiered wedding cake, the city of Boston consists of discrete layers. The deepest layer is the historical base, the place where musket-bearing revolutionaries vowed to hang together or hang separately. The next tier, a dense spread of Brahmin fortune and fortitude, might be labeled the Hub. The Hub saw only journalistic accuracy in the hometown slogan "the Athens of America" and felt only pride in the label "Banned in Boston." Over that lies Beantown, home to the Red Sox faithful and the raucous Bruins fans that crowd Boston Garden. This is the city whose ethnic loyalties -- Irish, Italian, Asian, and African-American -- account for its many distinct neighborhoods. Crowning these layers are the students who throng the city's universities and colleges every fall, infuriating not a few but pleasing the rest with their infusion of high spirits and dollars from home. The best part for a visitor is that Boston can be experienced within a day or two. This is a remarkably compact city, whose labyrinthine streets will delight the walker, although they can -- and often do -- push drivers over the edge. An hour's stroll will take you from sites in the North End -- where bewigged icons from dusty high school history books are transformed into flesh-and-blood heroes -- to Beacon Hill's mansions where the Lowells spoke only to the Cabots and the Cabots spoke only to God. You can explore the country's oldest public park, the Boston Common, in the morning, tour a Back Bay Victorian in the afternoon, and in the evening dine on Szechuan seafood in Chinatown or gnocchi in the North End. Even following the Freedom Trail -- a self-guiding walking tour of famous American historic sites -- traverses the layers: historical, Hub, and Beantown. Boston has been first too many times -- the first public library, the first public schools, and the first subway system -- to concede an inch of civic pride to bigger and bolder cities. It still sees itself as a pioneer in culture -- both popular and rarefied. In 1858, Oliver Wendell Holmes -- philosopher and author of The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table -- called Boston "the hub of the solar system"; social inflation, however, soon raised the ante to "hub of the universe." For Bostonians that still feels about right.

Day 4Port of Call Portland/Maine Arrival 8:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Portland stands as one of the few working waterfronts left in the United States, acting as New England’s largest tonnage seaport and second largest fishing port. It is also the second largest oil port on the East Coast and the largest foreign inbound transit tonnage port in the United States! Portland is Maine’s largest city with 66,000 full time residents; however it swells to 2 million if one includes annual visitors and part-time residents. Visitors come by car, train, airplane, and boat. Each year our port alone handles over 206,000 international passengers, including 41,000 cruise ship passengers and 165,000 passengers of the Scotia Prince. At every turn, Portland is an experience for everyone.

Day 5Port of Call Bar Harbor Arrival 8:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Bar Harbor has as many facets as a diamond, each offering a wealth of experience that is just waiting to be enjoyed and explored by visitors to our town. Few realize it, but the town of Bar Harbor encompasses everything from the Trenton Bridge to Otter Creek, from the town pier to Town Hill. Bar Harbor is comprised of 28,800 beautiful acres, is 28 miles long from west to east, and enjoys a coastline roughly as long. That's a lot of space for the 4500 residents, and a lot of exploring for the visitor.

Day 6Port of Call Saint John/New Brunswick Arrival 7:00amDeparture 3:00pm

Overview

Set along the coast of New Brunswick's Bay of Fundy, this oldest of Canada's cities has been welcoming people from Europe, England, and Ireland for centuries, each leaving their indelible imprint on Saint John's culture, architecture, and language. They are what make Saint John great, making you feel right at home with a jubilant love for their city! There are so many ways to enjoy this place that you just need to point yourself in any direction and go. Saint John is surrounded on three sides by beaches, and also has many lakes. Just about the whole year is festival season, so dust off your dancing shoes and tap your toes to the Acadian tunes that fill the air. With one hundred billion tons of seawater roaring in and out of the bay twice daily, you just know you're in for a seafood feast that's simply out of this world. Catch your own lobster, dig for clams for a clambake on the beach, and try some dulse, the world-famous purple seaweed dried to a crunchy snack! If buildings could talk, Saint John's would fill volumes. Over 200 years old, the streets are steeped in the history of this Maritime town and the best way to get a sense of this past is to tour uptown on foot. Then, without even leaving the city, you can segue from architecture to nature by visiting Rockwood Park and enjoying the wildlife at Irving Nature Park by the sea. The views will have you snapping your camera every minute!

Day 7Port of Call Halifax Arrival 10:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Halifax, an Atlantic Ocean port in eastern Canada, is the provincial capital of Nova Scotia. A major business centre, it’s also known for its maritime history. The city’s dominated by the hilltop Citadel, a star-shaped fort completed in the 1850s. Waterfront warehouses known as the Historic Properties recall Halifax’s days as a trading hub for privateers, notably during the War of 1812.

Day 8Port of Call Sydney/Nova Scotia Arrival 10:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Sydney is a harbour town on Cape Breton Island, in Nova Scotia, Canada. By the water, the Big Fiddle is a huge violin statue honouring local music. Wooden 18th-century buildings include the Cossit and Jost houses, now museums with period furniture. St. Patrick’s Church Museum showcases local history in an 1828 church. East, at Glace Bay, the Cape Breton Miners’ Museum explores the area’s coal-mining heritage.

Day 9Port of Call Corner Brook Arrival 10:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

The City is nestled among the folded and faulted Long Range Mountains, which are a continuation of the Appalachian Mountain belt, stretching up from Georgia in the southern United States. Set at the mouth of the Bay of Islands, the City is 40 km (25 miles) inland from the open waters of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The landscape of the Corner Brook region is rugged and the scenery is spectacular. The surrounding coastline holds magnificent fjords, jagged headlands, thickly forested areas and many offshore islands. Wildlife, forest and water mingle with the City's borders on all sides and mountains fill the horizon in all directions. The history of the Corner Brook region is long and diverse. For thousands of years, people have lived and worked along the shores of the Bay of Islands and in the Humber River Valley, including two aboriginal groups - the Maritime Archaic Indians and the Beothuk people. Theatre and art are alive in Corner Brook. Theatre Newfoundland and Labrador (TNL), one of the province's only professional theatre companies, maintains its home office in Corner Brook. The Arts and Culture Center sets the stage for visiting productions - ballet companies, comedians, theatrical productions and musical artists all make Corner Brook a stop on their Canadian tours. The visual arts are also thriving in Corner Brook. Painters, photographers and sculptors find inspiration in the landscape and culture of Corner Brook and a number of art galleries display and sell their work. Those interested in visual art can study at Memorial University of Newfoundland's Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, which has offered a Bachelor of Fine Arts program since 1988.

Day 10 Cruising
Day 11 Cruising
Day 12Port of Call Nuuk Arrival 9:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Nuuk was founded by the unfailingly optimistic Hans Egede - the Danish missionary with soul-conversions on his agenda - who promptly named the settlement Good Hope. The naming turned out to be more of a Hail Mary than a prophesy: first the native Inuit moved out of a neighborhood that, to their way of thinking, had become too congested, and later smallpox and tuberculosis epidemics ripped through the small settlement. Even today Nuuk is small by modern standards, with a total population of only 14,000. Despite a wealth of land and a paucity of people, Nuuk has insisted on housing the population in immense apartment blocks with imaginative names like Blok P - a kind of Gulag on ice - and the urban sprawl is now spreading out along the road to the airport. Kolonihavnen is a pleasant exception to the rest of Nuuk's Lego-city look: it's a picturesque 18th-century fishing village in the heart of Nuuk and gives some idea of what the town looked like before the industrial harbor was built. Nuuk's real attraction lies in its proximity to any number of excellent day hikes into the hinterland and the fabulous views from the tops of the nearby mountains. Organized tours, boat trips and the rental of equipment is also easier from the capital.

Day 13Port of Call Paamiut Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

The town of Paamiut is located at the mouth of the Kuannersooq Fjord and the town's name also means 'inhabitants at the mouth'. The town was built in 1742, and the very characteristic wooden church dates from 1909. The interesting local museum located at the town center is fitted up in 19th -century buildings that include a former carpentry workshop and a salt house. To all appearances, the area has been inhabited since around 1,500 BC. Like the other towns of West Greenland, the sea does not freeze over during winter and the primary occupation for the 2,100 inhabitants in Paamiut and its only settlement of Arsuk is fishing. In spring and summer however, the fishing and other maritime traffic can be obstructed by field ice floating along the east coast of Greenland and continuing up the west coast - but even so the field ice is a fascinating sight. The sea's great importance to the town is also emphasized by the fact that Greenland's maritime-trade training programs are housed here. Perhaps Paamiut ought to have been called 'the land of the white-tailed eagle', because the area has the largest population of white-tailed eagles in Greenland. If visitors choose to sail out on the open sea instead, they are almost certain to see whales in late summer and autumn. The whales will usually be rorquals, fin whales, killer whales or humpbacks.

Day 14Port of Call Qaqortoq Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Qaqortoq, sitting at the tip of the peninsula in the south of Greenland, is a clean pleasant harbor town built on the site of Hans Egede's search for the lost colonists. Although only boasting 3500 people, it's considered to be the hub of the south and is worth visiting in summer when the place explodes with wildflowers. The town's pride of possession is the town square fountain - the only one in Greenland - with the names of the town burghers, past and present, in brass letters on the base (although many names have fallen victim to souvenir hunters). Qaqortoq museum is worth a gander - it's one of Greenland's finest - and exhibits artifacts from past and present cultures. Mostly, though, Qaqortoq is used as a base for hiking treks: either one day hikes up 'Peter's Cairn’ or around the edge of the Tasersuaq Lake, or as a departure point for the three- to four-day treks to the neighboring town of Igaliku. The Hvalsey ruins, sitting on a coastal strip just out of Qaqortoq, are the most extensive and best preserved Norse ruins in Greenland. There is a choice of ferry services on most days of the week, and several daily flights to other settlements along the west coast. It's also possible to trek from some of the neighboring towns. Qaqortoq is 450km (279mi) down the coast from Nuuk, although the distance by foot would be much greater given the heavily fringed coastline.

