World Cruise: 2022 World Voyage Cruise

Cunard

Explore more than 30 iconic ports round the world with Queen Victoria®, including Sydney. With a heart full of awe-inspiring landscapes, look ahead to the exotic Far East, and African adventure.

Included Extras

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Costco Shop Card

  • Member Exclusive: Costco Shop Card with every Cunard sailing†

Sailing Itinerary

Note: Cruise itineraries are subject to change. Please verify ports and times directly with the cruise line.

Day 1Port of Call SouthamptonDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Southampton is a port city on England’s south coast. It’s home to the SeaCity Museum, with an interactive model of the Titanic, which departed from Southampton in 1912. Nearby, Southampton City Art Gallery specialises in modern British art. Solent Sky Museum features vintage aircraft like the iconic Spitfire. Tudor House & Garden displays artifacts covering over 800 years of history, including a penny-farthing bike.

Day 2 Cruising
Day 3 Cruising
Day 4 Cruising
Day 5 Cruising
Day 6 Cruising
Day 7 Cruising
Day 8Port of Call Hamilton Arrival 9:00amDeparture 4:00pm

Overview

Hamilton is the capital city of Bermuda, a British island territory in the North Atlantic. Along the harbour, Front Street features pastel-coloured colonial buildings and high-end shops. The stone Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity has a tower with city views. The Bermuda Underwater Exploration Institute offers ocean discovery exhibits. Northeast is the Bermuda Aquarium, Museum and Zoo, home to sharks and turtles.

Day 9 Cruising
Day 10 Cruising
Day 11Port of Call Port Canaveral Arrival 6:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

You don't have to be a rocket scientist to find Port Canaveral thrilling. This is the home of the Kennedy Space Center, where you can catch a fascinating glimpse into the history - and future - of the U.S. space program. Or, take a leisurely stroll along the Cocoa Beach Pier; the shopping is great and the beach views are truly "out of this world."

Day 12Port of Call Fort Lauderdale Arrival 6:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Ft Lauderdale is a city of islands held together by an intricate web of canals, rivers, bays and waterways hundreds of miles long. Needless to say, boating is a favorite city pastime, whether zooming along on a speedboat, enjoying a fishing charter, or cruising the coastline by yacht. Beautiful homes of every size and style make up the bulk of this primarily residential area. By the beach, a leisurly stroll can be taken along the new landscaping wavewall design of the beachfront promenade. But this city is anything but sedate. Once a spring break hot spot, the town still has an energetic and colorful nightlife. Nearby, charming Laudrdale-By-the-Sea is home to one of the only living coral reefs in the US accesible from shore. Las Olas Boulevard, a shoppers paradise, is the chic new shopping and trendy dining area of downtown. If sports are more your inclination, dozens of golf courses and hundreds of public parks allow you to absorb the great Florida outdoors. Cultural arts are also popular. Water taxis bring theater-goers from throughout the city to the Performing Arts Center on the water.

Day 13 Cruising
Day 14 Cruising
Day 15 Cruising
Day 16Port of Call Aruba Arrival 7:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Aruba's path to the present day is marked by the mystery of ochre-colored rock drawings left behind by island shamans, the enterprising spirit of European adventurers and settlers and the diverse experiences and traditions brought by the many nationalities that have since sought out the island as either a new home or temporary resting place. The look of the people, the languages they speak and the innate hospitality that manifests itself in the Aruban psyche is the result of a multi-cultural mix that reflects a rich past.

Day 17 Cruising
Day 18Port of Call Panama Canal Arrival 7:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

The Panama Canal is an artificial 48-mile waterway in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean with the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a key conduit for international maritime trade. The Canal uses a system of locks -compartments with entrance and exit gates. The locks function as water lifts: they raise ships from sea level (the Pacific or the Atlantic) to the level of Gatun Lake (26 meters above sea level); ships then sail the channel through the Continental Divide. Each set of locks bears the name of the townsite where it was built: Gatun (on the Atlantic side), and Pedro Miguel and Miraflores (on the Pacific side). The lock chambers -steps-- are 33.53 meters wide by 304.8 meters long. The maximum dimensions of ships that can transit the Canal are: 32.3 meters in beam; draft -their depth reach- 12 meters in Tropical Fresh Water; and 294.1 meters long (depending on the type of ship). The water used to raise and lower vessels in each set of locks comes from Gatun Lake by gravity; it comes into the locks through a system of main culverts that extend under the lock chambers from the sidewalls and the center wall. The narrowest portion of the Canal is Culebra Cut, which extends from the north end of Pedro Miguel Locks to the south edge of Gatun Lake at Gamboa. This segment, approximately 13.7 kilometers long, is carved through the rock and shale of the Continental Divide. Ships from all parts of the world transit daily through the Panama Canal. Some 13 to 14 thousand vessels use the Canal every year. In fact, commercial transportation activities through the Canal represent approximately 5% of the world trade. The Canal has a work force of approximately 9 thousand employees and operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, providing transit service to vessels of all nations without discrimination.

Day 19 Cruising
Day 20Port of Call Puntarenas/Costa Rica Arrival 6:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

The Central Pacific's largest city, Puntarenas sits on a long, narrow peninsula in the Gulf of Nicoya. For years, it was the country's principal port, and although a newer port in nearby Caldera now handles cargo and Puntarenas the cruise ships, a large fishing fleet still anchors in the estuary behind town. Being the country's most important fishing port, Puntarenas is the perfect place to enjoy fresh seafood, be it camarones al ajillo (shrimp scampi), pescado entero (a whole fried fish), or ceviche de corvina (bits of fresh fish marinate in lime juice with onions, peppers and spices).

Day 21 Cruising
Day 22 Cruising
Day 23 Cruising
Day 24Port of Call Cabo San Lucas Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Cabo San Lucas, where the sea, sun and desert join to cast an air of mystery and romance over all who visit. Cabo was once a tranquil fishing village and, in times long ago, a hangout for pirates. Although no longer the fishing village of old, and not many of the old pirates are seen around town any more, the magic of Cabo remains. Cabo is still small and charming by any standards, with a population of under 30,000. We do have 4 stop lights now. And with the number of activities available to the visitor, you could easily imagine you are in a giant amusement park. Cabo has come of age. Located at the southernmost tip of the magnificent Baja peninsula, Cabo has been blessed with what many describe as the perfect climate. Average year-round temperature is 78 degrees, it is a little cooler in the winter and a bit warmer in the summer. For years Cabo was the remote playground reserved solely for private yacht owners. They flocked here to be near "Marlin Alley", as the waters around Cabo have often been described. The name is well deserved, as Cabo San Lucas is the undisputed billfish capital of the world. But Cabo is far from remote these days, and the attraction of this magical spot is no longer limited to marlin fishing. Cabo can be, many different things to people. Cabo San Lucas has become known as a perfect vacation spot for the entire family. Cabo can be as quiet, romantic and relaxing as any secret hideaway. It can also be as lively as anyone can possibly imagine. If your wish is to enjoy a quiet candlelight dinner, "muy romantico", beside the shimmering sea for just the two of you, we have some of the most romantic dining spots on the face of the earth. If golf, water sports, boating, fishing, ATV's, horseback riding and numerous other activities are what you seek, they're all here, waiting for you. If "party till you drop" is the mood of the evening, Cabo has got it for you, big time!

Day 25 Cruising
Day 26 Cruising
Day 27Port of Call San Francisco Arrival 6:00am

Overview

San Francisco is a golden dream come true, a place where heart, mind and soul embrace, lost in the simplicity of delightful deliverance. Fog and sun mingle playfully above America's favorite city; the cool, cloudy comfort of early morning slowly dissolving into the peaceful warmth of a gentle afternoon glow. Touch it....it is real. Feel it.....it is the essence of escape. Savor it.....it is one of a kind. Little wonder why San Francisco has been named the world's top city twice by readers of Condé Nast Traveler; the top U.S. city seven times since 1988. San Francisco's neighborhoods comprise its inner beauty, enhancing daydreams, opening doors to new and exciting visions. The City is a cultural wonderland, an ethnic treasure chest where custom, tradition and history are preserved, celebrated, shared. So take your time and explore The City. You'll find that the Gold Rush days have never really ended here; there's still plenty of gold to be found. The restless spirit of The City's Barbary Coast past lives on, fueled by a desire to be different, nurtured by infinite viewpoints, personalities, styles. Magical moments abound. The echo of cable car bells from atop great hills. The rejuvenation of the soul upon crossing the Golden Gate Bridge. The splendor and elegance of a boat cruise on San Francisco Bay. The soft touching of wine glasses over a gourmet meal. The views. The people. The sights. The sounds. The City. So come and share the wealth. Let your heart, mind and soul wander. Stay as long as you like. San Francisco encourages lingering. It was designed with adventure, romance and pleasure in mind. It is one of life's great indulgences, so indulge. It is one of the world's most gratifying escapes, so escape. It is where the world comes to unwind. It is America's preeminent playground.

