World Cruise: 2022 Grand World Voyage Cruise

Holland America Line

On this circumnavigation of the globe, explore from the Amazon through Asia with overnights in Tokyo, Singapore and Mumbai. Sample the Mid-East in Petra and Jerusalem, overnighting in Istanbul before delving into the Mediterranean.

Included Extras

Executive Member Benefit

  • Executive Members earn an annual 2% Reward on Costco Travel purchases

Costco Shop Card

  • Member Exclusive: Costco Shop Card with every Holland America Line sailing†

Sailing Itinerary

Note: Cruise itineraries are subject to change. Please verify ports and times directly with the cruise line.

Day 1Port of Call Fort LauderdaleDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Ft Lauderdale is a city of islands held together by an intricate web of canals, rivers, bays and waterways hundreds of miles long. Needless to say, boating is a favorite city pastime, whether zooming along on a speedboat, enjoying a fishing charter, or cruising the coastline by yacht. Beautiful homes of every size and style make up the bulk of this primarily residential area. By the beach, a leisurly stroll can be taken along the new landscaping wavewall design of the beachfront promenade. But this city is anything but sedate. Once a spring break hot spot, the town still has an energetic and colorful nightlife. Nearby, charming Laudrdale-By-the-Sea is home to one of the only living coral reefs in the US accesible from shore. Las Olas Boulevard, a shoppers paradise, is the chic new shopping and trendy dining area of downtown. If sports are more your inclination, dozens of golf courses and hundreds of public parks allow you to absorb the great Florida outdoors. Cultural arts are also popular. Water taxis bring theater-goers from throughout the city to the Performing Arts Center on the water.

Day 2 Cruising
Day 3 Cruising
Day 4 Cruising
Day 5Port of Call Scarborough/Trinidad-Tobago Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Tobago’s capital is quite lively. The inter-island ferry docks in lower Scarborough, where you’ll also find the bus terminal, food outlets, the main market, the island’s only mall and an occasional speaker’s corner.

Day 6 Cruising
Day 7Port of Call Devils Island Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Ile du Diable, Devil's Island, off the coast of French Guiana, is one of the three Iles du Salut (Islands of Salvation or Health), so named because they provided a more healthy environment than the mainland for the French gold seekers of the 1760's. The other two are Ile St. Joseph and Ile Royale, separated from Devil's Island by a vicious tide. In later years, Ile du Diable, became part of the prison system developed in French Guiana. Other locations were on the mainland, and the other two islands, but over time, the entire penal colony was called Devil's Island.

Day 8Amazon River

Overview

The Amazon River and Flooded Forests ecoregion contains an extremely high number of freshwater animal species, including two species of freshwater dolphins. The ecoregion is characterized by extensive forested areas that become flooded during each rainy season. These "flooded forests" in the Amazon region are the most extensive of this habitat type in the entire world. The cycle of flooding, and the annual regeneration that it produces, represent a globally outstanding ecological phenomenon. The entire Amazon basin contains the largest number of freshwater fish species in the world, estimated at more than 3,000 species. Every year the Amazon River rises more than 30 feet (9 m) and floods surrounding forests. These rising waters replenish nutrients in floodplain areas and regenerate floodplain lakes, floating meadows, and other seasonal habitats. Freshwater fish move into these flooded forests and often feed on the fruits that drop from the trees. The Amazon is the second longest river in the world (after the Nile), stretching 4,000 miles (6,400 kilometers). But it's the largest when it comes to volume. The Amazon contains 20 percent of the Earth's fresh water, which it carries from high up in the Andes Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean. Along the way, it picks up rich soil that flows into dozens of streams and small rivers. The Amazon Basin has two freshwater systems, the igapó (blackwater) and the varzea (whitewater). The varzea contains a large amount of minerals that fertilize land and help trees and other vegetation grow.

