Europe and Mediterranean: Italy Intensive Voyage

Azamara

Azamara Onward makes it easy to experience a single country's iconic destinations as well as its hidden gems — especially with longer stays and more overnights at ports. And because you'll be sailing aboard a boutique hotel at sea, you'll enjoy exclusive access to ports only available to smaller ships. Whether you're craving a transformational experience or simply wish to acquire a fresh perspective, we welcome you to embrace endless possibilities aboard the new Azamara Onward.

Included Extras

  • AzAmazing Evenings® event (on most voyages of seven nights or longer)

  • Select standard spirits, international beers and wines

  • Bottled water, soft drinks, specialty coffees and teas

  • Self-service laundry

  • Shuttle service to and from port communities where available

  • Concierge services for personal guidance and reservations

  • Gratuities

Executive Member Benefit

  • Executive Members earn an annual 2% Reward on Costco Travel purchases

Costco Shop Card

  • Member Exclusive: Costco Shop Card with every Azamara sailing†

Sailing Itinerary

Note: Cruise itineraries are subject to change. Please verify ports and times directly with the cruise line.

Day 1Port of Call Monte CarloDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

With more than 300 days a year of sunshine, residents in Monaco can take advantage of the Mediterranean, and all of its seaside activities. Moreover, Monaco's close proximitiy to the Southern Alps, which are only 1 hour away by car, allows for easy access to the ski slopes.

Day 2Port of Call La Spezia Arrival 8:00amDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

La Spezia is a port city in Liguria, Italy. Its 1800s maritime arsenal and the Technical Naval Museum, with ship models and navigational instruments, attest to the city’s seafaring heritage. The hilltop St. George’s Castle houses an archaeological museum with artifacts from prehistory to the Middle Ages. The nearby Amedeo Lia Museum exhibits paintings, bronze sculptures and illuminated miniatures in a former convent.

Day 3Port of Call Livorno Arrival 8:00am

Overview

Livorno is situated along the coast of the Ligurian Sea, is one of Italy’s most important ports, both as a commercial and touristic port of call, an industrial centre of national importance and, among all of the Tuscan cities, it is generally considered the youngest, even though its territory holds historical testimonies of remote times that have survived the mass bombings of the Second War World. The city, developed from the end of the XVI century upon request of the Medici family, is famous for being the birthplace of prestigious personalities such as Amedeo Modigliani, Pietro Mascagni and Carlo Azeglio Ciampi. In the past, until the first years of the 20th century it was also a tourist destination of international importance for the presence of important seaside and thermal establishments, that give the city its the name of Montecatini-on-the-sea. Livorno, which at the end of the XIX century counted around 100,000 inhabitants and was the 11th most populated city in Italy and the 2nd in Tuscany, in the last decades has had a notable decline in the number of inhabitants and now is the 3rd most populated city in Tuscany after Florence and Prato.

Day 4Port of Call LivornoDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

Livorno is situated along the coast of the Ligurian Sea, is one of Italy’s most important ports, both as a commercial and touristic port of call, an industrial centre of national importance and, among all of the Tuscan cities, it is generally considered the youngest, even though its territory holds historical testimonies of remote times that have survived the mass bombings of the Second War World. The city, developed from the end of the XVI century upon request of the Medici family, is famous for being the birthplace of prestigious personalities such as Amedeo Modigliani, Pietro Mascagni and Carlo Azeglio Ciampi. In the past, until the first years of the 20th century it was also a tourist destination of international importance for the presence of important seaside and thermal establishments, that give the city its the name of Montecatini-on-the-sea. Livorno, which at the end of the XIX century counted around 100,000 inhabitants and was the 11th most populated city in Italy and the 2nd in Tuscany, in the last decades has had a notable decline in the number of inhabitants and now is the 3rd most populated city in Tuscany after Florence and Prato.

Day 5Port of Call Portoferraio Arrival 8:00amDeparture 2:00pm

Overview

Portofino is a fishing village on the Italian Riviera coastline, southeast of Genoa city. Pastel-colored houses, high-end boutiques and seafood restaurants fringe its Piazzetta, a small cobbled square overlooking the harbor, which is lined with super-yachts. A path leads from the Piazzetta to Castello Brown, a 16th-century fortress and museum with art exhibitions and panoramic views of the town and the Ligurian Sea.