Day 28Port of Call San FranciscoDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

San Francisco is a golden dream come true, a place where heart, mind and soul embrace, lost in the simplicity of delightful deliverance. Fog and sun mingle playfully above America's favorite city; the cool, cloudy comfort of early morning slowly dissolving into the peaceful warmth of a gentle afternoon glow. Touch it....it is real. Feel it.....it is the essence of escape. Savor it.....it is one of a kind. Little wonder why San Francisco has been named the world's top city twice by readers of Condé Nast Traveler; the top U.S. city seven times since 1988. San Francisco's neighborhoods comprise its inner beauty, enhancing daydreams, opening doors to new and exciting visions. The City is a cultural wonderland, an ethnic treasure chest where custom, tradition and history are preserved, celebrated, shared. So take your time and explore The City. You'll find that the Gold Rush days have never really ended here; there's still plenty of gold to be found. The restless spirit of The City's Barbary Coast past lives on, fueled by a desire to be different, nurtured by infinite viewpoints, personalities, styles. Magical moments abound. The echo of cable car bells from atop great hills. The rejuvenation of the soul upon crossing the Golden Gate Bridge. The splendor and elegance of a boat cruise on San Francisco Bay. The soft touching of wine glasses over a gourmet meal. The views. The people. The sights. The sounds. The City. So come and share the wealth. Let your heart, mind and soul wander. Stay as long as you like. San Francisco encourages lingering. It was designed with adventure, romance and pleasure in mind. It is one of life's great indulgences, so indulge. It is one of the world's most gratifying escapes, so escape. It is where the world comes to unwind. It is America's preeminent playground.

Day 29 Cruising
Day 30 Cruising
Day 31 Cruising
Day 32 Cruising
Day 33Port of Call Honolulu Arrival 8:00amDeparture 11:59pm

Overview

Anyone lucky enough to be going to Honolulu doesn't have to give a reason for going. They can just say, "We're going to Honolulu," and imagination will take care of the rest. Moreover, Honolulu can probably live up to and even surpass whatever we imagine. World-famous beaches and tropical weather set the scene for an amazing mix of Pacific cultures in this Hawaiian capital. There is a reason why Hawaii is consistently rated as one of the nation's top travel destinations; in fact, there are several of them. Waikiki Beach is the center of activity for Hawaii's biggest industry: tourism. This is one of the world's greatest resort playgrounds, featuring some of the most beautiful beaches and hotels in the world. Visitors from all over the world flock here to enjoy the sun, the sand and the incredible nightlife. Besides the beaches, visitors to Honolulu can take tours of the countryside surrounding the downtown area. These tours are amazing, bringing visitors to some of the most beautiful rainforests and volcanoes in the world. Animal and plant life are abundant, and the scenery is unsurpassed. A five-minute car ride from Honolulu brings visitors into some of Nature's most beautiful and awe-inspiring sights. Several museums, including the Bishop Museum, combine exhibits on Hawaiian natural history with lessons about history and culture of its many diverse peoples. The Waikiki Aquarium is the third oldest public aquarium in the United States, and it features many of Hawaii's most interesting sea animals. The Honolulu Zoo also features some of the unique mammals, birds, and reptiles that inhabit the forests just outside of the city. The history of Hawaii is very rich, as the islands have always attracted many different people. Visitors can tour the Iolani Palace, the residence of the last of the Hawaiian monarchs. They can also visit Honolulu's Chinatown, which is more authentic than many of its mainland counterparts. They can also visit the Arizona Memorial, commemorating the destruction of the battleship Arizona during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor that brought America into World War II. Honolulu exhibits the best of Hawaii in every way. From its famous beaches to its incredible natural preserves, this town has attracted millions of people from around the world. Many of those visitors stayed, helping to make Hawaii one of the most cosmopolitan and diverse places to visit in the United States. Anyone lucky enough to be going to Hawaii knows that he won't be disappointed.

Day 34 Cruising
Day 35 Cruising
Day 36 Crossing the International Dateline Arrival 11:30pmDeparture 11:59pm
Day 37 Cruising
Day 38 Cruising
Day 39Port of Call Apia Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Apia, town, port, and capital (since 1959) of Samoa. It is located on the northern coast of Upolu Island, in the South Pacific Ocean. The Apia Observatory, the legislative council chambers, and a broadcasting station are on the Mulinuu Peninsula, a promontory dividing Apia Harbour from Vaiusu Bay. The 19th-century Scottish writer Robert Louis Stevenson spent the last year of his life in Apia, and his home, Vailima, is now the residence of the head of state. Apia, town, port, and capital (since 1959) of Samoa. It is located on the northern coast of Upolu Island, in the South Pacific Ocean. The Apia Observatory, the legislative council chambers, and a broadcasting station are on the Mulinuu Peninsula, a promontory dividing Apia Harbour from Vaiusu Bay. The 19th-century Scottish writer Robert Louis Stevenson spent the last year of his life in Apia, and his home, Vailima, is now the residence of the head of state. Stevenson is buried at Mount Vaea, which rises to 1,500 feet (460 metres) on the town’s southern outskirts. The government holds title to the town land.is buried at Mount Vaea, which rises to 1,500 feet (460 metres) on the town’s southern outskirts. The government holds title to the town land.

Day 40 Cruising
Day 41Port of Call Suva/Fiji Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Almost any time of the year is an excellent time to visit Suva. There are so many things happening. Suva, the capital city of Fiji, the thumb of the Pacific, is the place of many happenings. For tourists, the day really begins at about 6pm. Before this, it's best to laze around a swimming pool with a cocktail or go walking or shopping around the city. Suva comes alive at night. This is when live local bands or the current overseas hit songs fill the air. Suva has about 25bars/nightclubs and all are walking distance from each other to make for an ideal pub-crawling night. Suva is a city of colors. While neon lights from the night clubs brighten the nights, the people of Suva brighten up the day. Suva is a city with rich and diverse cultures. It has a multiracial population mix comprised mainly Fijians, Indians, Europeans, Chinese and South Pacific Islanders. People are friendly and always willing to help with directions. So if you are lost, don't hesitate to ask. The locals will help with a smile. There are lots of things to do, see and buy. There are many churches, temples, mosques, bush-walks and gardens. Suva has a botanical garden at the eastern end of town. This is also where Fiji Museum is located. Next to these is the home of the President of the Republic of Fiji.

Day 42 Cruising
Day 43 Cruising
Day 44 Cruising
Day 45Port of Call Tauranga Arrival 8:15amDeparture 7:30pm

Overview

Tauranga is located at the western end of the Bay of Plenty, on the North Island’s central eastern coast. It is built around Tauranga Harbour, a busy port, and the surrounding region is a fertile fruit growing district. It is sheltered to the west by the Kaimai Ranges and to the east by Matakana Island.
Historically, Tauranga was a base for missionaries and for the flax trade. The city is also home to Gate Pa, the site of an historic battle between local Maori and European settlers. Artillery and earthworks can still be seen at the site. Today, Tauranga’s warm climate and coastal location makes the city a popular location to live, and it is the country’s fastest growing centre. Its major attractions are boating, surfing and fishing, and a host of other activities such as water skiing, diving and windsurfing. The city also has some interesting historical buildings and attractions, such as Tauranga Historic Village/Museum.
Nearby Mt Maunganui is built on a long sandy peninsula and can be reached by the harbour bridge or via the coast road. It is a popular resort with a long sandy beach and fine surfing. At the tip of the peninsula is Mt Maunganui itself. This bush clad hill has several walking tracks and excellent views of the area.

Day 46Port of Call Auckland Arrival 7:00amDeparture 9:00pm

Overview

Auckland is New Zealand's largest city, with a population of just under 382,000 within the city boundary and 1.18 million in the greater Auckland area. This represents about one third of the population of the whole country. The city and suburbs cover an area of 60 square kilometres, with many of the suburbs having their own unique character. The city is built on a narrow isthmus between two harbours, the Waitemata to the East and the Manukau to the West. Water sports are a pastime enjoyed by a large number of Aucklanders and the city enjoys the reputation as being known as the 'City of Sails' due the number of yachts which sail in the harbours and the adjoining Hauraki Gulf.

Day 47Port of Call Bay of Islands/New Zealand Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

The Bay of Islands is the finest Maritime Park in New Zealand with 144 islands, secluded bays and an abundance of marine life. It is the cradle of European civilisation in New Zealand and has fine examples of Maori culture for you to experience. The scenery is nothing short of spectacular and can only be fully appreciated by cruising through the area. The area is the warmest part of New Zealand. The Maritime Park is a natural wonderland with an abundance of wildlife including marlin, whales, penguins, dolphins, gannets and many other species. The towns of Paihia and picturesque Russell are perfect places to wander amongst the many shops and restaurants along the waterfront. There are endless activities too - fishing, forest and beach walks, all kinds of water sports and great golf courses. The Bay is the perfect base from which to explore further North. See the magnificent Kauri forests, Cape Reinga - the top of New Zealand, 90 Mile Beach and the craft shops of Kerikeri.

Day 48 Cruising
Day 49 Cruising
Day 50Port of Call Sydney/Australia Arrival 6:30am

Overview

Sydney is Australia's largest and most cosmopolitan city and is the capital of New South Wales, the most heavily populated state of Australia. Sydney is situated on one of the world's most beautiful and famous harbours. Sydney also boasts beautiful beaches, fantastic shops, restaurants, history and culture. Sydney's many highlights include the Harbour Bridge, the Opera House, Centrepoint Tower, The Rocks, the stunning harbour and the white sands of Bondi, Manly and beyond. Sydney is also home to beautiful National Parks, the Royal Botanic Gardens, many harbour front picnic locations and heritage areas.