Day 8 Cruising
Day 9Port of Call Macapa Arrival 6:00amDeparture 10:00am

Overview

MACAPA , on the north bank of the Amazon and right on the equator, is the gateway to the state of Amapá and home to three-quarters of its population. Surrounded by uninhabited forests and hills, it dominates the northern section of the Amazon estuary. If you're coming by ferry from Belém you'll actually arrive to the southwest at Porto do Santana , just twenty minutes by bus or an hour by boat from Macapa, though it lies on the other side of the equator. The airport is 4km from town on Rua Hildemar Maia (tel 096/223-2323). The Rodoviaria faces the Policia Tecnica, 5km outside town on the BR-156; from there, local buses run to Praça Veiga Cabral in the centre. The countryside around Macapá is, like the Ilha do Marajó in the estuary, roamed by large herds of water buffalo. In town there is not a great deal to do. The highlight is the Fortaleza de São José (daily 8am-6pm), one of the largest colonial forts in Brazil, built in 1764 out of material brought over as ballast in Portuguese ships, in response to worries that the French had designs on the north bank of the Amazon. It is often closed, but nobody will mind if you slip through the enormous main gates for a stroll along the battlements. There's an interesting daily artisan market nearby on Canal da Fortaleza, and you could fill some more time checking out the eighteenth-century Igreja São José de Macapá on the Praça Veiga Cabral and the Museu Histórico at Av. Mario Cruz 17 (Tues-Sun 8am-noon & 2-6pm). There's also a small private museum, the Instituto de Estudos e Pesquisas de Plantas Medicinais (IEPA) at Av. Feliciano Coelho 1509, holding the Valdemiro Gomes collection of minerals, Amazon woods and medicinal plants .

Day 9 Crossing the Equator
Day 9 Cruising
Day 10Port of Call Alter do Chao Arrival 11:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Alter-do-Chao village is 30 km from Santarem. It is the most sought after village in the region and a popular stop in the route of foreign cruises. Bathed by the Tapajos river, its beach are temporary, depending on the tides of the river. One of the curiosities of the place is the green lake, whose waters change during the day, from blue to green. Annually, in September, the Party of the Caire happens, a folcloric and religious manifestation that lasts 8 days. They several presentations of dance and music of quaint names: camelu, desfeiteira, lundu, the waltz of tip of the handkerchief, marambire, quadrilha, cruisador tupi, macucaua, cecuiara and many others.

Day 11Port of Call Boca Do Valerio Arrival 7:00amDeparture 2:00pm

Overview

This small village on the mouth of the Valeria River, a tributary of the Amazon, is the home of around 75 "ribeirrinhos" or river people. Here, you'll have the opportunity to see how they live, shop for handmade crafts and to wander through the village.