Day 15 Cruising
Day 16 Cruising
Day 17Port of Call Isafjordur Arrival 9:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Isafjorour is a town in the Westfjords region of northwest Iceland. It's known for its dramatic landscapes. The old town has wooden houses with corrugated tin roofs built by fishing merchants in the 18th and 19th centuries. The Westfjords Heritage Museum has exhibits on the town’s maritime history, including a collection of old fishing boats. The old hospital, now a cultural center, contains archives and photography.

Day 18Port of Call Reykjavik Arrival 8:00am

Overview

Reykjavik, on the coast of Iceland, is the country's capital and largest city. It's home to the National and Saga museums, tracing Iceland’s Viking history. The striking concrete Hallgrimskirkja church and rotating Perlan glass dome offer sweeping views of the sea and nearby hills. Exemplifying the island’s volcanic activity is the geothermal Blue Lagoon spa, near the village of Grindavik.

Day 19Port of Call ReykjavikDeparture 9:00pm

Overview

Reykjavik, on the coast of Iceland, is the country's capital and largest city. It's home to the National and Saga museums, tracing Iceland’s Viking history. The striking concrete Hallgrimskirkja church and rotating Perlan glass dome offer sweeping views of the sea and nearby hills. Exemplifying the island’s volcanic activity is the geothermal Blue Lagoon spa, near the village of Grindavik.

Day 20Port of Call Heimaey Island Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Heimaey, literally Home Island, is an Icelandic island. At 13.4 square kilometres, it is the largest island in the Vestmannaeyjar archipelago, and the largest and most populated island off the Icelandic coast.

Day 21Port of Call Eskifjordur Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Eskifjorour, or also Eskifjordur, is a town and port in eastern Iceland with a large fishing industry. It has a population of 1,043 and constitutes one of the most populated small town part of the municipality of Fjaroabyggo.

Day 22Port of Call Torshavn Arrival 1:00pm

Overview

Tórshavn owes its name to one of the old Nordic Gods, Thor (Tórshavn = Thor’s Harbour). The town was founded about 825 a.d. when the first Norwegian settlers (the Landnámsmenn) colonised the islands. Today we know, however, that Irish monks have stayed in The Faroe Islands a hundred years earlier (727 a.d.). Tórshavn has about 17.000 inhabitants. It may be the smallest capital in the world, but is certainly a town of today. Tórshavn has many points of interest for tourists, such as museums, buildings (churches etc.), monuments, parks and other sites. The thriving harbour includes also the small promontory Tinganes, the site of the oldest -still active- parliament in the world: Løgtingið.

Day 23Port of Call TorshavnDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Tórshavn owes its name to one of the old Nordic Gods, Thor (Tórshavn = Thor’s Harbour). The town was founded about 825 a.d. when the first Norwegian settlers (the Landnámsmenn) colonised the islands. Today we know, however, that Irish monks have stayed in The Faroe Islands a hundred years earlier (727 a.d.). Tórshavn has about 17.000 inhabitants. It may be the smallest capital in the world, but is certainly a town of today. Tórshavn has many points of interest for tourists, such as museums, buildings (churches etc.), monuments, parks and other sites. The thriving harbour includes also the small promontory Tinganes, the site of the oldest -still active- parliament in the world: Løgtingið.

Day 24Port of Call Kirkwall Arrival 9:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

As the main town in Orkney, Kirkwall (ON Kirkjuvagr - Church Bay) makes a good starting point for a visit to the islands. It is first mentioned in the sagas as the dwelling place of Earl Rognvald Brusison about 1035, who built a church dedicated to King Olav of Norway there. The town developed around the Cathedral, and became the administrative and commercial centre, with its access to the North Isles, central position and sheltered harbour in the then much bigger Peedie Sea. Today the winding main Street still follows the shape of the original settlement, and many of the fine old houses with end-on gables date from the 16th to 18th centuries. Narrow lanes run off the Street which has many attractive shops. At Broad Street it opens into the expanse of the grass-covered Kirk Green in front of St Magnus Cathedral. The attractive harbour front is the scene of much activity with ferries and fishing boats. Over the last 200 years the pier has greatly expanded, but the Harbour Basin still retains much of its charm. The Orkney Museum is housed in Tankerness House, parts of which date from the 15th century. This museum is a good starting point from which to gain an insight into Orkney’s rich past. The Tankerness Gardens behind the museum make a pleasant place for a seat on a nice day. St Magnus Cathedral is across the road, and makes an excellent finale to a visit, with its peaceful interior. The nearby Bishop’s and Earl’s Palaces date from Norse and Scottish times. Wideford Hill, just to the west of Kirkwall is situated on the Old Finstown Road. It can be reached by footpath and by road. From the summit most of the North and South Isles, East and West Mainland and Scapa Flow can be seen. Kirkwall is an excellent place to seek out interesting souvenirs or presents, with its wide variety of quality shops stocking knitwear, Orkney jewellery and crafts, local books, as well as many other home-produced items. In addition there is a good selection of Orkney food and drink products such as Highland Park Whisky, Orkney Herring, Orkney Cheese, smoked fish of various kinds and of course the famous Orkney Beef. The Highland Park Visitor Centre on the edge of the town offers visits to the distillery and an excellent audiovisual introduction to Orkney and the making of Highland Park, as well as an enchanting shop which stocks many interesting items.

Day 25Port of Call Stornoway Arrival 8:00amDeparture 4:00pm

Overview

Stornoway is the main town on the Isle of Lewis and is also the home of the Western Isles Council. Just over 6,000 people live in the town, which represents about a third of the Islands total population. The economy is a mix of traditional businesses like fishing, Harris Tweed and farming, with more recent influences like Tourism, the oil industry and commerce brought about by the digital revolution and communications. Stornoway is the main port on the Island, due to its sheltered location with the ferry to Ulapool a regular visitor. The sheltered harbour is the reason for Stornoway's existence and was named by the visiting Vikings "Steering Bay" which, when phonetically translated, became the name Stornoway. The town has a wide range of facilities ranging from a large secondary school, (Nicholson Institute) and technical college, to sporting facilities, which includes a brand new sports complex. The town also has a Golf Course, Astro Turf pitch, Go-Carting and even a paintball action area. Cruises around the area by boat are available during the summer months, embarking from the pontoons behind the Lifeboat Station. Cultural facilities are well catered for with a good museum, art gallery and library. In the grounds of Lews Castle the Stornoway Trust has developed a series of well maintained woodland walks of varying lengths and scenic features.A ccommodation and Hotels are plentiful and a list of the different providers can be found on the Accommodation links. Places to eat out are also plentiful and range from restaurants and cafes to takeaways and hotels.

Day 26Port of Call Killybegs Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Killybegs is one of Ireland's most important fishing ports but it has also much to offer as a tourist centre. It is situated on a fine natural harbour and is gaining a reputation as a water sports centre. There is sea and river fishing, sub-aqua diving, tennis and dancing. The Killybegs International Sea Angling Festival is held in August. Every 2 years the Harvest rally is held here with all the best rally drivers in Donegal. Killybegs is also home to the world's largest fishing vessle the "Atlantic Dawn". There is plenty of Views in and around Killybegs including Sleive League just 30 minutes drive away.

Day 27Port of Call Douglas Arrival 10:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Douglas is situated on the east coast of the Isle of Man. Douglas has been the island's capital since 1863 and holds most of the island action. Its beautiful sea front is lined with picturesque hotels and restaurants. The shopping high street is filled with familiar names like Boots, Marks & Spencer, Next, etc, as well as many locally owned stores. Parking is available on the sea front or in various car parks around the town. There are two sides to the hotel market. The south side is close to town, steam railway, buses and sea terminal. The north side leaves behind the noise of town and is closer to the Manx Electric Railway. From spring to early autumn the Horse Drawn Trams run along the front. This can make a big difference for those without cars, who wish to get along the 2 mile long promenade. Buses and Taxis are also available.

Day 28 Dun Laoghaire Arrival 8:00amDeparture 7:00pm
Day 29Port of Call Liverpool Arrival 8:00amDeparture 9:00pm

Overview

Liverpool is fast becoming one of Europe’s most popular city break destinations. After being awarded European Capital of Culture 2008, the city has moved into the sights of travellers and tourists from around the world. Already famous as the birthplace of The Beatles, the city’s other cultural assets are justifiably touted as some of the finest in Europe. With more theatres, museums and galleries than any other UK city outside London, Liverpool’s history as one of the world’s great ports has left a remarkable legacy of art and architecture that gives it a distinctive look and unique atmosphere. Liverpool is also one of the world’s great sporting cities with horse racing at Aintree and Haydock, 40 golf courses – seven of which are Championship standard, including the Royals Birkdale and Lytham, not to mention Liverpool and Everton FC. So if it’s Strawberry Fields, Premiership football or Europe’s finest culture you’re looking for, it has to be Liverpool.

Day 30Port of Call Holyhead Arrival 8:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Holyhead is the largest town on the island of Anglesey and is perhaps known best for being a busy ferry port. However, visitors should also note that the town has a number of interesting attractions and is a bustling shopping and visitors area in its own right. The town centre offers a number of good places to eat, a theatre and a cinema. There are a range of places for the visitor to stay and Holyhead is often used as an overnight stop on the way to, or from, holidaying in Ireland or as a centre for touring the island of Anglesey itself. Around Holyhead there is excellent fishing, golfing and,of course, sailing facilities. Couple this with the wonderful scenery, walks and beaches and visitors can easily relax for a few days. From Anglesey, ferries operate to Dublin with the superfast ferry only taking 99 minutes to complete the single journey. A day trip to sample the wonderful Dublin is easily achievable and is far cheaper that you think. History buffs will be well pleased to know Anglesey has a number of both historic and prehistoric sites close-by, including burial chambers at Barcloddiad Yr Gawres and a church in the sea at Porth Cwyfan! Llys Rhosyr, the site of one of the most powerful and charismatic Welsh mediaeval princes has been discovered near the village of Newborough, on the South Western corner of the island. The maritime museum in Holyhead is well worth a visit where tourists can learn more about the 100 shipwrecks that have taken place in the vicinity .