Day 51Port of Call Sydney/AustraliaDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Sydney is Australia's largest and most cosmopolitan city and is the capital of New South Wales, the most heavily populated state of Australia. Sydney is situated on one of the world's most beautiful and famous harbours. Sydney also boasts beautiful beaches, fantastic shops, restaurants, history and culture. Sydney's many highlights include the Harbour Bridge, the Opera House, Centrepoint Tower, The Rocks, the stunning harbour and the white sands of Bondi, Manly and beyond. Sydney is also home to beautiful National Parks, the Royal Botanic Gardens, many harbour front picnic locations and heritage areas.

Day 52 Cruising
Day 53Port of Call Brisbane Arrival 7:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Brisbane, the capital city of Queensland, is midway up the east coast of Australia - 27.5oS, 153oE. With the Gold Coast to the south and the Sunshine Coast to the north, domestic and international airports, Brisbane is an ideal headquarters for an Australian holiday. Brisbane, indeed all Queensland, operates on Eastern Standard Time which is 10 hours ahead of GMT. Summertime or Daylight Saving is not observed. Residents and visitors to Brisbane enjoy a wide range of landscapes and lifestyles. The inner-city, metropolitan Brisbane is surrounded by leafy, sometimes very hilly, suburbs. Further out in the suburbs, the traditional Australian house on a large block or even acreage dominates. Moreton Bay and its islands provide water sports, sailing and sea-side suburbs. The Pacific Highway leads south to the Gold Coast and its well-known surf beaches. North is the seaside town of Redcliffe, the rainforest and picturesque countryside of Pine Rivers, Caboolture and the Glasshouse Mountains. Bribie Island offers the first surf beach to the north. The Sunshine Coast towns and hinterland are popular holiday spots. Travelling west of Brisbane, past Ipswich, you soon climb the Great Dividing Range to Toowoomba and the rich plains of the Darling Downs.

Day 54 Cruising
Day 55 Cruising
Day 56Port of Call Cairns Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

The far north of Queensland is nestled amongst the tropical background of Australia’s rare rain forests and internationally acclaimed Great Barrier Reef. Recognised for the charm and friendly hospitality of the local people, North Queensland has an array of holiday experiences and attractions to offer year round. Cairns Far North Queensland is the perfect escape for nature lovers with spectacular National Parks abundant with amazing bird and animal life. While the more adventurous can dive the Great Barrier Reef, raft the rapids of the Baron River or rappel down a ravine. Cairns situated on the coast is often described as the jewel of North Queensland. It is also the gateway to the magnificent natural attractions of the whole region extending from the northern most point of Queensland out to Gulf Savannah in the west and down to Townsville another major city of North Queensland not to be missed. These two cities offer the pinnacle of dining and nightlife with a unique North Queensland flavour. Cairns has been called paradise by many because of its location, beauty of the reef and spectacular scenery of the hinterland that surrounds this coastal city. In Cairns you will discover an amazing array of cultures. Charming seafront walking paths and the new fantastic Esplanade redevelopment project adds such character to this charming city. Restaurants, cafes, cosmopolitan shopping and activities are an everyday event in this bustling town. Only a short drive away you come to Cairns northern beaches which will delight anyone. This is the place to ride horses, sail, windsurf or relax under a palm tree and watch the colours of the sky change as the sun sets. The beaches are made up of Machans, Holloways, Yorkeys Knob, Trinity, Palm Cove and Ellis Beaches. Each is a small separate township with its own distinctive character. Together, the beachside towns provide much of Cairns accommodation. From the beaches to the mountains, a day trip up to Atherton Tablelands will be spectacular where you can canoe on freshwater lakes, shop in craft stores and view some of the majestic views across the mountains to the sea. The rainforests of the Wet Tropics have been described as a ‘living museum’ of flora and fauna and were placed on the World Heritage List in 1988. The Wet Tropics cover an area of almost 9000,000 hectares of rainforest and tropical vegetation. Previously unidentified species of birds, insects and mammals have been discovered from within these rainforests delighting biologists and nature lovers alike. The local history, culture and tropical lifestyle are to be truly envied and enjoyed when visiting North Queensland. There is a diverse mix of cultures and people that are proud to call this area home. The first inhabitants were the Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islanders who fished and hunted the abundant wildlife of the region, then came the Dutch navigators and Captain James Cook, who claimed the land for Britain and instrumented the settlement of European communities. The tropical climate encourages an outdoor lifestyle with the famous Queensland barbeque influencing cuisine in the tropics. Exotic fruits and spectacular seafood are also a normal way of eating when visiting or living in the North.

Day 57 Cruising
Day 58Port of Call Alotau Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Alotau is the capital of the Milne Bay Province in PNG. It is a very scenic town on the north shore of the actual bay named Milne Bay. The town of Alotau is located within the area in which the invading Japanese army suffered their first land defeat in the Pacific war in 1942, before the Kokoda Trail battle. A memorial park at the old battle site commemorates this historic fact. The Milne Bay people have a deserved reputation for being friendly, easy going and happy. The dangers warned against in other centres are still largely unknown. The lack of a road link out of the Province probably helps maintain this situation. Getting to Alotau is easy. There are daily flights on Qantas and Air Nuigini from many destinations to Port Moresby International Airport. From Port Moresby daily flights on Air Nuigini and MBA Airlines operate to Gurney airport near Alotau. The airport is located 12 km from town.

Day 59Port of Call Kiriwina Arrival 7:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Kiriwina is the largest of the Trobriand Islands, with an area of 290.5 km². It is part of the Milne Bay Province of Papua New Guinea. Most of the 12,000 people who live in the Trobriands live on Kiriwina.

Day 60Port of Call Rabaul Arrival 9:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Located on East New Britain Province, Rabaul lies on the rim of a volcanic caldera and has been likened to a lunar landscape. Rabaul was the scene of many fierce WW2 skirmishes and war wrecks litter the land and surrounding reef system. Following the volcanic eruptions of 1994, many wrecks in Rabaul Harbor were covered under tons of ash. This is now clearing in places and diving on some wrecks has resumed. Other wrecks outside the harbor are accessible and the reefs and surrounding islands have been untouched and offer fantastic diving.

Day 61 Cruising
Day 62 Cruising
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Day 66 Cruising
Day 67Port of Call Manila Arrival 6:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Manila, officially the City of Manila, is the capital of the Philippines and the most densely populated city proper in the world. The term "Manila" is commonly used to refer to the whole metropolitan area, the greater metropolitan area or the city proper. The officially defined metropolitan area called Metro Manila, the capital region of the Philippines, includes the much larger Quezon City and the Makati Central Business District. It is the most populous region of the country, one of the most populous urban areas in the world,and is one of the wealthiest regions in Southeast Asia.The city proper is home to 1,780,148 people in 2015,and is the historic core of a built-up area that extends well beyond its administrative limits. With 71,263 people per square kilometer, Manila is also the most densely populated city proper in the world. The city is located on the eastern shores of Manila Bay. The Pasig River flows through the middle of the city, dividing it into the north and south sections. Manila is made up of 16 administrative districts: Binondo, Ermita, Intramuros, Malate, Paco, Pandacan, Port Area, Quiapo, Sampaloc, San Andres, San Miguel, San Nicolas, Santa Ana, Santa Cruz, Santa Mesa and Tondo, while it is divided into six districts for its representation in Congress and the election of the city council members. In 2016, the Globalization and World Cities Research Network listed Manila as an "alpha –" global city.

Day 68 Cruising
Day 69Port of Call Hong Kong Arrival 7:00am

Overview

Hong Kong is a place of contrasts. Sleek, glassy skyscrapers shine above Old World markets where chicken feet and dried squid are displayed for sale. Archaic wooden boats bob past sleek cruise liners. Subway stations and expressway interchanges dot a landscape cluttered with Rolls Royces and rickshaws. Hong Kong Island was ceded to Britain in 1842 when those serving the British crown attacked the island. Though it was deeded back to China in 1997, Hong Kong enjoys a high degree of autonomy, especially in its economy and municipal government. Hong Kong is one of the most unique Chinese cities in the world. The 417-square mile island off the coast of China offers visitors a slice of authentic Chinese culture with all the amenities of home. A modern metropolis teeming with eastern and western influences, Hong Kong is the world's third-largest financial center, the so-called “Wall Street of Asia,” and a shopping gold mine. Shopping? Yes indeed. Hong Kong is a duty-free port and the world's leading exporter of toys, garments, watches, and electronics. As a result, the vast majority of the 10 million annual visitors come with an empty suitcase that they fill up after visiting the malls, street bazaars (Stanley Market is world famous), textile and tailor shops, and jade and electronic stores. Those willing to look beyond the bargain-basement prices will find that Hong Kong is more than the world’s largest department store – it’s a cultural Mecca with wining and dining, museums, and historic attractions. Be sure to ride the world famous Star Ferry across the harbor to Hong Kong Island, admire the mansions on Repulse Bay, drop in to see the temples on Cat Street, visit the fishing boats and villages in Aberdeen, and take a tram ride up to Victoria Peak (the island’s highest peak sitting 1,308-feet above the city) for a stunning panoramic view. If you have time to go further, travel to Macau, a former Portuguese colony with a casino, and the New Territories of China, a Hong Kong bedroom community that “sleeps” near China’s border.