Day 6Port of Call Naples Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Naples, a city in southern Italy, sits on the Bay of Naples. Nearby is Mount Vesuvius, the still-active volcano that destroyed nearby Roman town Pompeii. Dating to the 2nd millennium B.C., Naples has centuries of important art and architecture. The city's cathedral, the Duomo di San Gennaro, is filled with frescoes. Other major landmarks include the lavish Royal Palace and Castel Nuovo, a 13th-century castle.

Day 7Port of Call Rome/Civitavecchia Arrival 8:00am

Overview

Located about 80 kilometers northwest of Rome, the Port of Civitavecchia is the port of Rome and a busy ferry and cargo port serving Italy and southern Europe. Lying on Italy’s eastern shores on the Tyrrhenian Sea, the Port of Civitavecchia has excellent direct connections to Rome. It is an important cruise and ferry port with regular passage to Sardinia, Malta, Sicily, Tunis, and Barcelona. Fishing is of secondary importance to the Port of Civitavecchia. In addition to ocean-going traffic, the Port of Civitavecchia also contains a thermoelectric center and metallurgical works. In 2006, over 51 thousand people called the Port of Civitavecchia home. The Port of Civitavecchia was built on an earlier Etruscan settlement. Emperor Trajan founded the Port of Civitavecchia in the early 2nd Century, calling it Centumcellae. Today, Trajan’s Port is preserved within today’s Port of Civitavecchia. A busy growing town during the late Roman era, the Port of Civitavecchia was attacked by Vandals and then destroyed by the Saracens in 828 AD. Residents escaped to the nearby Allumiere Mountains where Pope Leo IV built a walled town in 854. Eventually, the people returned to Civitavecchia (the name means “old city”). At the end of the 15th Century, the Port of Civitavecchia was under frequent attack by pirates. The naval arsenal was constructed in 1508. Pope Paul III commissioned the building of the keep, which was designed by Donato Bramante and then finished by Michelangelo in 1537, to protect the Port of Civitavecchia from the pirate attacks. In 1696, Civitavecchia became a free port under Pope Innocent XII. Because it was Rome’s main port, the French occupied the Port of Civitavecchia in 1849. The Port of Civitavecchia was linked to Rome by the Rome and Civitavecchia Rail Road in 1859. When the Port of Civitavecchia became part of the Kingdom of Italy in 1870, it was one of the Papal State’s most strongly-fortified towns when Papal troops welcomed General Nino Bixio on behalf of the Italian unification forces into the Port of Civitavecchia fortress. World War II brought destruction to as much as three-quarters of the Port of Civitavecchia. Reconstruction enlarged the Port of Civitavecchia beyond its pre-war area. The Autorita Portuale Civitavecchia (Port of Rome) is responsible for managing and operating the Port of Civitavecchia as well as the ports of Fiumicino and Gaeta. The modern Port of Civitavecchia is at the center of rail, road, and air networks that link it with central Italy and the world. The Port of Civitavecchia has capacity to handle about 11 million tons of cargo per year and over 1.5 million passengers. Cargoes include forest products, cereals, iron and steel, chemicals, automobiles, containers, and liquid bulk. In 2007, the Port of Civitavecchia welcomed 856 cruise vessels carrying 1.6 million passengers, and the total number of passengers using ferries and cruise vessels was 3.8 million. In 2007, the Port of Civitavecchia handled a total of 7.7 million tons of cargo. This total included 1.5 million tons of liquid bulk, 1.7 million tons of solid bulk, 4.6 million tons of packages, and 31.1 thousand TEUs of containerized cargo. The Port of Civitavecchia contains 28 berths of a total 5.6 thousand meters in length with alongside depths from 6 to 18 meters. Port properties include five warehouses containing 36 thousand square meters for handling and storing cargoes. The intermodal terminal includes seven thousand square meters of storage space and 12.5 thousand square meters for loading/unloading rail cars and parking. The Port of Civitavecchia is one of the busiest ferry ports in the world. Just 80 kilometers northwest of Rome, it is the main tourist destination for people traveling to the Eternal City. It is also a central port for ferries carrying passengers to more local destinations. The ferry terminal offers a complete line of amenities. Different ferry companies offer services to the various destinations. Moby Lines handles crossings to Olbia, Sardinia. Corsica Sardinia Ferries runs services to Golfo Aranci. Grimaldi Ferries carries passengers to Barcelona and Tunis, and Grand Navi Veloci operates a route to Tunis. Ferrovie dello Stato operates a combined rail-ferry service to Golfo Aranci.