Day 31Port of Call Waterford/Ireland Arrival 7:00amDeparture 4:00pm

Overview

Waterford is the oldest city in Ireland. A walled city of Viking origins, it retains much of it's medieval character together with the graceful buildings from its 18th century expansion. The parameters of the 10th century settlement can be clearly identified in The Viking Triangle. Reginald's Tower is the most historic urban medieval monument in Ireland. The elegant Chamber of Commerce building, the City Hall and the Bishop's Palace are prime examples of beautiful 18th century architecture. Waterford is the home of Waterford Crystal, the world-famous hand-crafted, cut glass product and is a sophisticated shopping venue for high fashion and craft & design centres. Ecclesiastical landmarks include St. Patrick's Churches, Black Friars, St. Olave's Church and Greyfriars. The Church Of Ireland Christ Church Cathedral, and the Catholic Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity were both designed by Waterford architect John Roberts (1714 - 1796). Waterford Treasures at the Granary is both a treasury of gold, bronze, silver, crystal and historical documents and a treasure trail that takes you through 1000 years of Ireland's oldest city. Waterford has a long theatrical and musical tradition, which centres on the historic Theatre Royal, which hosts the Waterford International Festival of Light Opera each year. In the Garter Lane Arts Centre, which is home to the local Red Kettle Theatre Company, other visiting groups and arts exhibitions. The "Large Room" in City Hall is the venue for the popular Waterford Show. The Forum Theatre is another theatrical venue in the city.

Day 32Port of Call Weymouth Arrival 11:00amDeparture 9:00pm

Overview

Weymouth has so much to offer the visitor from it's heritage heartland where historical buildings, a restored Victorian Fort, pubs, restaurants, visitor attractions and museums merge with the new town centre shopping complex, 10 pin bowling and 9 screen multiplex cinema. Face a bustling flotilla of fishing boats, pleasure craft, yachts, catamarans and the high speed fast Condor Ferries making their day trips to the Channel Islands and St Malo in France which gives that little extra in making a memorable holiday experience. An ever changing view and atmosphere of the bay, harbour and new marina awaits. Weymouth's crowning glory is its award-winning beach. It's safe, it's soft and it's sandy. The impressive sweep of the Georgian seafront houses a wide variety of hotels, restaurants and pubs, cafes and shops, small character shops and the new town shopping centre.

Day 33Port of Call Saint Malo Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Saint-Malo is a port city in Brittany, in France's northwest. Tall granite walls surround the old town, which was once a stronghold for privateers (pirates approved by the king). The Saint-Malo Cathedral, in the center of the old town, is built in Romanesque and Gothic styles and features stained-glass windows depicting city history. Nearby is La Demeure de Corsaire, an 18th-century privateer’s house and museum.

Day 34Port of Call Southampton Arrival 6:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Southampton is a port city on England’s south coast. It’s home to the SeaCity Museum, with an interactive model of the Titanic, which departed from Southampton in 1912. Nearby, Southampton City Art Gallery specialises in modern British art. Solent Sky Museum features vintage aircraft like the iconic Spitfire. Tudor House & Garden displays artifacts covering over 800 years of history, including a penny-farthing bike.

Day 35Port of Call Honfleur Arrival 6:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Visiting Honfleur means, travelling through history in the heart of an exceptionally preserved site. Our old maritime city is very wellknown for its old dock but we are inviting you to experiment its particular atmosphere walking through its old narrow paved streets. Honfleur is certainly proud of its prestigious past but the city is also definitely turned toward future. It is a dynamic harbour offering an increasingly number of cultural activities: exhibitions, concerts and traditional feast such as the Shrimp feast or the Russian Film Festival. Take the time to discover Honfleur.

Day 36Port of Call Antwerp Arrival 2:00pm

Overview

Antwerp is the largest city in Flanders, the northern part of Belgium. Some 60% of the ten million Belgians are Flemings. They speak Dutch. Like their French and German-speaking compatriots they have their own parliament and government. The capital of Flanders is Brussels, also capital of federal Belgium and the heart of Europe. The city's 468 717 inhabitants (as recorded on 02/2004) live in a territory, which covers approximately 22,076 hectares. The city is located between latitude 51°13'16' and 4°23'60' eastern longitude. It has a moderate maritime climate.

Day 37Port of Call AntwerpDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Antwerp is the largest city in Flanders, the northern part of Belgium. Some 60% of the ten million Belgians are Flemings. They speak Dutch. Like their French and German-speaking compatriots they have their own parliament and government. The capital of Flanders is Brussels, also capital of federal Belgium and the heart of Europe. The city's 468 717 inhabitants (as recorded on 02/2004) live in a territory, which covers approximately 22,076 hectares. The city is located between latitude 51°13'16' and 4°23'60' eastern longitude. It has a moderate maritime climate.

Day 38Port of Call Rotterdam Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Nowadays Rotterdam is a vital part of the economy of the Netherlands. The Port of Rotterdam, the largest port in the world with a total throughput of about 300 million metric tons a year provides a solid base for industry in and around the Rotterdam area. Its population is about 575000, which makes it one of the largest cities in the Netherlands, but the number of people that work in the Rotterdam area or are otherwise economically dependent of it exceeds that number by far. The density of population is among the highest in the Netherlands, exceeding 4000 per square kilometer. Shipping, storage and forwarding are of course among the most important activities in the region, but the port of Rotterdam has also created a large chemical industry, which is fully dependent upon the transport facilities for the inflow of crude oil and the shipping of the various refined end products. Large petrochemical plants have sprung up, especially on the south bank of the Maas. These plants are in operation 24 hours a day. The development of Europoort ('Euro gate') started in 1957. A large complex of ports and industrial areas was created between Rotterdam and the entry to the North Sea. When more space was needed, the Maasvlakte ('Maas Flats') was created. By means of dikes, dams and sand deposits the coast line was altered to include many square kilometers of newly created land, where the Petroleum Harbors, container terminals, ore terminals and the Maasvlakte power plant are located. An interesting feature is the 'disaster area', a training complex where fire brigades train to cope with large-scale industrial accidents. The complex includes a grounded tanker that is set on fire several times a day. The name Europoort suggests that Rotterdam wanted to become the gateway to Europe. By 1963 this suggestion had become outdated, because in that year Rotterdam could claim to be the largest port in the world, a record that it still holds. In fact, the Berge Stahl, a 365000 ton ore carrier, is fully dependent on the port of Rotterdam, since this is the only port on the European continent that this ship (with its 23m/75ft draught) can access. After the flood in 1953 a large project was initiated to prevent such floodings in the future. This project, the 'Delta plan', involved stronger and higher dikes and numerous flood barriers. The latest of those flood barriers to be completed was the storm surge barrier in the Nieuwe Waterweg near Hoek van Holland. Two enormous doors mounted on swing arms can be used to close off the Nieuwe Waterweg, should storm and high water require so in order to protect the country from flooding. Normally the doors are open, so as not to impede the flow of ships through the Nieuwe Waterweg. Building and development have become a way of life for Rotterdam. The city has continued to grow, and it shows no signs of slowing down. And although this constant increase of population, urbanization and development all breed their own problems, Rotterdam is ready for the next millennium. As the economic heart of the Netherlands, with a population heading towards 600000, it had better be ready.

Day 39 Cruising
Day 40Port of Call Aarhus Arrival 10:00amDeparture 11:00pm

Overview

Situated in the middle of the Jutland peninsula, Aarhus is the second biggest city in Denmark. Founded over 1,000 years ago as a Viking settlement at the mouth of the river, the town first began developing in approximately 1900, when industrial growth attracted rural populations. The population of Aarhus has almost doubled since 1935 and is still growing, although rather more slowly than in recent decades. Today, 'The Smallest Big City in Denmark' is full of excitement and adventure brimming over with music and dancing, theatre and opera, a wealth of museums, and much more. Visitors come to luxuriate in the magnificent and sublime performances of the internationally renowned Wagner operas or visit the more "alternative" entertainment venues rich in atmosphere and excitement. As the capital of the provinces, it has all the atmosphere of a big city. In addition to the smart, seductive cultural events that take place all the year round, refreshing green woods and sunlit beaches are within easy reach, providing welcome respite from the thronging crowds and the mighty roar of traffic. Thanks to the relatively large population of younger inhabitants Aarhus has the feel of a "young" town. This follows naturally as Aarhus boasts many schools and educational institutions that attract young people from out-lying districts. However, many of them move away once their studies are completed. A notable centre of commerce, the Port of Aarhus is one of Denmark's largest harbours with a cargo-handling capacity of 11 million tonnes and 600,000 containers. With planned investment of an additional two billion Danish kroner over the next 25 years, future development plans include a doubling of the harbour's capacity.

Day 41Port of Call Helsingborg Arrival 8:00amDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

Helsingborg's vision is to become both the most attractive town in Sweden and to provide a comprehensive and good service throughout the life of each inhabitant. High quality in harmony with nature is the key concept. To reach this goal, Helsingborg strives to provide a good platform for trade and industry while strengthening its environmental profile and its identity as an attractive cultural and tourist town. Helsingborg has a population of close to 118,000 inhabitants and is thereby Sweden's 9th biggest community. About 85,000 people reside in the town itself. For many years Helsingborg was just a small town, but thanks to the railways and a new harbour a strong expansion took place around the middle of the 19th century. Helsingborg is situated at the narrowest part of the strait between Sweden and Denmark and the distance across the water to Helsingör in Denmark is not more than 4km. Helsingborg is a trading centre, the harbour is the second largest in the country and the European highways E4 and E6 cross one another just outside the town.

Day 42Port of Call Warnemunde Arrival 6:00am

Overview

Warnemunde is Rostock's most beautiful seaside resort. With its unspoilt coastline with its broad, white sandy beach, Warnemünde is also one of the most important German ferry and cruise ship ports on the Baltic coast.