Day 70Port of Call Hong KongDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

Hong Kong is a place of contrasts. Sleek, glassy skyscrapers shine above Old World markets where chicken feet and dried squid are displayed for sale. Archaic wooden boats bob past sleek cruise liners. Subway stations and expressway interchanges dot a landscape cluttered with Rolls Royces and rickshaws. Hong Kong Island was ceded to Britain in 1842 when those serving the British crown attacked the island. Though it was deeded back to China in 1997, Hong Kong enjoys a high degree of autonomy, especially in its economy and municipal government. Hong Kong is one of the most unique Chinese cities in the world. The 417-square mile island off the coast of China offers visitors a slice of authentic Chinese culture with all the amenities of home. A modern metropolis teeming with eastern and western influences, Hong Kong is the world's third-largest financial center, the so-called “Wall Street of Asia,” and a shopping gold mine. Shopping? Yes indeed. Hong Kong is a duty-free port and the world's leading exporter of toys, garments, watches, and electronics. As a result, the vast majority of the 10 million annual visitors come with an empty suitcase that they fill up after visiting the malls, street bazaars (Stanley Market is world famous), textile and tailor shops, and jade and electronic stores. Those willing to look beyond the bargain-basement prices will find that Hong Kong is more than the world’s largest department store – it’s a cultural Mecca with wining and dining, museums, and historic attractions. Be sure to ride the world famous Star Ferry across the harbor to Hong Kong Island, admire the mansions on Repulse Bay, drop in to see the temples on Cat Street, visit the fishing boats and villages in Aberdeen, and take a tram ride up to Victoria Peak (the island’s highest peak sitting 1,308-feet above the city) for a stunning panoramic view. If you have time to go further, travel to Macau, a former Portuguese colony with a casino, and the New Territories of China, a Hong Kong bedroom community that “sleeps” near China’s border.

Day 71 Cruising
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Day 74Port of Call Singapore Arrival 7:00am

Overview

Though physically small, Singapore is an economic giant. It has been Southeast Asia's most modern city for over a century. The city blends Malay, Chinese, Arab, Indian and English cultures and religions. Its unique ethnic tapestry affords visitors a wide array of sightseeing and culinary opportunities from which to choose. A full calendar of traditional festivals and holidays celebrated throughout the year adds to its cultural appeal. In addition, Singapore offers luxury hotels, delectable cuisine and great shopping! Located at the tip of the Malay Peninsula, Singapore's tropical climate welcomes both leisure and business travelers year round. The island republic's excellent infrastructure enables visitors to enjoy its many sites and attractions in a safe, clean and green environment. Award winning Changi Airport provides airlinks to major cities around the world. The train and subway systems are clean, fast and efficient. In addition, its state-of-the-art cruise terminal has established Singapore as one of the premier cruising centers of South East Asia and an exciting port of call on any Asian cruise itinerary. In the city, there is no need for a car. Public transportation is excellent and walking is a good way to explore the city . All major attractions are also accessible by tour bus. Since the city is only 60 miles (100k) from the equator, the tropical temperatures do not vary much. Rainfall is fairly evenly distributed through the year. No matter when you choose to visit, warm weather will be abundantly available. The visitor is struck immediately by Singapore's abundance of parks, nature reserves, and lush, tropical greenery. Singapore's progress over the past three decades has been remarkable, yet the island has not been overwhelmed by development. Visitors will discover a wealth of historical treasures from the past, in the beauty of older buildings, values and traditions that have survived in the face of profound social and geographical change. Lacking any noteworthy natural resources, Singapore's early prosperity was based on a vigorous free trade policy, put in place in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles first established it as a British trading post. Later, mass industrialization bolstered the economy, and today the state boasts the world's second busiest port after Rotterdam, minimal unemployment, and a super efficient infrastructure. Almost the entire population lives in upscale new apartments, and the average per capita income is over US$12,000. Singapore is a clean, safe place to visit, its amenities are second to none and its public places are smoke-free and hygienic. Forming the core of downtown Singapore is the Colonial District. Each surrounding enclave has its own distinct flavor, from the aromatic spice stores of Little India, to the tumbledown backstreets of Chinatown, where it is still possible to find calligraphers and fortune tellers, or the Arab Quarter, whose cluttered stores sell fine cloths and silks. North of the city, are two nature preserves, Bukit Timah and the Central Catchment Area, along with the splendid Singapore Zoological Gardens. The east coast features good seafood restaurants set on long stretches of sandy beach. In addition there are over fifty islands and islets within Singaporean waters, all of which can be reached with varying degrees of ease. Day trips are popular to Sentosa, the island amusement arcade which is linked to the south coast by a short causeway and cable car. Music, theater, nightlife: all are abundant in this remarkable city. Singapore used to be considered a "stop over" on the way to larger Asian cities. This is no longer true! Visitors seek out Singapore for business and finance and also for a fascinating and satisfying vacation for the whole family. Strategically located at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula sixty miles from the equator, Singapore has for centuries been a crossroads between East and West. Chinese traders en route to India had navigated its waters from at least the 5th century. In the 14th century it was part of the powerful Vijayan Empire and was known as Tenmasek or Sea Town. Legend has it that it was renamed Singa Pura or Lion City after a visiting Sumatran prince saw an animal he mistook for a lion, an animal considered a good omen. Modern Singapore came into being in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles claimed what was then a small fishing village as a regional base for the East India Company. The island's natural harbor and location made it an ideal site for a trading post serving British trade interests between China, the Malay world and India. Singapore flourished as its free trade policy attracted merchants and residents from all over the world. Raffles initiated a town plan which included leveling one hill to form a new commercial district (now Raffles Place) and constructing government buildings around another hill (now called Fort Canning Hill). The British plan also involved separating the population according to ethnic categories with Europeans, Indians, Chinese and Malays each living and working in their own distinct quarters of the city. Revenues soared in ensuing years from the production of opium and rubber. Millionaires were made overnight. Immigration rose steadily. The island became Britain's strategic defense base in the Far East but fell to the Japanese in 1942. After the world war ended in 1945, Singapore became a crown colony. It gained self governing status in 1959 and independence in 1965 when it became part of the new state of Malaysia which united Malaya with Singapore, Sabah, and Sarawak. The alliance did not last. Singapore was used to being on its own, and within two years the island set up its own stable government and became known as the Republic of Singapore. Under Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew's leadership, Singapore continued to strengthen its infrastructure and its industrial base. Housing and urban renovation kept pace with population growth. The areas of health and education are strong. Singapore's leaders have also brought order and progress through strict regulation of social behavior. Smoking in public was banned, as was gum chewing. High economic growth rates have supported political stability. Singapore is the world's second busiest seaport, has an airport served by over 50 major airlines. It has state of the art communication and mass transit systems. It is Asia's premier center for finance and business and the world's third largest oil refining center. Over 7 million visit the tiny island every year.