Day 8Rome/Civitavecchia

Overview

Located about 80 kilometers northwest of Rome, the Port of Civitavecchia is the port of Rome and a busy ferry and cargo port serving Italy and southern Europe. Lying on Italy’s eastern shores on the Tyrrhenian Sea, the Port of Civitavecchia has excellent direct connections to Rome. It is an important cruise and ferry port with regular passage to Sardinia, Malta, Sicily, Tunis, and Barcelona. Fishing is of secondary importance to the Port of Civitavecchia. In addition to ocean-going traffic, the Port of Civitavecchia also contains a thermoelectric center and metallurgical works. In 2006, over 51 thousand people called the Port of Civitavecchia home. The Port of Civitavecchia was built on an earlier Etruscan settlement. Emperor Trajan founded the Port of Civitavecchia in the early 2nd Century, calling it Centumcellae. Today, Trajan’s Port is preserved within today’s Port of Civitavecchia. A busy growing town during the late Roman era, the Port of Civitavecchia was attacked by Vandals and then destroyed by the Saracens in 828 AD. Residents escaped to the nearby Allumiere Mountains where Pope Leo IV built a walled town in 854. Eventually, the people returned to Civitavecchia (the name means “old city”). At the end of the 15th Century, the Port of Civitavecchia was under frequent attack by pirates. The naval arsenal was constructed in 1508. Pope Paul III commissioned the building of the keep, which was designed by Donato Bramante and then finished by Michelangelo in 1537, to protect the Port of Civitavecchia from the pirate attacks. In 1696, Civitavecchia became a free port under Pope Innocent XII. Because it was Rome’s main port, the French occupied the Port of Civitavecchia in 1849. The Port of Civitavecchia was linked to Rome by the Rome and Civitavecchia Rail Road in 1859. When the Port of Civitavecchia became part of the Kingdom of Italy in 1870, it was one of the Papal State’s most strongly-fortified towns when Papal troops welcomed General Nino Bixio on behalf of the Italian unification forces into the Port of Civitavecchia fortress. World War II brought destruction to as much as three-quarters of the Port of Civitavecchia. Reconstruction enlarged the Port of Civitavecchia beyond its pre-war area. The Autorita Portuale Civitavecchia (Port of Rome) is responsible for managing and operating the Port of Civitavecchia as well as the ports of Fiumicino and Gaeta. The modern Port of Civitavecchia is at the center of rail, road, and air networks that link it with central Italy and the world. The Port of Civitavecchia has capacity to handle about 11 million tons of cargo per year and over 1.5 million passengers. Cargoes include forest products, cereals, iron and steel, chemicals, automobiles, containers, and liquid bulk. In 2007, the Port of Civitavecchia welcomed 856 cruise vessels carrying 1.6 million passengers, and the total number of passengers using ferries and cruise vessels was 3.8 million. In 2007, the Port of Civitavecchia handled a total of 7.7 million tons of cargo. This total included 1.5 million tons of liquid bulk, 1.7 million tons of solid bulk, 4.6 million tons of packages, and 31.1 thousand TEUs of containerized cargo. The Port of Civitavecchia contains 28 berths of a total 5.6 thousand meters in length with alongside depths from 6 to 18 meters. Port properties include five warehouses containing 36 thousand square meters for handling and storing cargoes. The intermodal terminal includes seven thousand square meters of storage space and 12.5 thousand square meters for loading/unloading rail cars and parking. The Port of Civitavecchia is one of the busiest ferry ports in the world. Just 80 kilometers northwest of Rome, it is the main tourist destination for people traveling to the Eternal City. It is also a central port for ferries carrying passengers to more local destinations. The ferry terminal offers a complete line of amenities. Different ferry companies offer services to the various destinations. Moby Lines handles crossings to Olbia, Sardinia. Corsica Sardinia Ferries runs services to Golfo Aranci. Grimaldi Ferries carries passengers to Barcelona and Tunis, and Grand Navi Veloci operates a route to Tunis. Ferrovie dello Stato operates a combined rail-ferry service to Golfo Aranci.