Day 12Port of Call Manaus Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

MANAUS is the capital of Amazonas, a tropical forest state covering around one and a half million square kilometres. It is also the commercial and physical hub of the entire Amazon region. Most visitors are surprised to learn that Manaus isn’t actually on the Amazon at all. Rather it lies on the Rio Negro, six kilometres from the point where that river meets the Solimões to form (as far as Brazilians are concerned) the Rio Amazonas. Just a few hundred metres away from the tranquil life on the rivers, the centre of Manaus perpetually buzzes with energy: always noisy, crowded and confused. Escaping from the frenzy is not easy, but there is the occasional quiet corner, and the sights of the port, markets, Opera House and some of the museums make up for the hectic pace in the downtown area. In the port and market areas, where the infamous Porto do Manaus smell is inescapable, pigs and chickens line the streets and there’s an atmosphere which seems unchanged in centuries. For the Amazon hinterland, Manaus has long symbolized “civilization”. Traditionally, this meant simply that it was the trading centre, where the hardships of life in the forest could be escaped temporarily and where manufactured commodities to make that life easier could be purchased – metal pots, steel knives, machetes and the like. Virgin jungle seems further from the city these days – just how far really depends on what you want “virgin forest” to mean – but there are still waterways and channels within a short river journey of Manaus where you can find dolphins, alligators, kingfishers and the impression, at least, that man has barely penetrated. Indeed, most visitors to Manaus rightly regard a river trip as an essential part of their stay; there is a variety of jungle tour and lodge options. Even if you can’t afford the time to disappear up the Amazon for days at a stretch, however, there are a number of sites around Manaus that make worthwhile day excursions, most notably the meeting of the waters of the yellow Rio Solimões and the black Rio Negro, and the lily-strewn Parque Ecólogico Janauary. History The name Manaus came originally from the Manau tribe which was encountered in this region by São Luís do Maranhão, exploring the area in 1616. He called the spot São Luís del Rio. But it was Francisco do Motta Falco who really founded Manaus by building up the settlement and encouraging others to remain there with him. The city you see today is primarily a product of the rubber boom and in particular the child of visionary state governor Eduardo Ribeiro, who from 1892 transformed Manaus into a major city. Under Ribeiro the Opera House was completed, and whole streets were wiped out in the process of laying down broad Parisian-style avenues, interspersed with Italian piazzas centred on splendid fountains. In 1899 Manaus was the first Brazilian city to have trolley buses and only the second to have electric lights in the streets. Around the turn of the nineteenth century Manaus was an opulent metropolis run by elegant people, who dressed and housed themselves as fashionably as their counterparts in any large European city. The rich constructed palaces and grandiose mansions; time was passed at elaborate entertainments, dances and concerts. But this heyday lasted barely thirty years, and by 1914 the rubber market was collapsing fast; Ribeiro himself had committed suicide in 1900. There was a second brief boost for Brazilian rubber during World War II, but today’s prosperity is largely due to the creation of a Free Trade Zone, the Zona Franca, in 1966. Over the following ten years the population doubled, from 250,000 to half a million, and many new industries moved in, especially electronics companies. An impressive new international airport was opened in 1976 and the floating port, supported on huge metal cylinders to cope with variations of as much as 14m in the level of the river, was modernized to cope with the new business. Today, with over three million inhabitants, Manaus is an aggressive commercial and industrial centre for an enormous region the Hong Kong of the Amazon. Over half of Brazil’s televisions are made here and electronic goods are around a third cheaper here than in the south. All of this helps encourage domestic tourism – Manaus airport is crowded with Brazilians going home with their arms laden with TVs, hi-fis, computers and fax machines. The City It’s not hard to get used to the layout of the city, and most things of interest huddle close to the water. From the floating port where the big ships dock, riverboat wharves extend round past the market, from one end of Rua dos Andradas to the other. The busiest commercial streets are immediately behind, extending up to the Avenida Sete de Setembro, with the cathedral marking one end of the downtown district, the Praça da Polícia the other. Beyond Avenida Sete de Setembro, towards the Opera House, it’s a bit calmer, with more offices and fewer shops. The busy Praça da Matriz by the cathedral is the main hub of city communications, with buses to local points around the city and suburbs; another good connection point for city buses and taxis is the east side of Avenida Getúlio Vargas just north of Avenida Sete de Setembro.

Day 13Port of Call Parintins Arrival 10:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Parintins stands out as the most hospitable cultural city in the region. The island where today stands Parintins was reached by portuguese Capitain J. Pedro Cordovil in 1796. Its people exhibit an artistic expression recognized worldwide due to their folkloric festival. The city has a population of 71.574, in an area of 7,069 square Km, and is located on the right bank of the Amazon River on the Island of Tupinambarana. The hot and humid climat, with a average temp. of 35ºC and 85% humidity, explain the mystery of the city destinated to success. The area´s relief consists of forests of floodplains and highlands, lakes, islands, and a small moutain ridge that forms the border between the states of Amazonas and Pará. Parintins distinguishes itself from orther cities because everything the city breathes culture, magic, beauty, and happiness year-round.

Day 14Port of Call Santarem Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

The city of Santarem is located between two great rivers, Amazon and the Tapajos. It is there that the meeting of the green-emerald waters of the Tapajós with brown waters of the Amazon occurs. From the moment they meet the rivers run together for a good time without mixing. 710 kilometers from Belém, Santarém offers a variety of tourist attractions. The access is easy. There the tourist can enjoy the beauty of the Alter-do-Chão beach, bathed by the crystal clear waters of the Tapajós. Fishing is one of the most popular attractions of Santarem, especially fishing the tucunare.