Day 75Port of Call SingaporeDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Though physically small, Singapore is an economic giant. It has been Southeast Asia's most modern city for over a century. The city blends Malay, Chinese, Arab, Indian and English cultures and religions. Its unique ethnic tapestry affords visitors a wide array of sightseeing and culinary opportunities from which to choose. A full calendar of traditional festivals and holidays celebrated throughout the year adds to its cultural appeal. In addition, Singapore offers luxury hotels, delectable cuisine and great shopping! Located at the tip of the Malay Peninsula, Singapore's tropical climate welcomes both leisure and business travelers year round. The island republic's excellent infrastructure enables visitors to enjoy its many sites and attractions in a safe, clean and green environment. Award winning Changi Airport provides airlinks to major cities around the world. The train and subway systems are clean, fast and efficient. In addition, its state-of-the-art cruise terminal has established Singapore as one of the premier cruising centers of South East Asia and an exciting port of call on any Asian cruise itinerary. In the city, there is no need for a car. Public transportation is excellent and walking is a good way to explore the city . All major attractions are also accessible by tour bus. Since the city is only 60 miles (100k) from the equator, the tropical temperatures do not vary much. Rainfall is fairly evenly distributed through the year. No matter when you choose to visit, warm weather will be abundantly available. The visitor is struck immediately by Singapore's abundance of parks, nature reserves, and lush, tropical greenery. Singapore's progress over the past three decades has been remarkable, yet the island has not been overwhelmed by development. Visitors will discover a wealth of historical treasures from the past, in the beauty of older buildings, values and traditions that have survived in the face of profound social and geographical change. Lacking any noteworthy natural resources, Singapore's early prosperity was based on a vigorous free trade policy, put in place in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles first established it as a British trading post. Later, mass industrialization bolstered the economy, and today the state boasts the world's second busiest port after Rotterdam, minimal unemployment, and a super efficient infrastructure. Almost the entire population lives in upscale new apartments, and the average per capita income is over US$12,000. Singapore is a clean, safe place to visit, its amenities are second to none and its public places are smoke-free and hygienic. Forming the core of downtown Singapore is the Colonial District. Each surrounding enclave has its own distinct flavor, from the aromatic spice stores of Little India, to the tumbledown backstreets of Chinatown, where it is still possible to find calligraphers and fortune tellers, or the Arab Quarter, whose cluttered stores sell fine cloths and silks. North of the city, are two nature preserves, Bukit Timah and the Central Catchment Area, along with the splendid Singapore Zoological Gardens. The east coast features good seafood restaurants set on long stretches of sandy beach. In addition there are over fifty islands and islets within Singaporean waters, all of which can be reached with varying degrees of ease. Day trips are popular to Sentosa, the island amusement arcade which is linked to the south coast by a short causeway and cable car. Music, theater, nightlife: all are abundant in this remarkable city. Singapore used to be considered a "stop over" on the way to larger Asian cities. This is no longer true! Visitors seek out Singapore for business and finance and also for a fascinating and satisfying vacation for the whole family. Strategically located at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula sixty miles from the equator, Singapore has for centuries been a crossroads between East and West. Chinese traders en route to India had navigated its waters from at least the 5th century. In the 14th century it was part of the powerful Vijayan Empire and was known as Tenmasek or Sea Town. Legend has it that it was renamed Singa Pura or Lion City after a visiting Sumatran prince saw an animal he mistook for a lion, an animal considered a good omen. Modern Singapore came into being in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles claimed what was then a small fishing village as a regional base for the East India Company. The island's natural harbor and location made it an ideal site for a trading post serving British trade interests between China, the Malay world and India. Singapore flourished as its free trade policy attracted merchants and residents from all over the world. Raffles initiated a town plan which included leveling one hill to form a new commercial district (now Raffles Place) and constructing government buildings around another hill (now called Fort Canning Hill). The British plan also involved separating the population according to ethnic categories with Europeans, Indians, Chinese and Malays each living and working in their own distinct quarters of the city. Revenues soared in ensuing years from the production of opium and rubber. Millionaires were made overnight. Immigration rose steadily. The island became Britain's strategic defense base in the Far East but fell to the Japanese in 1942. After the world war ended in 1945, Singapore became a crown colony. It gained self governing status in 1959 and independence in 1965 when it became part of the new state of Malaysia which united Malaya with Singapore, Sabah, and Sarawak. The alliance did not last. Singapore was used to being on its own, and within two years the island set up its own stable government and became known as the Republic of Singapore. Under Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew's leadership, Singapore continued to strengthen its infrastructure and its industrial base. Housing and urban renovation kept pace with population growth. The areas of health and education are strong. Singapore's leaders have also brought order and progress through strict regulation of social behavior. Smoking in public was banned, as was gum chewing. High economic growth rates have supported political stability. Singapore is the world's second busiest seaport, has an airport served by over 50 major airlines. It has state of the art communication and mass transit systems. It is Asia's premier center for finance and business and the world's third largest oil refining center. Over 7 million visit the tiny island every year.

Day 76Port of Call Port Klang Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Port Klang is a town and the main gateway by sea into Malaysia. Known during colonial times as Port Swettenham but renamed Port Klang in July 1972, it is the largest port in the country.

Day 77 Cruising
Day 78 Cruising
Day 79 Cruising
Day 80Port of Call Colombo Arrival 7:00amDeparture 9:00pm

Overview

Colombo, the capital of Sri Lanka, has a long history as a port on ancient east-west trade routes, ruled successively by the Portuguese, Dutch and British. That heritage is reflected in its its architecture, mixing colonial buildings with high-rises and shopping malls. The imposing Colombo National Museum, dedicated to Sri Lankan history, borders sprawling Viharamahadevi Park and its giant Buddha.

Day 81 Cruising
Day 82 Cruising
Day 83 Cruising
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Day 85 Cruising
Day 86Port of Call Port Louis Arrival 8:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Port Louis is the capital city of Mauritius, in the Indian Ocean. It's known for its French colonial architecture and the 19th-century Champ de Mars horse-racing track. The Caudan Waterfront is a lively dining and shopping precinct. Nearby, vendors sell local produce and handicrafts at the huge Central Market. The Blue Penny Museum focuses on the island’s colonial and maritime history, along with its culture.

Day 87 Cruising
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Day 91Port of Call Port Elizabeth/South Africa Arrival 4:00amDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

Port Elizabeth is a city on Algoa Bay in South Africa's Eastern Cape Province. A major port, it's also known for its numerous beaches. The Donkin Heritage Trail takes in the Old Hill neighbourhood's Victorian landmarks. Coastal boat tours spot whales and rare seabirds, while wildlife reserves outside the metropolitan area are home to elephants, rhinos and other big game.

Day 92 Cruising
Day 93Port of Call Cape Town Arrival 5:30am

Overview

The cityscape of Cape Town reflects a history rich in contrasts: governors and slaves, reformers and missionaries, empire builders and ordinary people who became extraordinary role models for a new democratic nation. Beside soaring modern blocks of glass and steel in the city centre, historic buildings - preserved and restored to their former glory - bear testimony to this past. The oldest existing building in South Africa, the Castle was built in 1666 to protect the new settlement at the Cape. Still operational as a military base, today its five imposing stone walls also house a museum with artifacts dating back to the 17th century and troops dressed in historic uniform parade on its cobbled grounds. Nearby, across the Grand Parade, stand the Drill Hall and Cape Town's Italian Renaissance-style City Hall, completed in 1905. The Slave Lodge, the second oldest building in Cape Town, has served many purposes in its nearly three centuries. Originally built as accommodation for the slaves of the Dutch East India Company, it was also Cape Town's first post office, a library and the Supreme Court. Today it is home to the SA Cultural History Museum and its displays of ceramics, toys, silver and textiles from Cape Town's past, as well as artifacts from ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. The historic Company Gardens, established by Jan van Riebeeck in 1652 as a vegetable garden from which to supply fresh produce to passing ships, today offers city dwellers and office workers a peaceful refuge from the bustle of the city's commercial centre. A cobbled avenue, lined with oak trees, leads to the South African Museum, the South African National Gallery, the Bertram House Museum and the Jewish Museum, which is housed in the oldest synagogue in South Africa. Just beyond, South Africa's Parliament buildings stand in imposing array around the cobbles of Stal Plein ("plein" meaning "square"). Numerous other buildings of historic interest, such as Koopman de Wet House in Strand Street, Heritage Square in Bree Street, and many along the upper reaches of Long Street, are dotted throughout the city centre. Situated on the lower slopes of Signal Hill, the Bo-Kaap (literally "upper Cape") is home to many descendants of the Malay slaves brought to the Cape during the 17th century. Most of the families which inhabit its colourful rows of houses are devout Muslims, and the call to prayer can be heard in the narrow, cobbled streets throughout the day. The Bo-Kaap Museum portrays aspects of Cape Muslim culture. Robben Island is, after Alcatraz, possibly the best known prison island in the world. Having served over the centuries as a penal settlement, leper colony and lunatic asylum, its notoriety has, more recently, centred around the fact that President Nelson Mandela and many of his colleagues were imprisoned here during the apartheid era. Regular trips are made to the island, a world heritage site, by a ferry which departs from the V&A Waterfront. National monuments such as Onze Molen, along with Mostert's Mill in Mowbray one of the few original windmills still extant in the Cape Town area, and numerous old churches in Durbanville and Parow, reflect the origins of some of the early settlers in the Tygerberg area. Set in landscaped gardens, Rust-en-Vrede Cultural Centre in Durbanville - an old Cape Dutch complex dating back to 1850 - originally served as a prison, Drostdy (magistrates court), school and, ultimately, a private residence. Inside, creations by prominent South Africans are on exhibition in the Durbanville Clay Museum. A few kilometres away in Khayelitsha, the Mayibuye Centre Museum reflects the political turbulence and memorabilia of the apartheid era. Somerset West, in the Helderberg region, boasts many buildings and artifacts from South Africa's diverse cultural past. These include Vergelegen, built in 1700 by Governor Willem Adriaan van der Stel, the Nederduitse Gereformeerde Kerk built in 1820 (where "Onze Jan" Hofmeyer and other prominent South Africans are buried), the old bridge over the Lourens River built in 1845, the coachman's cottage and the Ou Pastorie and, at the Macassar Kramat, the last resting place of Sheikh Yusuf, who was brought to South Africa as a slave and introduced Islam, today one of the Cape's major religions - to the area. The historic farms in the Oostenberg countryside, dating back to the 18th century, serve as a reminder of the area's agricultural heritage. Many of these fine examples of early Cape Dutch architecture, such as Zevenwacht, Hazendal and Mooiplaas Wine Estates, are still operating wine farms, producing outstanding vintages for South Africa's thriving wine industry. Other, less imposing though no less important souvenirs of the area's rich history include the historic milestone in Van Riebeeck Road, Kuilsriver (now on display in the entrance hall to the Municipal Building), which once marked the distance on the road from Cape Town to what, in the late 17th century, was a cattle-post near the convergence of the Kuils and Bottleray Rivers Just beyond the row of stately palms that marks the entrance to Milnerton stands an old wooden bridge (1901) that, while no longer in use, still links Woodbridge Island to the mainland. A cast of the original Postal Stone can be seen at the library in Table View, and Ons Huisie Restaurant, a restored fisherman's cottage in Bloubergstrand, typifies the vernacular architectural style of this region. Further up the coast are the historic Moravian Mission Stations of Pella and Mamre with a church dating back to 1808, an old watermill, cook house, long house, shop and school. Built in 1685 for Simon van der Stel, then governor of the Cape, Groot Constantia is the oldest homestead in the Cape. Reflecting the gracious lifestyle of the late 18th century, the manor house incorporates priceless collections of exquisite Cape furniture from the mid-1800s as well as rare Chinese and Japanese porcelains and Delft ceramics. Situated along the False Bay Coast in the South Peninsula, the suburbs of Kalk Bay, St James and Muizenberg were fashionable seaside resorts during the early part of this century. Many of the beautiful residences in St James are, in fact, National Monuments, while Muizenberg is reputed to have been one of Rudyard Kipling's favourite places, and is where Cecil John Rhodes retired after the events leading up to the Anglo-Boer War. Period furniture and some of this extraordinary man's personal possessions may be viewed at Rhodes Cottage. Once a whaling station, Kalk Bay is now a working fishing harbour that reflects its cosmopolitan past in architecture, cuisine, arts and crafts.