Onboard the Azamara Onward

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Boutique hotels at sea that are not too big or too small. They are perfectly sized to cross oceans, sail into intimate rivers and dock in locations where larger ships can't reach.

Onboard Activities

Activities & Services (included in cruise)

Pool - Outdoor

  • Card Room
  • Casino
  • Theater/Show Lounge
  • Fitness Center
  • Sauna/Steam Room
  • Pool - Outdoor
  • Whirlpool/Jacuzzi
  • Bars/Lounges
  • Business Center
  • Concierge Desk
  • Duty-Free Shops/Boutiques
  • Elevators
  • Safe Deposit Boxes
  • Self-Service Laundromat

Activities & Services (available for an extra fee)

Full-Service Spa

  • Beauty Salon
  • Fitness Classes
  • Full-Service Spa
  • Internet Center
  • Dry Cleaning/ Laundry Service
  • Infirmary/Medical Center

Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the cruise line without notice. Staterooms designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Dining

Discoveries

Main Dining

Discoveries Restaurant (open seating): Discover the world through dishes and flavors from the places you visit. Whether it's a Destination Immersion dinner buffet or the Destination Immersion cuisine on the dinner menu, give your dining a little local flavor and enjoy on shore tastes onboard! You will also enjoy a wide variety of nightly selections such as filet mignon with black truffle sauce. With its elegant yet lively dining and renewed décor, it's easy to see why this restaurant is the culinary heart of the ship. Reservations are not accepted. It offers an elegant yet lively dining scene with a rotating menu inspired by the destinations on your voyage.

Prime C

Specialty Dining

Aqualina: At Aqualina, you'll find some of Italy's most celebrated dishes as well as contemporary inventive cuisine. Start with lobster ravioli, followed by arugula and radicchio with prosciutto chips, and a Venetian seafood platter. You won't be able to say no to these famous desserts: marsala custard, lemon soufflé, or tiramisu. The chefs love to be inspired, so after an on shore visit to a local market, you can also expect a delectable dish so local, you'll feel like you're not onboard anymore.

Prime C: At Prime C, you're in for more than an array of delectable dining such as steaks cooked to perfection, crab cakes with remoulade, lobster bisque, lamb, game hens and seafood. Last but certainly not least, try the mini cinnamon-sugar donuts with dipping sauces for dessert. Expect a marvelous evening in a warm wood-paneled ambiance with stunning views and lush décor. If the chef has made a visit to a local market while in port, you'll also have an authentic local dish to look forward to.

Specialty Dining: Specialty dining is complimentary for suite guests. For others, there is a $30 per-person cover. Reservations are highly recommended. Due to the popularity of our specialty restaurants and regard for your fellow guests, a $15 late cancellation fee will be charged to your guest folio if a booking is not canceled by noon on the day of your reservation.

Windows Café

Casual Dining

The Patio and Swirl & Top: Casual "pool grill" by day, then fine tablecloths and flickering candles will set the mood for a sit-down al fresco dining experience by night. Taste your way around the world with exclusive personalized dishes using local flavors of the places visited on the Destination Immersion® cuisine dinner menu served by professional wait staff. And for a little touch of whimsy, a self-serve frozen yogurt station—Swirl & Top. With a variety of flavors and your choice of toppings, it's the perfect way to cool off during the day or end your evening meal.

Windows Café: The best way to see where you are in the world is not by looking at your itinerary. It's by checking out the menu at Windows Café! Our daily themed dinner often takes its inspiration from the region we're visiting—Indian, Mexican, Spanish, Italian. We also create an extra live station made from local ingredients purchased in port: Greek salad made with local feta (Greece), pasta prepared with local mushrooms (Italy), fresh Mussels served with garlic bread (Netherlands). Take in the fresh breeze at an outdoor table and relax in the easy and casual atmosphere of the newly renovated Windows Café. Enjoy an intimate breakfast, lunch, or dinner for two or a lively meal for six with our flexible seating options. And speaking of choices, selections change daily. Choose from fresh sushi, stir-fry and pasta, salads, smoked lox and other cold fish, a carving station and of course, desserts.