Day 15 Crossing the Equator
Day 15 Cruising
Day 15Amazon River

Overview

The Amazon River and Flooded Forests ecoregion contains an extremely high number of freshwater animal species, including two species of freshwater dolphins. The ecoregion is characterized by extensive forested areas that become flooded during each rainy season. These "flooded forests" in the Amazon region are the most extensive of this habitat type in the entire world. The cycle of flooding, and the annual regeneration that it produces, represent a globally outstanding ecological phenomenon. The entire Amazon basin contains the largest number of freshwater fish species in the world, estimated at more than 3,000 species. Every year the Amazon River rises more than 30 feet (9 m) and floods surrounding forests. These rising waters replenish nutrients in floodplain areas and regenerate floodplain lakes, floating meadows, and other seasonal habitats. Freshwater fish move into these flooded forests and often feed on the fruits that drop from the trees. The Amazon is the second longest river in the world (after the Nile), stretching 4,000 miles (6,400 kilometers). But it's the largest when it comes to volume. The Amazon contains 20 percent of the Earth's fresh water, which it carries from high up in the Andes Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean. Along the way, it picks up rich soil that flows into dozens of streams and small rivers. The Amazon Basin has two freshwater systems, the igapó (blackwater) and the varzea (whitewater). The varzea contains a large amount of minerals that fertilize land and help trees and other vegetation grow.

Day 16 Cruising
Day 17 Cruising
Day 18Port of Call St. George's/Grenada Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Saint George's or Saint George, town (1991 pop. 4,439), capital of Grenada, in the West Indies. A port town on a deep and beautiful harbor, it is the administrative headquarters of the country and a growing tourist center. Chief exports are cacao, nutmeg, and mace. St. George's was the capital of the former British colony of the Windward Islands.

Day 19 Cruising
Day 20Port of Call Oranjestad Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Oranjestad is the capital of the Dutch island of Aruba, in the Caribbean Sea. Near the marina, the 18th-century Fort Zoutman and the Willem III Tower, formerly a lighthouse, house the Historical Museum, which chronicles the island’s past. The Archaeological Museum displays indigenous artifacts dating back as far as 2500 B.C. Along the waterfront, L.G. Smith Boulevard is dotted with boutiques and shopping malls.

Day 21 Cruising
Day 22Port of Call Cristobal/Panama Arrival 5:00amDeparture 5:00am

Overview

Cristobal is a port town and county in Colon District, Colon Province, Panama with a population of 49,422 as of 2010. It is located on the western edge of Manzanillo Island, on the Atlantic side of the Panama Canal.

Day 22Panama Canal

Overview

The Panama Canal is an artificial 48-mile waterway in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean with the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a key conduit for international maritime trade. The Canal uses a system of locks -compartments with entrance and exit gates. The locks function as water lifts: they raise ships from sea level (the Pacific or the Atlantic) to the level of Gatun Lake (26 meters above sea level); ships then sail the channel through the Continental Divide. Each set of locks bears the name of the townsite where it was built: Gatun (on the Atlantic side), and Pedro Miguel and Miraflores (on the Pacific side). The lock chambers -steps-- are 33.53 meters wide by 304.8 meters long. The maximum dimensions of ships that can transit the Canal are: 32.3 meters in beam; draft -their depth reach- 12 meters in Tropical Fresh Water; and 294.1 meters long (depending on the type of ship). The water used to raise and lower vessels in each set of locks comes from Gatun Lake by gravity; it comes into the locks through a system of main culverts that extend under the lock chambers from the sidewalls and the center wall. The narrowest portion of the Canal is Culebra Cut, which extends from the north end of Pedro Miguel Locks to the south edge of Gatun Lake at Gamboa. This segment, approximately 13.7 kilometers long, is carved through the rock and shale of the Continental Divide. Ships from all parts of the world transit daily through the Panama Canal. Some 13 to 14 thousand vessels use the Canal every year. In fact, commercial transportation activities through the Canal represent approximately 5% of the world trade. The Canal has a work force of approximately 9 thousand employees and operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, providing transit service to vessels of all nations without discrimination.