Day 94Port of Call Cape TownDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

The cityscape of Cape Town reflects a history rich in contrasts: governors and slaves, reformers and missionaries, empire builders and ordinary people who became extraordinary role models for a new democratic nation. Beside soaring modern blocks of glass and steel in the city centre, historic buildings - preserved and restored to their former glory - bear testimony to this past. The oldest existing building in South Africa, the Castle was built in 1666 to protect the new settlement at the Cape. Still operational as a military base, today its five imposing stone walls also house a museum with artifacts dating back to the 17th century and troops dressed in historic uniform parade on its cobbled grounds. Nearby, across the Grand Parade, stand the Drill Hall and Cape Town's Italian Renaissance-style City Hall, completed in 1905. The Slave Lodge, the second oldest building in Cape Town, has served many purposes in its nearly three centuries. Originally built as accommodation for the slaves of the Dutch East India Company, it was also Cape Town's first post office, a library and the Supreme Court. Today it is home to the SA Cultural History Museum and its displays of ceramics, toys, silver and textiles from Cape Town's past, as well as artifacts from ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. The historic Company Gardens, established by Jan van Riebeeck in 1652 as a vegetable garden from which to supply fresh produce to passing ships, today offers city dwellers and office workers a peaceful refuge from the bustle of the city's commercial centre. A cobbled avenue, lined with oak trees, leads to the South African Museum, the South African National Gallery, the Bertram House Museum and the Jewish Museum, which is housed in the oldest synagogue in South Africa. Just beyond, South Africa's Parliament buildings stand in imposing array around the cobbles of Stal Plein ("plein" meaning "square"). Numerous other buildings of historic interest, such as Koopman de Wet House in Strand Street, Heritage Square in Bree Street, and many along the upper reaches of Long Street, are dotted throughout the city centre. Situated on the lower slopes of Signal Hill, the Bo-Kaap (literally "upper Cape") is home to many descendants of the Malay slaves brought to the Cape during the 17th century. Most of the families which inhabit its colourful rows of houses are devout Muslims, and the call to prayer can be heard in the narrow, cobbled streets throughout the day. The Bo-Kaap Museum portrays aspects of Cape Muslim culture. Robben Island is, after Alcatraz, possibly the best known prison island in the world. Having served over the centuries as a penal settlement, leper colony and lunatic asylum, its notoriety has, more recently, centred around the fact that President Nelson Mandela and many of his colleagues were imprisoned here during the apartheid era. Regular trips are made to the island, a world heritage site, by a ferry which departs from the V&A Waterfront. National monuments such as Onze Molen, along with Mostert's Mill in Mowbray one of the few original windmills still extant in the Cape Town area, and numerous old churches in Durbanville and Parow, reflect the origins of some of the early settlers in the Tygerberg area. Set in landscaped gardens, Rust-en-Vrede Cultural Centre in Durbanville - an old Cape Dutch complex dating back to 1850 - originally served as a prison, Drostdy (magistrates court), school and, ultimately, a private residence. Inside, creations by prominent South Africans are on exhibition in the Durbanville Clay Museum. A few kilometres away in Khayelitsha, the Mayibuye Centre Museum reflects the political turbulence and memorabilia of the apartheid era. Somerset West, in the Helderberg region, boasts many buildings and artifacts from South Africa's diverse cultural past. These include Vergelegen, built in 1700 by Governor Willem Adriaan van der Stel, the Nederduitse Gereformeerde Kerk built in 1820 (where "Onze Jan" Hofmeyer and other prominent South Africans are buried), the old bridge over the Lourens River built in 1845, the coachman's cottage and the Ou Pastorie and, at the Macassar Kramat, the last resting place of Sheikh Yusuf, who was brought to South Africa as a slave and introduced Islam, today one of the Cape's major religions - to the area. The historic farms in the Oostenberg countryside, dating back to the 18th century, serve as a reminder of the area's agricultural heritage. Many of these fine examples of early Cape Dutch architecture, such as Zevenwacht, Hazendal and Mooiplaas Wine Estates, are still operating wine farms, producing outstanding vintages for South Africa's thriving wine industry. Other, less imposing though no less important souvenirs of the area's rich history include the historic milestone in Van Riebeeck Road, Kuilsriver (now on display in the entrance hall to the Municipal Building), which once marked the distance on the road from Cape Town to what, in the late 17th century, was a cattle-post near the convergence of the Kuils and Bottleray Rivers Just beyond the row of stately palms that marks the entrance to Milnerton stands an old wooden bridge (1901) that, while no longer in use, still links Woodbridge Island to the mainland. A cast of the original Postal Stone can be seen at the library in Table View, and Ons Huisie Restaurant, a restored fisherman's cottage in Bloubergstrand, typifies the vernacular architectural style of this region. Further up the coast are the historic Moravian Mission Stations of Pella and Mamre with a church dating back to 1808, an old watermill, cook house, long house, shop and school. Built in 1685 for Simon van der Stel, then governor of the Cape, Groot Constantia is the oldest homestead in the Cape. Reflecting the gracious lifestyle of the late 18th century, the manor house incorporates priceless collections of exquisite Cape furniture from the mid-1800s as well as rare Chinese and Japanese porcelains and Delft ceramics. Situated along the False Bay Coast in the South Peninsula, the suburbs of Kalk Bay, St James and Muizenberg were fashionable seaside resorts during the early part of this century. Many of the beautiful residences in St James are, in fact, National Monuments, while Muizenberg is reputed to have been one of Rudyard Kipling's favourite places, and is where Cecil John Rhodes retired after the events leading up to the Anglo-Boer War. Period furniture and some of this extraordinary man's personal possessions may be viewed at Rhodes Cottage. Once a whaling station, Kalk Bay is now a working fishing harbour that reflects its cosmopolitan past in architecture, cuisine, arts and crafts.

Day 95 Cruising
Day 96Port of Call Walvis Bay Arrival 6:30amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Walvis Bay is a city in Namibia and the name of the bay on which it lies. The town covers a total area of 29 square kilometres of land.The bay is a safe haven for sea vessels because of its natural deepwater harbour, protected by the Pelican Point sand spit, being the only natural harbour of any size along the country's coast. Being rich in plankton and marine life, these waters also drew large numbers of southern right whales,attracting whalers and fishing vessels.

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Day 104 Cruising
Day 105Port of Call Tenerife Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

The island of Tenerife is the largest of the Canary archipelago - 2,053 square kilometres - and it has the shape characteristic of a triangle. The island of eternal spring because of its peerless climate is full of huge contrasts and has a great variety of scenery in the different regions. A mountain chain runs through its centre fro Anaga to Teno and on both of its slopes there are large, exuberantly fertile valleys, among them especially La Orotava and Gumar. In the heart of the chain there is a gigantic, natural crater, called Las Cañadas del Teide, which is about 29 km across and has officially been declared a National Park. It lies over 2,000 m above sea level. North of the crater stands El Pico del Teide, a 3,718 m high mountain, which is the highest point in Spain. It is snowcovered in the winter and marks the island with its unique silhouette. Tenerife has an extremely varied plant life, large, wooded mountains, extensive areas where banana, tomato, potato and other agricultural products are grown. Its coast is rocky and lined by cliffs in some places, while in others there are beaches with soft, clean sand, which are sometimes black and sometimes golden. The capital of the island and of the province is Santa Cruz de Tenerife, which has 220,000 inhabitants. It is a cheerful, light-filled, modern city on a gentle slope and it is open towards the wide plains in the south. It is the seat of the military headquarters, La Capitanía General de Canarias, and Santa Cruz is known as a hospitable, cordial city. Beautiful gardens, especially García Sanabria, the Municipal Park, and busy streets make it easy for the visitor to feel at home there. The port in a large bay surrounded by the steep cliffs of the Anaga mountain chain is an important sea traffic and communications centre between Europe, Africa and America. It is visited by ships from all kinds of countries and numerous tourist cruises make it their port of call throughout the year. It is the busiest Spanish port as regards the movement of goods and it is among the most important regarding the number of ships. The whole city deliberately moves down towards the port and comes to rest, though full of bustling activity, in the nearby España and La Candelaria Squares. Around the latter there are some of the important official buildings, such as El Cabildo Insular, the island government building, where the Archaeological and Anthropological Museum is found; Carta Palace - a curious example of regional architecture and decoration, dating from the 17C and today officially a Sight of Interest to National Art and Architecture -, the Casino Principal, the Monument to the Fallen and El Triunfo de la Candelaria are also found in this area. La Concepción's is the most important church. Its nave and four aisles shelter interesting Baroque works of art and most valuable reminders of Canary history. There La Cruz de la Conquista, the Cross of Conquest, is kept together with the flags taken from Sir Horace Nelson, the British admiral, on the occasion of his unsuccessful attack on the fortified city. Carta Chapel and the beautiful choir stalls, which are found in the presbytery today, are also of interest to art. Another church worthy of special mention is San Francisco's, which is 18C Baroque next to a beautiful square. On El Principe Square with its lush laurel trees, there is the Municipal Museum of Paintings and Sculpture, with important paintings by Ribera, B. Brueghel, Madrazo, Van Loo, etc., as well as a department especially dedicated to Canary painting. On Anaga Avenue, a beautiful, broad thoroughfare skirting the port area of Santa Cruz, there is Paso Alto Castle and its Military Museum - where objects reminiscent of the past are kept -, a peaceful place for a walk near the Royal Yacht Club of Tenerife, which lies in the vicinity of the Nautical School and close to La Casa del mar. There is a magnificent view of the bay. The Provincial Public Library and the Provincial Office of Records are found in La Casa de la Cultura, comodoro Rodin St. Near the city centre, there are two Places of Interest to National tourism: las Teresitas, with a 1,500m long, artificial beach of golden sands, and Las Gaviotas. Especially noteworthy is the picturesque Taganana are, with the El Roque and Almáciga beaches of black sand. The Reina Sofía International Airport - Tenerife Sur - lies 60km from Santa Cruz and the Tenerife Norte Airport is nine kilometres away. The capital is the point of departure of the great southern motorway of the island, which links Santa Cruz with the different places and tourist centres of that area, and of the northern motorway, which leads to the important tourist centre of El Puerto de la Cruz; 22km from the capital lies Mount La Esperanza, covered with extensive Canary pine forests. There is a road crossing over it leading to Las Cañadas del Teide. On the way there are observation platforms with breathtaking views of the islands.