Day 43Port of Call WarnemundeDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Warnemunde is Rostock's most beautiful seaside resort. With its unspoilt coastline with its broad, white sandy beach, Warnemünde is also one of the most important German ferry and cruise ship ports on the Baltic coast.

Day 44Port of Call Gdynia Arrival 1:00pmDeparture 10:00pm

Overview

Gdynia is a young, but quickly expanding harbor city situated just at the seashore, offering many tourist attractions as well as splendid shopping opportunities and a lot of entertainment. The city was founded as a Polish harbor in 1926. Because of its unusual location, visitors will easily catch great views of the sea and beautiful scenery, and also find long stroll sidewalks, beautiful waterfronts, marinas and yacht clubs. Gdynia is the only city in Poland and one of the few in Europe to pride on such a long and accessible seashore.

Day 45Port of Call Klaipeda Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Klaipeda is a port city in Lithuania, where the Baltic Sea meets the Dane River. The old town features German-style, 18th-century wood-framed buildings. Theater Square, the city’s main gathering spot, is home to the neoclassical Drama Theater. The square’s 1912 Taravos Anike sculpture pays tribute to a local poet. The waterside Lithuanian Sea Museum includes dolphin shows and maritime exhibits in a 19th-century fort.

Day 46Port of Call Visby Arrival 9:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

The walled and cobbled medieval port of Visby is a living relic: more than 40 proud towers and the ruins of great churches attest to Visby's former Hanseatic glories. The contemporary ruins of Drotten, St Nicolai, St Lars and St Carin are all within the town walls and contrast with the old but sound cathedral of St Maria. Gotlands Fornsal is the historical museum with a fine collection of the Gotland picture stones of the pre-Viking period. During the second week of August, costumes and re-enactments commemorate medieval week. Visby is on the island of Gotland, which is serviced by flights from Stockholm and ferries from a number of mainland cities.

Day 47Port of Call Stockholm Arrival 10:00am

Overview

'Beauty on Water' or 'Venice of the North' - these phrases sum up the Baltic allure of a city built on 14 islands in an archipelago of some 24,000. Founded by Birger Jarl in 1252, Stockholm owes its existence to water, developing as a transit point for goods moving between the Baltic Sea and Lake Mälaren. A strategic and trade centre, the fortified town grew during the Middle Ages when it acquired much of its picturesque architecture. However, it only became the national capital in 1634, during the Thirty Years War, when Sweden was an imperial power. The Vasa monarchs left Stockholm with a Baroque magnificence that would grace a far grander setting than today's peaceful capital of a small Nordic nation: splendid palaces, gold and ironwork, dignified ceremonial and rich royal collections. Baroque monumental stucco blends beautifully with the colourful plastered walls of the medieval Old Town. The clear northern light falling across these surfaces, especially during the endless northern summer evenings, intensifies the freshness and cleanliness of even the most venerable districts. Modern Stockholm is a bustling business hub for the entire Baltic region yet anglers can still catch salmon in the centre of the city. Sweden was the envy of less dynamic economies during the 1960s and 1970s, with Stockholm a trading and commercial centre to be reckoned with, as anyone who has ever used an Ericsson mobile phone or an Ikea chair can testify. Swedish design genius, aesthetic and technical know-how, has ensured that many professionals in the creative and IT fields look to Stockholm for inspiration and partnership. Prosperous, efficient and well-scrubbed, Stockholm balances its economic vigour with a remarkably unspoilt natural charm. With 30% of the city area made up of waterways and another 30% parks and green spaces, it has perhaps the freshest air and widest lungs of any European capital. But it has nightlife and a restaurant culture that belie any impression of a quiet garden city; Stockholm has almost as many restaurants per capita as Paris and a night in the hotspots of Stureplan should be enough to satisfy even the most demanding clubber. Sweden is the world's third most successful exporter of pop music behind the United States and Britain, a process that began with Abba's global success in the 1970s. A good night out here can soon blow away any clichés about Nordic gloom. And Stockholm's 150 or so museums and galleries means there's plenty to do on rainy days. Light on water and pure air may be the strongest impression a visitor carries away from Stockholm, especially in the summer, but they might equally be thinking of a particularly rowdy night in the Pelikan Bar on Södermalm, or hot jazz in the Lydmar Hotel. The entire world may descend on Stockholm each December for the Nobel Prize ceremonies, but they arrive in the winter cold and darkness; the smiles of a summer night are far more inviting for the traveller.

Day 48Port of Call StockholmDeparture 4:00pm

Overview

'Beauty on Water' or 'Venice of the North' - these phrases sum up the Baltic allure of a city built on 14 islands in an archipelago of some 24,000. Founded by Birger Jarl in 1252, Stockholm owes its existence to water, developing as a transit point for goods moving between the Baltic Sea and Lake Mälaren. A strategic and trade centre, the fortified town grew during the Middle Ages when it acquired much of its picturesque architecture. However, it only became the national capital in 1634, during the Thirty Years War, when Sweden was an imperial power. The Vasa monarchs left Stockholm with a Baroque magnificence that would grace a far grander setting than today's peaceful capital of a small Nordic nation: splendid palaces, gold and ironwork, dignified ceremonial and rich royal collections. Baroque monumental stucco blends beautifully with the colourful plastered walls of the medieval Old Town. The clear northern light falling across these surfaces, especially during the endless northern summer evenings, intensifies the freshness and cleanliness of even the most venerable districts. Modern Stockholm is a bustling business hub for the entire Baltic region yet anglers can still catch salmon in the centre of the city. Sweden was the envy of less dynamic economies during the 1960s and 1970s, with Stockholm a trading and commercial centre to be reckoned with, as anyone who has ever used an Ericsson mobile phone or an Ikea chair can testify. Swedish design genius, aesthetic and technical know-how, has ensured that many professionals in the creative and IT fields look to Stockholm for inspiration and partnership. Prosperous, efficient and well-scrubbed, Stockholm balances its economic vigour with a remarkably unspoilt natural charm. With 30% of the city area made up of waterways and another 30% parks and green spaces, it has perhaps the freshest air and widest lungs of any European capital. But it has nightlife and a restaurant culture that belie any impression of a quiet garden city; Stockholm has almost as many restaurants per capita as Paris and a night in the hotspots of Stureplan should be enough to satisfy even the most demanding clubber. Sweden is the world's third most successful exporter of pop music behind the United States and Britain, a process that began with Abba's global success in the 1970s. A good night out here can soon blow away any clichés about Nordic gloom. And Stockholm's 150 or so museums and galleries means there's plenty to do on rainy days. Light on water and pure air may be the strongest impression a visitor carries away from Stockholm, especially in the summer, but they might equally be thinking of a particularly rowdy night in the Pelikan Bar on Södermalm, or hot jazz in the Lydmar Hotel. The entire world may descend on Stockholm each December for the Nobel Prize ceremonies, but they arrive in the winter cold and darkness; the smiles of a summer night are far more inviting for the traveller.

Day 49Port of Call Helsinki Arrival 10:00amDeparture 11:59pm

Overview

Surrounded by the sea and archipelago, Helsinki offers you an exciting city vacation or a relaxing retreat in beautiful natural surroundings. There is plenty to see and experience throughout the year. Helsinki offers a diverse cultural life, architectural gems an quality shopping opportunities. Daily guided tours, dozens of intersting museums and countless other sights guarantee that time will simply fly when you visit Helsinki! Helsinki is a city of contrasts in which the urban lifestyle is flavoured by the sea and surrounding nature. The summer heat and midnight sun inspire the city's inhabitants to occupy the many parks and terraces in the centre of town. During the winter season, the city's active cultural life offers something for everyone. Sunny days are perfect for walking on the frozen sea, while the fascinating darkness is ideal for exploring the nightlife. Helsinki is a modern capital that is both youthful and relaxed and where friendly people always feel themselves welcome.

Day 50Port of Call Tallinn Arrival 6:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

The story of Tallinn is a tale of three cities: an ancient citadel, the old town, and the modern city. Capital of the Estonian Republic, the coastal settlement is almost opposite Helsinki on the Gulf of Finland. The citadel, known as Toompea Castle, sits on a craggy hill peering down on a fascinating amalgam of medieval rooftops and winding cobbled streets, punctuated here and there by graceful spires and turreted towers. Around this ancient core, building continues constantly, and Tallinn today is the major industrial centre in Estonia. Tallinn is now the home of no less than six theatres and is famous throughout the Baltic for its song festivals, where massed choirs sing to packed audiences in a huge open-air stadium. Sailing, too, is an important recreation. Tallinn-made yachts are renowned, and in 1980 the city hosted the yachting events for Moscow's Olympics. Tallinn enjoys a mild climate, with summer 'white nights', when sunset blends into sunrise, rivalling those of St Petersburg.

Day 51 Cruising
Day 52Port of Call Copenhagen Arrival 6:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Copenhagen, the royal capital of Denmark with 1.9 million inhabitants (Copenhagen Metropolitan Area), is one of Europe's oldest and most wonderful capitals. The city's location in the most dynamic region of Northern Europe, the oresund Region, makes a visit even more exciting. If you like to shop you'll love Copenhagen ! Whether you're into world-famous Danish design or major brands like Gucci or Vuitton you'll find it here along with super trendy Dansih designers of today.Accomondations range from youth hostels to 5-star hotels. Theatres, museums, art galleries and musical entertainment are other attractions which will make your stay in royal Copenhagen memorable. Whether you're visiting Copenhagen for business or pleasure, you'll find whatever you're looking for right here.