Day 22Port of Call Balboa/Panama Arrival 7:00pmDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Balboa, town (1990 pop. 2,751), Colon prov., in the former Panama Canal Zone, on the Gulf of Panama. The port for Panama City, Balboa was the administrative headquarters of the Panama Canal Zone. It was also the site of a U.S. navy base (closed 1999). Note that the currency of Panama is also called Balboa.

Day 23 Cruising
Day 24Port of Call Puerto Quepos Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Puerto Quepos drapes itself across a tropical inlet surrounded by primary rainforest. The village center is a delightful six-block square of restaurants, bars, hotels, bakeries, art galleries and gift shops, all fronted by the main beach and sportfishing fleet. Quepos is growing quickly yet maintains many of its sleepy and humble beginnings. Quepeños are great celebrators of life and seem to make dancing in the streets a local pastime. The high season runs through the drier months of December to April and explodes during the Festival del Mar, a month long party held each February that features concerts, sporting events, parades and a street carnival with dancers from across the country. Quepos fills to the brim with families, surfers, backpackers, ecotourists, blissed-out scientists and gay jet-setters, all as colorful and intriguing as the flora and fauna surrounding the village. The ever-friendly locals take it all in stride, going out of their way to make sure everyone has a good time. Tourism is now the area's leading employer as Quepos evolves from its banana growing roots into a premier holiday destination. After the demise of the Quepoa Indians in the late 1800's, vast banana plantations were developed throughout the region. Bananas were shipped to world markets across the docks that now service the sportfishing fleet. In the 1980's bananas lost out to heartier African palms and their high quality palm oil. As Quepos diminished in importance as a banana port, it renewed itself as an ecotourism and sportfishing destination. World travelers are discovering the area, with many visitors purchasing homes and returning each year to enjoy the relaxing village lifestyle and natural beauty of nearby Manuel Antonio.

Day 25 Cruising
Day 26 Cruising
Day 27 Cruising
Day 28Port of Call Puerto Vallarta Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Puerto Vallarta is a resort town on Mexico’s Pacific coast, in Jalisco state. It is known for its beaches, water sports and nightlife scene. Its cobblestone center is home to the ornate Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe church, boutique shops and a range of restaurants and bars. El Malecón is a beachside promenade with contemporary sculptures, as well as bars, lounges and nightclubs.

Day 29 Cruising
Day 30 Cruising
Day 31 Cruising
Day 32 Cruising
Day 33 Cruising
Day 34 Cruising
Day 35Port of Call Hilo Arrival 7:00amDeparture 10:30pm

Overview

The Polynesians arrived in the Hilo area about 1100 A.C. They eventually inhabited the shores of Hilo Bay, farmed their crops, fished and traded their goods along the Wailuku River. In the late 1700’s, the days of King Kamehameha’s rule, Hilo was the center of political activity and social growth. It was the prime place for the King to build his army of ships designed for conquering the Hawaiian Islands. By 1791 native Hawaiians had traveled as far as the United States and China. The King befriended many of the foreigners who traveled to the islands. With such considerable traveling, the Hawaiian way of life soon became influenced by products ranging from iron to livestock to non-native seeds. Hilo became a stopping place for explorers, whaling ships, traders and those curious about active volcanoes. By the 1900’s, Hilo had grown into a commercial center. The sugar industry was booming, a number of wharves had been constructed, the breakwater was begun and a new railroad connected Hilo with other parts of the island. Then in 1946 – and again in 1960 – two destructive tsunamis swept Hilo’s Bayfront causing the relocation of Hilo’s government and commercial life. When the town was rebuilt, a large park and roadway were situated between the buildings and the shoreline to absorb future tidal waves. Besides being a rare surviving example of an Hawaiian plantation town, cultural diversity is one of Hilo’s special charms. The local term, “mixed plate”, describes well the impact made by Polynesians, Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese, Koreans, other Pacific Islanders and Europeans on Hilo’s mixed-race culture of today. All these ethnic groups blend in the faces of the people who give Hilo its charm. Its diverse shopping opportunities, its small scale and its friendliness makes Hilo the perfect town in which to linger just a little longer.