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Day 109Port of Call Southampton Arrival 6:00am

Overview

Southampton is a port city on England’s south coast. It’s home to the SeaCity Museum, with an interactive model of the Titanic, which departed from Southampton in 1912. Nearby, Southampton City Art Gallery specialises in modern British art. Solent Sky Museum features vintage aircraft like the iconic Spitfire. Tudor House & Garden displays artifacts covering over 800 years of history, including a penny-farthing bike.

Onboard the Queen Victoria

Ship Rating

4.5 of 5 stars

Costco Member Rating:
4.4/5 (81 Ratings)

Queen Victoria® is known for her elegance and her graceful splendour. Her unique facilities are amongst the most modern you will find and yet she has a special ambience so evocative of great liners past. With luxurious marbles, woods and rich fabrics she exudes elegance and is adored by her crew and passengers alike. Queen Victoria is infused with a sense of luxury and tradition, from the Royal Court Theatre, which includes the first private viewing boxes at sea, to the signature two-story library, featuring a spiral staircase and nearly 6,000 volumes, and "Cunardia," the first Cunard museum display at sea.

Onboard Activities

Activities & Services (included in cruise)

Library

  • Card Room
  • Casino
  • Disco/Nightclub
  • Movies
  • Theater/Show Lounge
  • Fitness Center
  • Sauna/Steam Room
  • Educational Programs
  • Pool - Children's
  • Pool - Outdoor
  • Whirlpool/Jacuzzi
  • Art Gallery
  • Bars/Lounges
  • Library
  • Children's Outdoor Play Area
  • Organized Age Specific Activities
  • Teen Center or Disco
  • Teen Programs
  • Business Center
  • Concierge Desk
  • Duty-Free Shops/Boutiques
  • Elevators
  • Safe Deposit Boxes

Activities & Services (available for an extra fee)

Shopping

  • Beauty Salon
  • Full-Service Spa
  • Internet Center
  • Babysitting
  • Dry Cleaning/ Laundry Service
  • Infirmary/Medical Center
  • Self-Service Laundromat

Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the cruise line without notice. Staterooms designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Dining

Queens Grill

Main Dining

Queens Grill Restaurant: Guests staying in the Queens Grill Suites have a table reserved in the Queens Grill Restaurant. You'll always be greeted warmly by name, and appreciate attentive service during breakfast, lunch and dinner. Dinner is served when you wish between 6:30 – 9 p.m.

Princess Grill Restaurant: The sophisticated, intimate Princess Grill serves up excellent cuisine for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Dinner is served when you wish between 6:30 – 9 p.m. To match your choice, a sommelier will gladly talk through the impressive wine list. In warmer weather the courtyard offers alfresco dining, wonderful in more exotic parts of the world.

Britannnia Club Restaurant: The Britannia Club Restaurant boasts the same grandeur as the neighboring Britannia Restaurant, but with an intimate dining club atmosphere. Dine in the evening here whenever it suits you between 6:30 – 9 p.m.

Britannia Restaurant: Your table reservation is at Britannia Restaurant, where grandeur and occasion combine with exceptional service. Breakfast and lunch always feel special here and whether you've chosen to take your seat for dinner at 6 or 8.30 p.m., you can arrive with a flourish, down the steps of the curved staircase.

The Verandah

Specialty Dining

The Verandah: Steakhouse at The Verandah restaurant offers a sublime experience, whether it's lunch or dinner. Showcasing specialties such as prime USDA grain-finished New York strip steak and Alaskan king crab, alongside dishes celebrating British origin such as Salt Marsh lamb rack, as well as renowned Wagyu beef from farther afield. The menu is a celebration of the fine provenance of the US, British Isles and Australia. The Verandah takes design inspiration from the original Verandah Grill on board Queen Mary. This restaurant is available for an additional cost.

Casual Dining

Lido Restaurant: Should you prefer a club sandwich or a light bite in the afternoon, head for the Lido Restaurant where buffet dining is available throughout the day. By evening it transforms into one of three regional venues: Asado is a South American Grill; Jasmine serves up exquisite Asian cuisine; while Aztec tempts you with interpretations of Mexican classics.

Golden Lion Pub: A Cunard favorite, choose from a wide selection of beer, cider and wine to compliment the delicious gastro pub style menus in a comfortable, traditional setting. Enjoy all the British pub essentials such as quizzes, live music and screens to show your favorite sporting events.

Café Carinthia: Succumb to the varieties of fragrant specialty teas, rich aromatic coffees and indulgent pastries while overlooking the beautiful Grand Lobby. This restaurant is available for an additional cost.


Times, costs and other specifics are outside the control of Costco Travel. All information is at the sole discretion of the cruise line and is subject to change without notice. Dining time and table size preferences are submitted to the cruise line on a first-come, first-served request basis and are confirmed aboard ship. Questions, concerns and/or special needs regarding dining arrangements must be addressed with the maitre d' hotel aboard ship. Every effort is made to accommodate travelers' preferences; however, Costco Travel cannot guarantee dining arrangements. In specialty restaurants, space is limited and reservations are recommended. A cover charge and dress code may apply.

Staterooms

Standard Inside (Category: IF)

Category: IF
Area: Approximately 152 sq. ft.

Your spacious stateroom boasts a king-sized bed, satellite TV, sofa, tea and coffee making facilities and mini-bar. Enjoy nightly turndown service, complimentary 24 hour room service, Penhaligon's toiletries, robes and slippers.

Standard Inside (Category: IE)

Category: IE
Area: Approximately 152 sq. ft.

Your spacious stateroom boasts a king-sized bed, satellite TV, sofa, tea and coffee making facilities and mini-bar. Enjoy nightly turndown service, complimentary 24 hour room service, Penhaligon's toiletries, robes and slippers.

Standard Inside (Category: ID)

Category: ID
Area: Approximately 152 sq. ft.

Your spacious stateroom boasts a king-sized bed, satellite TV, sofa, tea and coffee making facilities and mini-bar. Enjoy nightly turndown service, complimentary 24 hour room service, Penhaligon's toiletries, robes and slippers.

Standard Inside (Category: IA)

Category: IA
Area: Approximately 152 sq. ft.

Your spacious stateroom boasts a king-sized bed, satellite TV, sofa, tea and coffee making facilities and mini-bar. Enjoy nightly turndown service, complimentary 24 hour room service, Penhaligon's toiletries, robes and slippers.

Deluxe Inside (Category: GC)

Category: GC
Area: Approximately 207 sq. ft.

Our most spacious inside staterooms offer you all the luxurious details including nightly turndown service and 24-hour room service. There's a king-sized bed, sofa, satellite TV, tea and coffee making facilities and mini-bar.

Deluxe Inside (Category: GB)

Category: GB
Area: Approximately 207 sq. ft.

Our most spacious inside staterooms offer you all the luxurious details including nightly turndown service and 24-hour room service. There's a king-sized bed, sofa, satellite TV, tea and coffee making facilities and mini-bar.

Deluxe Inside (Category: GA)

Category: GA
Area: Approximately 200-243 sq. ft.

Our most spacious inside staterooms offer you all the luxurious details including nightly turndown service and 24-hour room service. There's a king-sized bed, sofa, satellite TV, tea and coffee making facilities and mini-bar.

Single Inside (Category: LC)

Category: LC
Area: Approximately 159 sq. ft.