Day 53 Lysekil Arrival 9:00amDeparture 9:00pm
Day 54Port of Call Oslo Arrival 7:00am

Overview

Situated at the head of the Oslofjord, Oslo is the oldest Scandinavian capital, and features a charming mix of old and new architecture, together with acclaimed museums, parks and monuments, making it a relaxing and rewarding holiday destination. The highlight of a visit to Oslo is the 13th century medieval Akershus Fortress, featuring creepy dungeons with dark, damp cells, magnificent banquet halls and ornate staterooms, and a charming chapel which contains the crypts of King Hĺkon VII and Olav V. It was used by the Nazis during WW II as a prison and place of execution but is now occupied by the Norway Resistance Museum, which has a variety of exhibits of Norwegian life under German occupation. The grounds surrounding the fortress are perfect for picnics and relaxation, and afford spectacular views of the city and harbor. Norway is famous for its artists, and two of them are celebrated in museums in Oslo. The Munch Museum contains a collection of more than 5000 drawings and paintings by Norway's most famous artist. Munch's most famous painting, The Scream, resides in the National Gallery. Nearby, Vigeland Museum and Park showcases the works of the renowned sculptor Gustav Vigeland amid a beautiful expanse of trees, grass, and ponds. Another artistic attraction is the National Theatre, with its superb rococo hall. Oslo has plenty of luxurious accommodations, excellent restaurants and charming cafes. The nightlife is numerous and varied, with bars, clubs and pubs to suit all tastes. A rewarding excursion can be made to the nearby Bygdřy Peninsula, located across the harbour from Oslo. It features a large open-air folk museum, maritime museums housing excavated Viking ships and Thor Heyerdahl's balsa raft Kon-Tiki; restored stave churches; and some pretty beaches. Further afield is the Nordmarka, a wilderness area on Oslo's northern border, and the quaint fishing village of Risor, with its picturesque harbour and island of Stangholmen. International airlines link Oslo with most major European cities, and transportation options into the city are numerous and reliable

Day 55Port of Call OsloDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Situated at the head of the Oslofjord, Oslo is the oldest Scandinavian capital, and features a charming mix of old and new architecture, together with acclaimed museums, parks and monuments, making it a relaxing and rewarding holiday destination. The highlight of a visit to Oslo is the 13th century medieval Akershus Fortress, featuring creepy dungeons with dark, damp cells, magnificent banquet halls and ornate staterooms, and a charming chapel which contains the crypts of King Hĺkon VII and Olav V. It was used by the Nazis during WW II as a prison and place of execution but is now occupied by the Norway Resistance Museum, which has a variety of exhibits of Norwegian life under German occupation. The grounds surrounding the fortress are perfect for picnics and relaxation, and afford spectacular views of the city and harbor. Norway is famous for its artists, and two of them are celebrated in museums in Oslo. The Munch Museum contains a collection of more than 5000 drawings and paintings by Norway's most famous artist. Munch's most famous painting, The Scream, resides in the National Gallery. Nearby, Vigeland Museum and Park showcases the works of the renowned sculptor Gustav Vigeland amid a beautiful expanse of trees, grass, and ponds. Another artistic attraction is the National Theatre, with its superb rococo hall. Oslo has plenty of luxurious accommodations, excellent restaurants and charming cafes. The nightlife is numerous and varied, with bars, clubs and pubs to suit all tastes. A rewarding excursion can be made to the nearby Bygdřy Peninsula, located across the harbour from Oslo. It features a large open-air folk museum, maritime museums housing excavated Viking ships and Thor Heyerdahl's balsa raft Kon-Tiki; restored stave churches; and some pretty beaches. Further afield is the Nordmarka, a wilderness area on Oslo's northern border, and the quaint fishing village of Risor, with its picturesque harbour and island of Stangholmen. International airlines link Oslo with most major European cities, and transportation options into the city are numerous and reliable

Day 56Port of Call Kristiansand Arrival 7:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Kristiansand is a city in southern Norway. Its old town, Posebyen, features traditional wooden houses. In the center, neo-Gothic Kristiansand Cathedral is near the Sørlandets Museum, which displays Norwegian art from 1800 to today. The southeastern shoreline includes the Bystranda city beach, the 17th-century Christiansholm Fortress rotunda and Fiskebrygga quay, lined with fishmongers selling their catch.

Day 57Port of Call Stavanger Arrival 7:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Stavanger, the oil capital of Norway, is actually a medieval city. Although it didn't gain city status until 1125 when construction of the beautiful medieval cathedral began, the area has been populated for over 10,000 years. The city is an exciting combination of old and new. Narrow lanes and white timber houses are all in well preserved traditional style, from classic style to funkis. It is a modern city with a wide variety of shops, cafes and restaurants. Contrast characterises this city, the people who live there, the surrounding landscape - and the weather! All this makes Stavanger a pleasant and very charming city. Stavanger is also the centre of higher education in Rogaland county. It has a number of cultural institutions including international, British and French schools because of the great influx of foreigners connected to the oil industry and to the "Emigration Centre for Genealogical Studies and Contact Between Norway and North America". The Canning Museum is the only one of its kind in the world and testifies to what has been an important industry for Stavanger. Among the many other attractions are the theatre and the symphonic orchestra that has its home in the beautifully situated Kulturhuset.

Day 58Port of Call Olden Arrival 11:00amDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

On the shores of the Nordfjord, little Olden is a gateway to a spectacular ice wilderness of stunning dimensions. Climb an amazing zig-zag road past towering cliffs and tumbling waterfalls to the giant Jostedal glacier--the largest icefield in Europe, where summer skiers zip over ice moguls! Or take a horse-drawn carriage to a beautiful lake watered by the blue ice massif of Briksdal Glacier.

Day 59Port of Call Kristiansund Arrival 8:00amDeparture 9:00pm

Overview

Almost entirely destroyed by World War II, the coastal town of Kristiansund N is spread over three islands and has been rebuilt into a modern city. Today it's the main service base for oil activities on the mid-Norwegian continental shelf. The Draugen and Åsgåd oil fields lie off its coast. With a population of 17,000 citizens, Kristiansund makes a good stopover for those who have made it all the way to the fjord country's northern outposts. The city itself looks dull and modern, although the setting is panoramic. Its harbor is one of the finest along the western coast of Norway. Since the 18th century, Kristiansund is often written with an "N," so visitors won't confuse it with the largest city along the southern coast of Norway -- Kristiansand S. In its early days, cod fishing was the mainstay of its industry. A drying process took place on shore, producing klippfish or dried cod, which kept many a homeowner in food for the winter.

Day 60Port of Call Trondheim Arrival 7:00amDeparture 4:00pm

Overview

Trondheim, or Nidaros as it used to be called, was the first capital of Norway. The Sagas tell us how King Olav Tryggvason of Viking fame founded the city by the mouth of the River Nidelva in 997. Today Trondheim is a modern city, a centre of knowledge with a highly respected university, many popular colleges and a research community ranking among the best in Europe. You will find a wide variety of cultural and recreational activities in Trondheim. Here you can experience both the charm and intimacy of the small town and the plethora of choices of big-city life. While in Trondheim, you might want to visit Lerkendal, Trondheim’s football stadium, where many a mighty European football team has fallen to the powerful perennial contender in the Champions League - Rosenborg Ballklub. You will find the people of Trondheim friendly and sociable. Trondheim is a very hospitable city, with its doors open wide to the world.

Day 61 Cruising
Day 62Port of Call Hammerfest Arrival 7:00amDeparture 10:00pm

Overview

Hammerfest is the world's northernmost town, with a population of 9000. The town celebrated its 200th annivesary on the 17th of July 1987. It Covers an area of 884 square kilometres. Fishing has always been important for the community and many workers are employed by the industry. Tourism is another important industry and 350,000 tourists visit the town each year. Finnmark's central hospital is located in Hammerfest. Communications are well developed with an airport, and daily boat and bus services. Hammerfest is a modern town with a rich and varied cultural life. There are sports clubs, an alpine centre, a choir, and a brass band. The college at Hammerfest is located near the hospital, about a 15 minutes walk from the towncentre, with a regular bus service. Hammerfest has a charming town centre with many shops, cafés, pubs, and restaurants. Hammerfest Church has no altar piece and one of the front walls is a large intense stained-glass painting. Hammerfest Catholic Church, home of the world’s northernmost Catholic congregation. The Meridian Monument - erected to commemorate the first international committee to measure the size of the Earth in 1816. The Ancient and Royal Polar Bear Society is a museum featuring themes from Hammerfest’s time as the starting point for whaling and sealing expeditions to the Arctic. The Arctic Sea Gate is the meridians reach towards the north - crowned with Hammerfest’s coat of arms. The icebergs and polar bears show Hammerfest’s history as the gate to the Arctic.

Day 63Port of Call Honningsvag Arrival 7:00amDeparture 3:00pm

Overview

The village of Honningsvaag is just 1,200 miles from the North Pole, and you can stand on the 1,000 feet cliffs at Europe's northernmost point, the Northern Cape, to see the phenomenon known as the "Midnight Sun" hanging above the Arctic Ocean. Honningsvag is actually located on the island of Mageroya, just off the northern coast of Norway and is the largest fishing village in Finnmark. It was completely rebuilt after WW2. Honningsvag is the northernmost village in the world, and that is definitely their claim to fame. The lovely citizens of Honningsvag hold the North Cape Festival every year celebrating their culture and heritage, as well as the uniqueness of their wonderful town. If you like fishing, then you will adore Honningsvag, because the harbor is beautiful, and the fish are leaping at the chance to get a bite of what's on your hook. This harbor region provides access to the entire North Cape, and in fact, Honningsvag itself is the actual gateway. In 1944, the German Nazis came through this area and literally destroyed the city. Everything was completely demolished except for the chapel, and the some of the locals still recall the carnage. Thankfully, both the chapel and the spirits of the strong-willed members of this close-knit society survived the attacks, and today Honningsvag is a wonderful and charming town with no upheaval or unrest. You are sure to have an extraordinary time in this exquisite northern environment, full of aesthetic beauty and friendly Norwegians. The falling snow and crisp, fresh air will clear out your lungs and reinvigorate you into a whole new person. A trip to Honningsvag is a blissful and life-affirming adventure.