Day 36Port of Call Lahaina Arrival 8:00amDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

LAHAINA - Maui's first capital city once the center of whaling in the Pacific. Today it provides an amazing look into the past and one of the prime whale-watching destinations in Maui. Don't miss the splendor of this West coast gem. A Look Into the Past - In the early 1800s Lahaina was the capital of Hawaii and the center of activity where the royal family called home and a huge whaling industry was based. Today the royals and whaling are long gone but Lahaina still treats its guests like kings and queens and exists as one of the best whale-watching destinations in Hawaii. Visitors flock to Lahaina for a variety of reasons. The consistent warm sun and calm waters always make a vacation enjoyable and the historic attractions scattered throughout town are a definite draw. Don’t miss the Carthaginian, a replica of an 1870 whaling vessel that sits in dock near the center of town. The port of Lahaina was at one time filled with ships of this type when the town was a whaling hotspot. Next, stop off in the park and admire the natural beauty of the town’s impressive banyan tree, with its above ground roots and wide-reaching branches. On the northern edge of town at Puunoa Point is the beautiful Lahaina Jodo Mission, the home to the largest Great Buddha statue outside of Japan. Views of surrounding islands Molokai, Lanai, and Kaho’olawe are stunning—don’t miss it! If you’re interested in whale-watching, Lahaina is the place to be. During peak season, trips leave everyday to see humpback whales in their natural habitat. December to May is the best time of year to see the whales and in many cases visitors are guaranteed to see these magnificent creatures or the next trip is free. Lahaina is also home to beautiful beaches, warm water and plenty of shopping. Make sure to make it one of your stops when visiting Maui.

Day 37Port of Call Honolulu Arrival 7:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Anyone lucky enough to be going to Honolulu doesn't have to give a reason for going. They can just say, "We're going to Honolulu," and imagination will take care of the rest. Moreover, Honolulu can probably live up to and even surpass whatever we imagine. World-famous beaches and tropical weather set the scene for an amazing mix of Pacific cultures in this Hawaiian capital. There is a reason why Hawaii is consistently rated as one of the nation's top travel destinations; in fact, there are several of them. Waikiki Beach is the center of activity for Hawaii's biggest industry: tourism. This is one of the world's greatest resort playgrounds, featuring some of the most beautiful beaches and hotels in the world. Visitors from all over the world flock here to enjoy the sun, the sand and the incredible nightlife. Besides the beaches, visitors to Honolulu can take tours of the countryside surrounding the downtown area. These tours are amazing, bringing visitors to some of the most beautiful rainforests and volcanoes in the world. Animal and plant life are abundant, and the scenery is unsurpassed. A five-minute car ride from Honolulu brings visitors into some of Nature's most beautiful and awe-inspiring sights. Several museums, including the Bishop Museum, combine exhibits on Hawaiian natural history with lessons about history and culture of its many diverse peoples. The Waikiki Aquarium is the third oldest public aquarium in the United States, and it features many of Hawaii's most interesting sea animals. The Honolulu Zoo also features some of the unique mammals, birds, and reptiles that inhabit the forests just outside of the city. The history of Hawaii is very rich, as the islands have always attracted many different people. Visitors can tour the Iolani Palace, the residence of the last of the Hawaiian monarchs. They can also visit Honolulu's Chinatown, which is more authentic than many of its mainland counterparts. They can also visit the Arizona Memorial, commemorating the destruction of the battleship Arizona during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor that brought America into World War II. Honolulu exhibits the best of Hawaii in every way. From its famous beaches to its incredible natural preserves, this town has attracted millions of people from around the world. Many of those visitors stayed, helping to make Hawaii one of the most cosmopolitan and diverse places to visit in the United States. Anyone lucky enough to be going to Hawaii knows that he won't be disappointed.