Mosaic Café and Mosaic @ Night: Comfortable and stylish, Mosaic is the place where you'll find your favorite coffee drinks, just the way you like (for an additional fee). Slip into a comfortable seat and sip for a while. The perfect place to start (or end) your day, no matter where you are in the world. This just might become your favorite area on the ship.

Room Service: Room service is available 24-hours a day. Order from the full breakfast menu between 6:30 AM and 10:00 AM, and have it delivered at your appointed time. Lunch and dinner room service features a menu of hearty soups, fresh salads, gourmet sandwiches, pizzas and desserts.


Times, costs and other specifics are outside the control of Costco Travel. All information is at the sole discretion of the cruise line and is subject to change without notice. Dining time and table size preferences are submitted to the cruise line on a first-come, first-served request basis and are confirmed aboard ship. Questions, concerns and/or special needs regarding dining arrangements must be addressed with the maitre d' hotel aboard ship. Every effort is made to accommodate travelers' preferences; however, Costco Travel cannot guarantee dining arrangements. In specialty restaurants, space is limited and reservations are recommended. A cover charge and dress code may apply.

Staterooms

Club Interior Stateroom (Category: 12)

Category: 12

Club Interior Stateroom (Category: 11)

Category: 11

Club Interior Stateroom (Category: 10)

Category: 10

Club Interior Stateroom (Category: 09)

Category: 09

Club Oceanview Stateroom (obstructed view) (Category: 08)

Category: 08

Club Oceanview Stateroom (Category: 06)

Category: 06

Club Oceanview Stateroom (Category: 05)

Category: 05

Club Oceanview Stateroom (Category: 04)

Category: 04

Club Veranda Stateroom (Category: V3)

Category: V3

Club Veranda Stateroom (Category: V2)

Category: V2

Club Veranda Stateroom (Category: V1)

Category: V1

Club Veranda Plus Stateroom (Category: P3)

Category: P3

Club Veranda Plus Stateroom (Category: P2)

Category: P2

Club Veranda Plus Stateroom (Category: P1)

Category: P1

Club Continent Suite (Category: N2)

Category: N2

Club Continent Suite (Category: N1)

Category: N1

Club Spa Suite (Category: SP)

Category: SP

Club Ocean Suite (Category: CO)

Category: CO

Club World Owner’s Suite (Category: CW)

Category: CW

Deck Plan

Cruise Ship
Deck 11
Key to Symbols
SymbolDescription
Wheelchair-Accessible StateroomWheelchair-Accessible Stateroom
Convertible Sofa BedConvertible Sofa Bed
Connecting StateroomsConnecting Staterooms
Interior Stateroom Door LocationInterior Stateroom Door Location
Smoking AreaSmoking Area
Suite with tubSuite with tub

Ship Facts

Azamara Onward ship image
  • Ship Name: Azamara Onward
  • Year Built: 1999
  • Year Refurbished: 2022
  • Year Entered Present Fleet: 2021
  • Ship Class: OceanLiner
  • Maximum Capacity: 692
  • Number of Passenger Decks: 8
  • Number of Crew: 408
  • Officers' Nationality: International
  • Ocean-View without Balcony: 79
  • Ocean-View with Balcony: 175
  • Total Inside Staterooms: 26
  • Tonnage (GRT): 30,277
  • Capacity Based on Double Occupancy: 692
  • Country of Registry: Malta
  • Total Staterooms: 346
  • Suites with Balcony: 66
  • Crew/Hotel Staff Nationality: International
Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the hotel, resort or cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the provider without notice. Hotels, resorts, ships or accommodations designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Available Dates & Prices

Departure Date

Inside Stateroom

Ocean View Stateroom

Balcony Stateroom

Suite Stateroom

Terms & Conditions

*Price shown is per person based on double occupancy and is valid for select stateroom categories only. Click on Terms & Conditions link below for details.

†The exact amount of the Costco Shop Card will be calculated during the booking process. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for additional information.

Ship's Registry: Malta

    Package ID: AZAONWEUR20221105