Day 64Port of Call Tromso Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Tromso, town in northern Norway, capital of Troms County. Tromsø is located on the island of Tromsoy off the northwestern coast of mainland Norway, in the Norwegian Sea. It is the largest Norwegian town north of the Arctic Circle. Troms County includes the adjacent mainland; Tromsoy Island is linked to the mainland by a bridge. As the county seat, Tromsø is the administrative, communications, cultural, and educational center of northern Norway. It is also a fishing port with fish-processing industries. Other industries include shipbuilding, brewing, prefabricated houses, high technology, and tourism. The town is served by an airport and is a starting point and support base for arctic expeditions. A meteorological station, an institute studying the aurora borealis, or northern lights, and the University of Tromsø (founded in 1968) are all located in Tromso. Tromso was founded in the mid-13th century, and granted a town charter in 1794. The Norwegian government was based in Tromsø for a short period during World War II (1939-1945). The modern Tromsdal Church, built in 1965, is known as the “Cathedral of the Arctic;” there is also a wooden cathedral (1861) in the center of the town. Tromso Museum contains an aquarium, and is devoted to natural history and to the history and culture of the Saami (Lapp).

Day 65Port of Call Leknes Arrival 9:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Leknes is the municipality's center of administration and trade, with about 1,600 inhabitants and well-developed services, including hotels, cafes, restaurants, auto repair shops, specialty shops, a pharmacy, bakery, movie theatre, swimming pool, and other services. The newspaper «Lofot-Tidende» is published here.

Day 66 Cruising
Day 67Port of Call Alesund Arrival 7:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Alesund is a port town on the west coast of Norway, at the entrance to the Geirangerfjord. It’s known for the art nouveau architectural style in which most of the town was rebuilt after a fire in 1904, as documented at the Jugendstilsenteret museum. There are panoramic views of Ålesund’s architecture, the surrounding archipelago and fjords from the Mount Aksla lookout.

Day 68Port of Call Lerwick Arrival 10:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Lerwick, the lively capital of Shetland, centres around its important and busy harbour, particularly during the summer months, when yachts, cruise liners, private yachts and motor cruisers arrive from ports all around the North Atlantic. Lerwick has a population of around 7,500, approximately one third of Shetland's total population. The shops, pubs, restaurants, hotels and guesthouses bustle all year with locals, visiting businessmen, tourists and seafarers. A mix of old and new, the town offers visitors a range of things to do and see. Places of interest include Clickimin Broch - an outstanding example of Bronze Age and Iron Age architecture; Fort Charlotte - built in 1665 and having good views from the gunports; the Bod of Gremista - an 18th century fishing booth; and the picture-postcard Lodberries - old merchants' houses with their own piers. The Museum has a fascinating collection of artefacts illustrating Shetland's history. Elsewhere special exhibitions depict Shetland tradition and crafts - knitting, spinning, lace-making, fiddle music and Up Helly Aa.

Day 69Port of Call Invergordon Arrival 9:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Invergordon is a town whose history stretches back through two World Wars and has now developed into a centre for oilrig refurbishment and maintenance. It is also a major port of call for cruise liners, being the only deep water port in the area, 40 liners, with 21,000 visitors from all over the world, berthed in 2004. Ideally situated in the centre of the eastern Highlands, the town's High Street has recently been given a face lift with coloured granite blocks, speed controllers, a new restaurant and a mural has been painted on the Albyn Housing building. There are many places to eat, providing quick take-away food right through to a quality country house hotel and restaurant just inland from the town, Indian and Chinese food is also available as an alternative to the more traditional fayre. There is an Arts Centre, a Leisure and Sports Club, with swimming pool and an 18 hole golf course on the outskirts of town.

Day 70 Cruising
Day 71Port of Call IJmuiden Arrival 7:00amDeparture 4:00pm

Overview

IJmuiden lies near the mouth of the North Sea Canal, which connects the capital city Amsterdam, 24 km (15 mi) to the east, with the North Sea. The North Sea locks near IJmuiden together form the largest sea lock complex in the world. The majority of fish in the Netherlands is sold via IJmuiden. This city not only boasts the largest fishing harbour in Europe, but also the largest fish auction in the Netherlands.

Day 71Port of Call Amsterdam Arrival 6:00pm

Overview

Amsterdam is the Netherlands’ capital, known for its artistic heritage, elaborate canal system and narrow houses with gabled facades, legacies of the city’s 17th-century Golden Age. Its Museum District houses the Van Gogh Museum, works by Rembrandt and Vermeer at the Rijksmuseum, and modern art at the Stedelijk. Cycling is key to the city’s character, and there are numerous bike paths.

Day 72Port of Call AmsterdamDeparture 5:30pm

Overview

Amsterdam is the Netherlands’ capital, known for its artistic heritage, elaborate canal system and narrow houses with gabled facades, legacies of the city’s 17th-century Golden Age. Its Museum District houses the Van Gogh Museum, works by Rembrandt and Vermeer at the Rijksmuseum, and modern art at the Stedelijk. Cycling is key to the city’s character, and there are numerous bike paths.

Day 73Port of Call Zeebrugge Arrival 7:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Linked with Brugge, its historic metropolis, by a 7.5 mile canal, Zeebrugge is a seaside resort looking to the future. The international port, jutting far out into the sea, doesn't prevent holidaymakers from frolicking on the fine little sandy beach. On the sea front, hotels and cafés give tourists their warmest welcome. Being Belgium's leading fishing port, Zeebrugge has quite a lot of fishmongers' shops. Besides being a passenger port with regular ferry services between the United Kingdom and the continent, Zeebrugge also has an attractive marina which can accommodate some 100 vessels. Zeebrugge also enjoys a very convenient geographical location, just a few miles away from beautiful Brugge, the fashionable sea resort of Knokke, and the picturesque village of Lissewege. During the summer season the beach invites to (sun) bathing, playing and relaxing. Autumn and winter are the right seasons to take a firm walk along the seaside. On the western dam, a promenade reaches far out into the open sea. At the foot of the dam the "St. George Memorial" commemorates the Battle of Zeebrugge (23.4.1918) on which occasion the British Royal Navy finally put the German U-Boot base out of action. The City Community House on Marktplein is the seat of the city administration. The premises also have a socio-cultural function.

Day 74Port of Call Saint Peter Port Arrival 10:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

St Peter Port, Guernsey's main town, is built into a steep valley leading down to the harbour, with spectacular views across to Alderney and the other islands. It has the most sheltered anchorage in the Channel Island and it has been a haven and eventually a harbour for over 2000 years. St Peter Port has been rated amongst the 50 most historic towns in England and Wales. Despite the predominance of international banks based here, the town has managed to retain its 17th century charm. The granite buildings now occupied by shops were once the homes of the town's wealthy residence and the High Street still has its original cobbles. The town was put on the map in 1855 when Victor Hugo, exiled from France, made his home at Hauteville House. Here he wrote Les Miserables. Renoir also painted a number of his masterpieces here. Several guided walking tours of St Peter Port begin at the Tourist Information Bureau during the summer months.

Day 75 Cruising
Day 76Port of Call Bordeaux Arrival 8:00am

Overview

Visit a bottle of wine. It’s no secret. That’s what Bordeaux is known for and how you’ll likely spend your time in the world’s largest, premium wine district – savoring the wine and the sights. Bordeaux has long been synonymous with fine wines. Situated in the southwest of France in a graceful crescent along a bend in the Garonne River, you’ll find the region that delivers the full-bodied beverages known the world over. Connected to the Bay of Biscay and the Atlantic Ocean by the Gironde River (so wide it appears to be an inlet), the inland port of Bordeaux has been an important trading center since before the Roman era. (The city was founded in 3rd century BC by a Celtic tribe.) Bordeaux became incredibly prosperous during the 18th century, when the city was France’s most important port, and a hub for trade to and from the New World. Though its shipping industry has since declined, Bordeaux continues to be a regional transportation center, and its good fortune continues today with wine exports totaling the equivalent of nearly $10 billion US dollars each year. It was the Romans – not the French – who planted the first grape vines along the Garonne River in the 1st century BC. Wine became the life-blood of the region early on, and in many ways still is. Peak wine production in the 13th century produced export numbers that were not exceeded until the 1950s! The Bordeaux region is one of the largest purveyors of wine in the world, producing over half a billion bottles a year – more than 50% of France’s output. Area vineyards stretch to cover over 520 square miles producing wine that’s shipped to over 160 countries worldwide. No doubt, you’ve sampled more than a few of those bottles. Most of us have. But there is more to Bordeaux than wine. Most business and commercial areas are centered in the relatively small 18th century downtown area. The buildings that line the quays present stunning examples of the architecture of the Siecle des Lumieres, the Century of Enlightenment. The Place de la Bourse typifies this elegant style, with its slate roof, lower level arcades, and carved faces adorning the keystones of the arches. You can also visit the nearby Palais Gallien, a ruined Roman amphitheater; the Grand Theatre, the inspiration for the famed Paris Opera House; and the Musee des Beaux Arts, which features an impressive collection of French paintings. But art and architecture are not the only things the French do well. Gourmet dining is a specialty here, so be sure to indulge in a grand dinner with a fine regional wine. Gourmet shopping, of course, goes hand in hand with dining so take a stroll down the Rue Sainte Catherine, Porte Dijeaux, and the Course de Il’intendance, where you’ll find fresh foie gras, truffles, fine cheeses, and a broad selection of wines to enjoy right here or take home for later.