Day 38 Cruising
Day 39 Cruising
Day 40 Cruising
Day 41 Crossing the International Dateline
Day 42Port of Call Majuro Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Majuro is the capital and largest city of the Republic of the Marshall Islands. It is also a large coral atoll of 64 islands in the Pacific Ocean. It forms a legislative district of the Ratak Chain of the Marshall Islands.

Day 43 Cruising
Day 44 Cruising
Day 45Port of Call Chuuk Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Chuuk Atoll, in the Caroline Islands, encompasses 15 large islands, 192 outer islands and 80 islets and has one of the largest lagoons in the world. It measures 85 kilometers at its widest point and encloses an area of 822 square miles. What lies beneath the blue waters is a submerged museum of World War 2 Wrecks, for there are more than sixty ships of the Japanese wartime fleet encrusted with coral lying at various depths. The lagoon has been declared a monument, and salvage and souvenir taking of relics is prohibited by law. Divers must obtain a permit before diving around the ships. Chuuk's district centre on Weno is where visitors can experience a taste of island life by visiting the local stores jammed with everything from kerosene stoves to ladies wear and handicrafts. Most restaurants in Chuuk provide a selection of American, Japanese and local foods as regular menu items. US dollars are used while traveler’s checks and currency can be changed at banks and at some hotels.

Day 46 Cruising
Day 47Port of Call Guam Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Guam, the largest and southernmost of the Mariana Islands chain, has a unique and complex cultural history. Located in the Western Pacific in the geographic region known as Micronesia, Guam is well known for its strategic military and economic position between Asia and the North American continent, but is less known for its remarkable history and resilient people. Inhabited for thousands of years archaeological evidence indicates that the Marianas Islands were one of the first places to be settled by seafaring peoples, possibly from Island Southeast Asia, over 4000 years ago. The Mariana Islands appear to have been continuously occupied by people who shared the same culture and language that eventually became known as Chamorro. Guam’s history is also one of multi-colonialism, with the last 400 years of Guam’s history marked by administrations of three different colonial powers: Spain, the United States and Japan. The ceding of Guam to the United States as an unincorporated territory after the Spanish-American War in 1898 introduced Chamorros to democratic principles of government and the modern American lifestyle, while keeping them subjects of a sometimes oppressive US Naval administration. Guam also had a unique position in World War II, when Japan invaded the island shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941. For the next three years, Guam was the only US territory occupied by Japanese forces until the Americans returned in 1944 to reclaim the island. The political maneuverings after World War II and the post war buildup led to even more expansion of US military interests in Guam and the rest of Micronesia, with Guam becoming a hub for economic and commercial development. The easing of military restrictions for entering Guam and the establishment of a local, civilian government, have made the island an ideal place for people from all over the world to visit, go to school, find jobs or pursue a variety of economic interests. Today, Guam has a diverse population that enjoys a rich, multicultural, modern and urban lifestyle, yet continues to carry the indigenous spirit, language and culture of its people.

Day 48Port of Call Saipan Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Saipan is the largest of the Northern Mariana Islands, a U.S. commonwealth in the Western Pacific. It’s characterized by sandy shores and mountainous landscapes, and has several championship golf courses. Its highest point is 1,555-ft. Mt. Tapochau, a limestone peak at the island's center. Close to the northern tip, Japanese memorials mark Banzai Cliff and Suicide Cliff, sites from the 1944 Battle of Saipan.