Your spacious retreat is perfectly appointed with a generously sized bed, bathroom with shower and all the luxuries of the Britannia experience such as 24-hour room service, Penhaligon's toiletries and nightly turndown service.

Oceanview, obstructed view (Category: FC)

Category: FC
Area: Approximately 180 sq. ft.

Enjoy natural daylight as you awake in your king-sized bed. Relax in your living area with sofa, tea and coffee making facilities, satellite TV and mini-bar. The view from your window is slightly obscured due to its position.

Oceanview, obstructed view (Category: FB)

Category: FB
Area: Approximately 180 sq. ft.

Enjoy natural daylight as you awake in your king-sized bed. Relax in your living area with sofa, tea and coffee making facilities, satellite TV and mini-bar. The view from your window is slightly obscured due to its position.

Oceanview (Category: EF)

Category: EF
Area: Approximately 197-201 sq. ft.

Awaken to natural daylight and a new view each day as you explore the world. You'll appreciate the king-sized bed, living area with desk and sofa, tea and coffee making facilities, satellite TV, ample storage and mini-bar.

Oceanview (Category: EC)

Category: EC
Area: Approximately 197 sq. ft.

Awaken to natural daylight and a new view each day as you explore the world. You'll appreciate the king-sized bed, living area with desk and sofa, tea and coffee making facilities, satellite TV, ample storage and mini-bar.

Oceanview (Category: EB)

Category: EB
Area: Approximately 197 sq. ft.

Awaken to natural daylight and a new view each day as you explore the world. You'll appreciate the king-sized bed, living area with desk and sofa, tea and coffee making facilities, satellite TV, ample storage and mini-bar.

Single Oceanview (Category: KC)

Category: KC
Area: Approximately 133-168 sq. ft.

You'll appreciate natural daylight and magical views from your spacious Single Oceanview stateroom. Enjoy the generously sized bed and all the luxuries of the Britannia experience including 24 hour complimentary room service.

Balcony, obstructed view (Category: CB)

Category: CB
Area: Approximately 228-408 sq. ft.

These refined staterooms feature a king-sized bed, living area with sofa and desk, satellite TV, tea and coffee-making facilities and mini bar. Your private balcony has a slightly obstructed view due to its position on the ship.

Balcony, obstructed view (Category: CA)

Category: CA
Area: Approximately 228 sq. ft.

These refined staterooms feature a king-sized bed, living area with sofa and desk, satellite TV, tea and coffee-making facilities and mini bar. Your private balcony has a slightly obstructed view due to its position on the ship.

Balcony (Category: BF)

Category: BF
Area: Approximately 242-264 sq. ft.

Your spacious stateroom is bathed in daylight and the king-sized bed and turndown service ensure a good sleep. Relax on your balcony or in your living area with sofa, satellite TV, tea and coffee-making facilities and mini bar.

Balcony (Category: BE)

Category: BE
Area: Approximately 242-339 sq. ft.

Your spacious stateroom is bathed in daylight and the king-sized bed and turndown service ensure a good sleep. Relax on your balcony or in your living area with sofa, satellite TV, tea and coffee-making facilities and mini bar.

Balcony (Category: BD)

Category: BD
Area: Approximately 242 sq. ft.

Your spacious stateroom is bathed in daylight and the king-sized bed and turndown service ensure a good sleep. Relax on your balcony or in your living area with sofa, satellite TV, tea and coffee-making facilities and mini bar.

Balcony (Category: BC)

Category: BC
Area: Approximately 256-383 sq. ft.

Your spacious stateroom is bathed in daylight and the king-sized bed and turndown service ensure a good sleep. Relax on your balcony or in your living area with sofa, satellite TV, tea and coffee-making facilities and mini bar.

Balcony (Category: BB)

Category: BB
Area: Approximately 228-470 sq. ft.

Your spacious stateroom is bathed in daylight and the king-sized bed and turndown service ensure a good sleep. Relax on your balcony or in your living area with sofa, satellite TV, tea and coffee-making facilities and mini bar.

Balcony (Category: BA)

Category: BA
Area: Approximately 228-472 sq. ft.

Your spacious stateroom is bathed in daylight and the king-sized bed and turndown service ensure a good sleep. Relax on your balcony or in your living area with sofa, satellite TV, tea and coffee-making facilities and mini bar.

Club Balcony (Category: A2)

Category: A2
Area: Approximately 258-307 sq. ft.

Your Club Balcony stateroom has all the hallmarks of Cunard style with its king-sized bed and luxurious bathroom. You'll appreciate the pillow concierge menu and the choice to dine when you wish in the Britannia Club restaurant.

Club Balcony (Category: A1)

Category: A1
Area: Approximately 254-470 sq. ft.

Your Club Balcony stateroom has all the hallmarks of Cunard style with its king-sized bed and luxurious bathroom. You'll appreciate the pillow concierge menu and the choice to dine when you wish in the Britannia Club restaurant.

Princess Suite (Category: P2)

Category: P2
Area: Approximately 335-513 sq. ft.

Your refined Princess Suite offers a spacious balcony, bathroom with bath and shower, king-sized bed, dressing room and living area with sofa. Luxurious amenities include Penhaligon's toiletries and pillow concierge menu.

Princess Suite (Category: P1)

Category: P1
Area: Approximately 335-345 sq. ft.

Your refined Princess Suite offers a spacious balcony, bathroom with bath and shower, king-sized bed, dressing room and living area with sofa. Luxurious amenities include Penhaligon's toiletries and pillow concierge menu.

Queens Suite (Category: Q6)

Category: Q6
Area: Approximately 484-707 sq. ft.

These luxurious balcony suites include a king-sized bed, dressing area, spacious bathroom with bath and shower. Relax in your lounge area, enjoy generous amenities, pre-dinner canapés and the services of your butler and concierge.

Queens Suite (Category: Q5)

Category: Q5
Area: Approximately 538-757 sq. ft.

These luxurious balcony suites include a king-sized bed, dressing area, spacious bathroom with bath and shower. Relax in your lounge area, enjoy generous amenities, pre-dinner canapés and the services of your butler and concierge.

Penthouse (Category: Q4)

Category: Q4
Area: Approximately 508 sq. ft.

These refined balcony suites are located in an enviable midships position. You'll appreciate the king-sized bed, dressing area and bathroom with separate bath and shower. Generous amenities including complimentary mini-bar.

Penthouse (Category: Q3)

Category: Q3
Area: Approximately 520-596 sq. ft.

These refined balcony suites are located in an enviable midships position. You'll appreciate the king-sized bed, dressing area and bathroom with separate bath and shower. Generous amenities including complimentary mini-bar.

Master Suite (Category: Q2)

Category: Q2
Area: Approximately 1100 sq. ft.

These spacious suites feature a king-sized bed, marble bathroom and dressing area. You may choose to dine in-suite from the Queens Grill restaurant menu and relax on your expansive private deck.

Grand Suite (Category: Q1)

Category: Q1
Area: Approximately 1,319-1,555 sq. ft.

The most lavish suites on Queen Victoria have a sleeping area with king-sized bed, twin marble bathrooms and dressing rooms. There's room to entertain your guests, including on your own spacious private deck.

Deck Plan

Cruise Ship
Deck 12
Key to Symbols
SymbolDescription
LiftLift
2 lower berths and 1 upper berth2 lower berths and 1 upper berth
3rd berth is a single sofa bed3rd berth is a single sofa bed
3rd and 4th berth is a single sofa bed and one upper bed3rd and 4th berth is a single sofa bed and one upper bed
Views obstructed by lifeboatsViews obstructed by lifeboats
Views partially obstructed by lifeboat mechanismViews partially obstructed by lifeboat mechanism
Wheelchair-accessibleWheelchair-accessible
Staterooms are shaded by bridge wingsStaterooms are shaded by bridge wings
Stateroom has forward-facing ocean viewsStateroom has forward-facing ocean views
Stateroom has metal-fronted balconyStateroom has metal-fronted balcony
3rd and 4th berths are single sofabeds3rd and 4th berths are single sofabeds

Ship Facts

Queen Victoria ship image
  • Ship Name: Queen Victoria
  • Year Built: 2007
  • Year Refurbished: 2017
  • Year Entered Present Fleet: 2007
  • Maximum Capacity: 2,289
  • Number of Passenger Decks: 12
  • Number of Crew: 1,000
  • Officers' Nationality: British
  • Ocean-View without Balcony: 147
  • Ocean-View with Balcony: 609
  • Total Inside Staterooms: 151
  • Tonnage (GRT): 90,000
  • Capacity Based on Double Occupancy: 2,081
  • Country of Registry: Bermuda
  • Total Staterooms: 1,035
  • Suites with Balcony: 127
  • Crew/Hotel Staff Nationality: International
Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the hotel, resort or cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the provider without notice. Hotels, resorts, ships or accommodations designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Available Dates & Prices

Departure Date

Inside Stateroom

Ocean View Stateroom

Balcony Stateroom

Suite Stateroom

Terms & Conditions

*Price shown is per person based on double occupancy, is valid for select stateroom categories only, and does not include government taxes/fees and gratuities. Click on Terms & Conditions link below for details.

†The exact amount of the Costco Shop Card will be calculated during the booking process. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for additional information.

Ship's registry: Bermuda

    Package ID: CUNVICWOR20220110