Day 77Port of Call BordeauxDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Visit a bottle of wine. It’s no secret. That’s what Bordeaux is known for and how you’ll likely spend your time in the world’s largest, premium wine district – savoring the wine and the sights. Bordeaux has long been synonymous with fine wines. Situated in the southwest of France in a graceful crescent along a bend in the Garonne River, you’ll find the region that delivers the full-bodied beverages known the world over. Connected to the Bay of Biscay and the Atlantic Ocean by the Gironde River (so wide it appears to be an inlet), the inland port of Bordeaux has been an important trading center since before the Roman era. (The city was founded in 3rd century BC by a Celtic tribe.) Bordeaux became incredibly prosperous during the 18th century, when the city was France’s most important port, and a hub for trade to and from the New World. Though its shipping industry has since declined, Bordeaux continues to be a regional transportation center, and its good fortune continues today with wine exports totaling the equivalent of nearly $10 billion US dollars each year. It was the Romans – not the French – who planted the first grape vines along the Garonne River in the 1st century BC. Wine became the life-blood of the region early on, and in many ways still is. Peak wine production in the 13th century produced export numbers that were not exceeded until the 1950s! The Bordeaux region is one of the largest purveyors of wine in the world, producing over half a billion bottles a year – more than 50% of France’s output. Area vineyards stretch to cover over 520 square miles producing wine that’s shipped to over 160 countries worldwide. No doubt, you’ve sampled more than a few of those bottles. Most of us have. But there is more to Bordeaux than wine. Most business and commercial areas are centered in the relatively small 18th century downtown area. The buildings that line the quays present stunning examples of the architecture of the Siecle des Lumieres, the Century of Enlightenment. The Place de la Bourse typifies this elegant style, with its slate roof, lower level arcades, and carved faces adorning the keystones of the arches. You can also visit the nearby Palais Gallien, a ruined Roman amphitheater; the Grand Theatre, the inspiration for the famed Paris Opera House; and the Musee des Beaux Arts, which features an impressive collection of French paintings. But art and architecture are not the only things the French do well. Gourmet dining is a specialty here, so be sure to indulge in a grand dinner with a fine regional wine. Gourmet shopping, of course, goes hand in hand with dining so take a stroll down the Rue Sainte Catherine, Porte Dijeaux, and the Course de Il’intendance, where you’ll find fresh foie gras, truffles, fine cheeses, and a broad selection of wines to enjoy right here or take home for later.

Day 78Port of Call Saint-Jean-de-Luz Arrival 7:00amDeparture 2:00pm

Overview

Saint-Jean-de-Luz is a fishing town at the mouth of the Nivelle river, in southwest France’s Basque country. The Saint-Jean-Baptiste Church, where King Louis XIV married Marie-Therese of Spain in 1660, has a gilded baroque altarpiece and wooden galleries. The turreted Maison Louis XIV is a museum that recreates 17th-century domestic life with period furniture. It includes the King’s Chamber, where Louis XIV slept.

Day 79Port of Call Ferrol Arrival 10:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Ferrol is an important naval station, with one of the largest natural harbors in Spain. The entrance to the harbor is a narrow, fortified strait, through which only one ship at a time can pass. The city is the site of a naval wireless telegraphic station and a large naval arsenal, with a basin containing two dry docks, foundries, and workshops. Nearby is the La Graña submarine base. The industries in the city center around the construction and repair of the ships and docks. Originally a fishing village, El Ferrol was selected (1726) by Charles IV, king of Spain, as a suitable site for a naval station, and a few years later the shipbuilding yards were constructed. El Ferrol is the birthplace of the Spanish dictator Francisco Franco (who was called El Caudillo). It was captured by Franco's army in 1936, soon after the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War.

Day 80Port of Call Porto Arrival 9:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Porto is the second largest city in Portugal. The greatest sites in Porto are its five bridges, three modern, two nineteenth century and all of them sensational. The valleys and tributaries that run along them form some of the most spectacular landscapes in the the country. The wealth that flowed into the city from the 15th century onward is evidenced throughout Porto. Trade in the commodities from Portugal’s newly claimed lands brought Brazilian gold and exotic woods to embellish Porto’s many elaborate churches and palaces. Prosperous merchants spent lavishly on paintings and the ever famous azulejos. The true fascination with Porto lies very much in the day-to-day life of the place, with its prosperous business core surrounded by well to do suburbs as well as depressed housing estates, tempered by a heart of cramped streets and ancient alleys wholly untouched by the planners. Porto is renowned for the great variety of light, fresh and often fizzy wines as well as the heavyweight Port wines. Vinho verde ‘sparkling wine’, is grown in the northwest. Country wines from the northeast are made in the area between the Spanish border to the north and east and four mountain ranges to the west. The Vinho verde region is best known for its slightly under-ripe wines, with a slightly sparkling character. They are mainly white, and the best are made from the alvarinho grape, as well as the azal, ljurerio and rabigato. Wines from the Douro region are beginning to be accepted as some of Portugal’s finest. Although excellent white wines are produced here, the area is best known for its great reds. The accommodations in Porto range from inexpensive rooms (south east of Sao Bento station) that will fit just about any budget to more expensive places around the city. They are generally a good value but in winter investing in a more expensive place with better facilities to counter the freezing cold is worth the a little extra.

Day 81Port of Call Lisbon Arrival 7:00amDeparture 4:00pm

Overview

Lisbon is Portugal’s hilly, coastal capital city. From imposing São Jorge Castle, the view encompasses the old city’s pastel-colored buildings, Tagus Estuary and Ponte 25 de Abril suspension bridge. Nearby, the National Azulejo Museum displays 5 centuries of decorative ceramic tiles. Just outside Lisbon is a string of Atlantic beaches, from Cascais to Estoril.

Day 82Port of Call Cadiz Arrival 10:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

The city of Cadiz, which practically accounts for the whole of the municipal area, lies to the east of the bay of the same name, in an area which could be described as half island, half peninsula, connected to the mainland by a slender, sandy strip. Its situation is responsible for its obvious maritime tendencies, and it has been totally dedicated to seafaring pursuits since its foundation. The Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans and Arabs all passed through what is believed to be the western world’s oldest city, and it was here that Spain’s first democratic Constitution was drawn up. Despite its essentially urban nature, it also boasts areas of natural interest, such as the beaches of La Cortadura and El Chato, as well as Santibanez Mud Flats, which are part of Cadiz Bay Natural Park. The city, popularly known as “La Tacita de Plata” (The Silver Cup), has an unmistakable marine flavour, and its people are famous for their good humour and hospitality, as witnessed by the famous carnival; it boasts monuments of great interest, such as the Cathedral, the city walls, Holy Cross Parish Church, the Genoese Park, Puerta de la Caleta, etc. All places of indubitable charm, to which we must add the city’s cuisine and beaches, famous for their beauty, such as La Caleta, Santa Maria del Mar and La Victoria. History This legendary city was founded by the Phoenicians in 1100, although the oldest archaeological remains date back to around 800 B.C. Mythology links its foundation with Hercules and the legendary Tartessia. The Phoenicians called the city Gadir, meaning “closed area”. They built a commercial factory and a temple in honour of the god Melkart In 206 B.C. it was joined with Rome as an allied city under the name Gades. This was the start of one of the most prosperous periods in Cadiz’s history, and it became one of the most important cities in the Roman Empire. In the Imperial age, it was known as “Augusta Urbs Julia Gaditana”. Its inhabitants were soon granted Roman citizenship. When the Moslem invasions began in the 8th century, it provided the armies with significant support by facilitating their passage, though it soon suffered a decline in importance which would prevail until the Christian conquest and re-settlement at the hands of Alfonso X, known as The Wise, between 1260 and 1262. During the 15th century, the city’s economic activity was based essentially on sea commerce, particularly in North Africa. In 1493, the Catholic Monarchs made Cadiz Crown property; it had belonged to the Ponce de Leon estate since 1470. With the discovery of America, Cadiz’s rise to greatness began, culminating in the 18th century. Its natural conditions meant that whenever it was impossible for ships to berth in Seville, they could do so in Cadiz. In 1717, Seville’s Contracting House was moved to Cadiz, the monopoly of American trade travelling with it; however, this situation was short-lived, as the concession to trade with the New World was extended to twelve ports in 1778. The town centre was consolidated in the 18th and 19th centuries, when urban renovation was carried out and most of the monuments and buildings that we know today were built. La Isla del Leon, now San Fernando, was the setting for the earliest meetings of the famous Cadiz Cortes, general constituent assemblies set up to provide Spain with a Constitution during the war of independence. Fleeing from the French, the Government took refuge near Cadiz, the only stronghold that the French were unable to capture during the whole of the war. Between 1810 and 1811, Government assemblies took place in La Isla de Leon Theatre; in February 1811, the proximity of Napoleon’s troops forced them to move to San Felipe de Neri Church in Cadiz, returning once more to La Isla de Leon before finally making their definitive journey back to Madrid in 1813. After the war, the city continued at the vanguard of liberalism, with its support for Riego in 1820 and its leading role in the face of the French invasion in 1823. In a similar vein, Cadiz was at the forefront of the 1868 uprising. At the end of the 19th century, the city’s economic decline began. A series of events including the loss of the colonial market, culminating in the 1898 Disaster, and the African War, among others, ushered in a crisis that was to have grave consequences.

Day 83 Cruising
Day 84Port of Call Barcelona Arrival 7:00am

Overview

Barcelona is a charming, cosmopolitan port on the shores of the Mediterranean sea. This prosperous and bilingual (Spanish and Catalan) metropolis measures up to a city such as Madrid: its museums, theaters, art galleries and nightlife area of an impressive high standard. Besides that, this art and design centre has a lot of interesting sights to offer to its visitors. The best place to watch people go by, to stroll or simply relax, is 'Las Ramblas', a pedestrian street with dozens of outdoor cafes. Here, you’ll find flower-stands, book kiosks and small market stalls where they sell birds and small animals. You’ll also find an endlessly fascinating flowing receptacle of pageant-jugglers, singers, dancers, puppeteers, sidewalk artists, living statues and assorted oddballs on parade. Nearby is 'Plaça Real', with plenty of bars and restaurants, and 'Palau Guell', built by the Catalan architectural genius Antoni Gaudi in his undulating art-nouveau style. After having seen these sights, stroll the narrow winding streets of the 'Barri Gotic', the medieval Gothic quarter full of interesting tapas bars and cafes. Check out Picasso’s old hangout, 'Els Quatre Gats', which has been renovated without losing its bohemian charm. Or head for the old Barceloneta section on the waterfront. This working-class area, which was always slightly rundown and scruffy-looking, is now packed with paella restaurants. The new beach area, which runs from Barceloneta to the Olympic village, is much cleaner than the old beach area. Although some people believe that it has been cleaned up considerably, it might be a wise idea to stay out of the water. Fortunately, the beach itself is already a feast for the eyes (and ears), with its huge and roaring waves.

Onboard the Seven Seas Mariner

Costco Member Reviews

4.6 of 5 stars4.6/5 (165 Reviews)

Ship Rating

4.0/5

The world’s first all-suite, all-balcony ship, Seven Seas Mariner® features four gourmet restaurants with open seating. Hallmarks include generous amenities and a welcome spaciousness throughout the ship. Catering to only 700 pampered guests, her staff-to-guest ratio of 1 to 1.6 ensures the absolutely highest level of personal service.

Onboard Activities

Activities & Services (included in cruise)

Pool

  • Card Room
  • Casino
  • Disco/Nightclub
  • Movies
  • Fitness Center
  • Sauna/Steam Room
  • Educational Programs
  • Pool - Outdoor
  • Sports Facilities
  • Whirlpool/Jacuzzi
  • Bars/Lounges
  • Library
  • Wi-Fi
  • Organized Age Specific Activities
  • Teen Programs
  • Business Center
  • Concierge Desk
  • Dry Cleaning/ Laundry Service
  • Duty-Free Shops/Boutiques
  • Elevators

Activities & Services (available for an extra fee)

Full-Service Spa

  • Beauty Salon
  • Full-Service Spa
  • Babysitting
  • Infirmary/Medical Center

Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the cruise line without notice. Staterooms designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Dining

Compass Rose

Specialty Dining

Chartreuse: Featuring a classic French menu with a modern twist, Chartreuse evokes memories of a chic Parisian fine dining restaurant discovered during an evening stroll. Wherever you are seated in this regal restaurant, you will be treated to a succulent dinner while enjoying incredible ocean views. The restaurant ambiance is complemented by a menu that features dishes expertly prepared using both classic and modern techniques for a multiple course celebration of French gastronomy.

Compass Rose: Much thought was given to the design of Compass Rose, the flagship restaurant of Regent Seven Seas fleet. The dining room is outfitted with rich woods contrasted by light marble stones and mother of pearl shimmering brightly with an elegant color theme of light shades of blue, white, gold and silver. Compass Rose delights with a beautifully defined atmosphere and transitions from refreshing natural light during the day to a romantic ice blue lighting theme at night. This is the perfect setting for you to enjoy your breakfast, lunch and dinner, where the menu features an exceptional variety of Continental cuisine.

Prime 7: A true classic in every sense, Prime 7 sets a new standard in steakhouse fare with its contemporary interpretation of an American favorite. Handsomely decorated with supple leather wing-back chairs, burnished woods and rich earth-toned fabrics, Prime 7 exudes a distinct, intimate elegance. All the traditional starters are here, including Jumbo Lump Crab Cakes, Classic Steak Tartare, and Clam Chowder. Of course, beef is the undisputed star, and it is all USDA Prime and Dry-Aged at least 28 days to ensure the ultimate tenderness, juiciness and flavor. Prime New York Strip, Porterhouse Steak and succulent Filet Mignon only touch upon the selections. Mouthwatering alternatives include Alaskan King Crab Legs and Dover Sole. Prime 7 is open for dinner only and reservations are required.

Sette Mari at La Veranda: Each evening, La Veranda transforms into Sette Mari at La Veranda, a casual, intimate dining experience. Enjoy an extensive menu of authentic antipasti and Italian specialties served á la carte and paired with fine Italian wines — complimentary of course. Delectable dishes are prepared á la minute by talented chefs using only the freshest gourmet ingredients and served by attentive waiters. Sette Mari at La Veranda is open for dinner only.

 

Casual Dining

Coffee Connection: Your informal destination to relax, meet fellow guests and enjoy coffee and snacks throughout the day. While snacking, international newspapers and news magazines are available for your perusal.

La Veranda: Serving breakfast and lunch, La Veranda is exceedingly popular any time of the day. Spacious and comfortably casual, La Veranda offers regional specialties that often reflect the cuisines of the countries called on. Dishes are presented in a buffet style that displays the diversity of the menu. La Veranda also features an authentic pizzeria and a shaded, open-air veranda for dining al fresco.

Pool Grill: The Pool Grill is open-air, yet abundantly shaded for comfortable dining. Enjoy grilled-to-order burgers, grilled seafood, sandwiches, and fresh salads. Treat yourself to milkshakes and malts or an old-fashioned hand-dipped ice cream dessert sprinkled with all your favorite toppings.

Room Service: Complimentary 24-hour dining in the comfort of your stateroom.


Times, costs and other specifics are outside the control of Costco Travel. All information is at the sole discretion of the cruise line and is subject to change without notice. Dining time and table size preferences are submitted to the cruise line on a first-come, first-served request basis and are confirmed aboard ship. Questions, concerns and/or special needs regarding dining arrangements must be addressed with the maitre d' hotel aboard ship. Every effort is made to accommodate travelers' preferences; however, Costco Travel cannot guarantee dining arrangements. In specialty restaurants, space is limited and reservations are recommended. A cover charge and dress code may apply.

Staterooms

Features a European king-size bed, a sitting area, a marble bathroom, a walk-in closet and a balcony. Concierge Level is available.

Deluxe Suite (Category: H)

Category: H
Deluxe suite; 301 sq.ft.; 252 sq.ft.; Balcony: 49 sq.ft.

Deluxe Suite (Category: G)

Category: G
Deluxe suite; 301 sq.ft.; 252 sq.ft.; Balcony: 49 sq.ft.

Deluxe Suite (Category: F)

Category: F
Deluxe suite; 301 sq.ft.; 252 sq.ft.; Balcony: 49 sq.ft.

Spacious suites feature an in-suite iPad, daily canapés and upgraded bathroom amenities.

Penthouse Suite (Category: A)

Category: A
Penthouse Suite includes Butler Service; 449 sq.ft.; 376 sq.ft.; Balcony: 73 sq.ft.

Penthouse Suite (Category: B)

Category: B
Penthouse Suite includes Butler Service; 449 sq.ft.; 376 sq.ft.; Balcony: 73 sq.ft.

Penthouse Suite (Category: C)

Category: C
449 sq.ft.; 376 sq.ft.; Balcony: 73 sq.ft.

Concierge Suite (Category: D)

Category: D
Deluxe suite; 301 sq.ft.; 252 sq.ft.; Balcony: 49 sq.ft.

Concierge Suite (Category: E)

Category: E
Deluxe suite; 301 sq.ft.; 252 sq.ft.; Balcony: 49 sq.ft.

Master Suite (Category: MS)

Category: MS
2 bedrooms; Master Suites include Butler Service; 2002 sq.ft.; 1204 sq.ft.; Balcony: 727 sq.ft.

Grand Suite (Category: GS)

Category: GS
Butler service; 987 sq.ft.; 903 sq.ft.; Balcony: 84 sq.ft.

Mariner Suite (Category: MN)

Category: MN
Mariner Suites include Butler Service; 739 sq.ft.; 650 sq.ft.; Balcony: 89 sq.ft.

Seven Seas Suite (Category: SS)

Category: SS
Seven Seas (forward) Suites include Butler Service; 602 sq.ft.; 505 sq.ft.; Balcony: 97 sq.ft.

Horizon View Suite (Category: HS)

Category: HS
Butler service; 627 sq.ft.; 359 sq.ft.; Balcony: 268 sq.ft.

Deck Plan

Cruise Ship
Deck 12
Key to Symbols
SymbolDescription
Three guest capacity suite; convertible sofa bedThree guest capacity suite; convertible sofa bed
Wheelchair accessible suites have shower stall instead of bathtubWheelchair accessible suites have shower stall instead of bathtub
Bathroom features a glass-enclosed shower instead of a bathtubBathroom features a glass-enclosed shower instead of a bathtub
2-bedroom suite accommodates up to 6 guests2-bedroom suite accommodates up to 6 guests

Ship Facts

Seven Seas Mariner ship image
  • Ship Name: Seven Seas Mariner
  • Year Built: 2001
  • Year Refurbished: 2018
  • Year Entered Present Fleet: 2001
  • Ship Class: Mariner
  • Maximum Capacity: 700
  • Number of Passenger Decks: 8
  • Number of Crew: 445
  • Officers' Nationality: International
  • Tonnage (GRT): 48,075
  • Capacity Based on Double Occupancy: 700
  • Country of Registry: The Bahamas
  • Total Staterooms: 350
  • Suites with Balcony: 350
  • Crew/Hotel Staff Nationality: European/International
Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the hotel, resort or cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the provider without notice. Hotels, resorts, ships or accommodations designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Reviews

Available Dates & Prices

Departure Date

Inside Stateroom

Ocean View Stateroom

Balcony Stateroom

Suite Stateroom

Departure Date - 06/02/2024

Inside Stateroom

N/A

Ocean View Stateroom

N/A

Balcony Stateroom

$63,299

Suite Stateroom

$67,799

Terms & Conditions

*Price shown is per person based on double occupancy, is valid for select stateroom categories only, and does include government taxes/fees and gratuities. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for details.

**Select complimentary shore excursions are for full-fare guests only, capacity controlled and subject to availability. Shore excursion reservations are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. Please note, available excursions vary by sailing date and day of the week. Government fees and taxes are included. Requested excursions may not be available at time of booking. Supplement will apply on Regent Choice excursions and excludes Private Arrangements and all Adventures Ashore programs. Restrictions apply and penalties apply 36 hours prior to shore excursion start date.

††All shipboard credit is in U.S. dollars, is per stateroom based on double occupancy, has no cash value, is nontransferable and not redeemable for cash.

†The exact amount of the Costco Shop Card will be calculated during the booking process. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for additional information.

Ship's registry: The Bahamas

    Package ID: RSSMARWOR20240602