Day 49 Cruising
Day 50 Cruising
Day 51 Cruising
Day 52Port of Call Ishigaki-ko Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Harbor(s) - a haven or space of deep water so sheltered by the adjacent land as to afford a safe anchorage for ships

Day 53Port of Call Naha/Okinawa Arrival 8:00amDeparture 11:00pm

Overview

Naha is city and capital of Okinawa ken (prefecture), Japan. It lies on southwestern Okinawa Island, which is one of the Ryukyu Islands. Long the chief city of the archipelago, it contains the Sogen Temple, burial place of the rulers of the early Okinawa kingdom. The Shurei Gate is a fine example of Ryukyuan architecture. Naha was the seat of the post-World War II U.S. military and Okinawan governments and became the prefecture capital in 1972. Because of its deepwater port, Naha is the commercial centre of the Ryukyu Islands chain. Traditional handicraft industries produce porcelain, lacquer ware, dyed cloth, and the potent awamori liquor. The city is also the seat of the University of the Ryukyus (1950).

Day 54 Cruising
Day 55 Cruising
Day 56Port of Call Tokyo Arrival 8:00am

Overview

Describing Tokyo to someone who has never been here is a formidable task. After all, how do you describe a city that--as one of my friends visiting Tokyo for the first time put it--seems like it's part of another planet? To be sure, Tokyo is very different from Western capitals, but what really sets it apart is its people. Approximately 12 million people reside within Tokyo's 1,200,000,000 sq. km (800 sq. miles), and almost one-fourth of Japan's total population lives within commuting distance of the city. This translates into a crush of humanity that packs the subways, crowds the sidewalks, and fills the department stores beyond belief. In some parts of the city, the streets are as crowded at 3am as they are at 3pm. With its high-energy, visual overload, Tokyo makes even New York seem like a sleepy, laid-back town. And yet, despite its limited space for harmonious living, Tokyo remains one of the safest cities in the world, with remarkably little crime or violence. No matter how lost I may become, I know that people will go out of their way to help me. Hardworking, honest, and helpful to strangers, the Japanese are their country's greatest asset. With Tokyo so densely packed, it comes as no shock to learn that land here is more valuable than gold and that buildings are built practically on top of each other, shaped like pieces in a jigsaw puzzle to fit the existing plots of real estate. More than perhaps any other city in the world, Japan's capital is a concrete jungle, with a few parks but not many trees to break the monotony, and it stretches on and on as far as the eye can see. Fires, earthquakes, wars, the zeal for modernization, and the price of land have taken their toll on the city, eradicating almost all evidence of previous centuries. It's as though Tokyo was born only this morning, with all the messy aftermath of a city conceived without plan and interested only in the future. Thus, first-time visitors to Tokyo are almost invariably disappointed. They come expecting an exotic Asian city, but instead find a megalopolis Westernized to the point of drabness. Used to the grand edifices and monuments of Western cities, they look in vain for Tokyo's own monuments to its past--ancient temples, exquisite gardens, imperial palaces, or whatever else they've imagined. Instead they find what may be, quite arguably, one of the ugliest cities in the world. So, while Tokyo is one of my favorite cities, it's an appreciation that came only with time. When I first moved here, I was tormented by the unsettling feeling that I was somehow missing out on the "real" Tokyo. Even though I was living and working here, Tokyo seemed beyond my grasp, elusive, vague, and undefined. I felt that the meaning of the city was out there somewhere, if only I knew where to look. With time, I finally learned that I needn't look farther than my own front window. Tokyo has no center, but rather is made up of a series of small towns and neighborhoods clustered together, each with its own history, flavor, and atmosphere. There are narrow residential streets, ma-and-pa shops, fruit stands, and stores. There's the neighborhood tofu factory, the lunch-box stand, grocery shop, and the tiny police station, where the cops know the residents by name and patrol the area by bicycle. There are carefully pruned bonsai trees gracing sidewalks, women in kimono bowing and shuffling down streets, and wooden homes on impossibly narrow streets. Walk in the old downtown neighborhoods of Asakusa or Yanaka and you're worlds apart from the trendy quarters of Harajuku or the high-rises of Shinjuku. Neighborhoods like these make Tokyo lovable and livable. What's more, once visitors get to know Tokyo better, they learn that you can't judge Tokyo by what it looks like on the outside, for this is a city of interiors. Even those concrete monsters may house interiors that are fascinating in design and innovation. In the basement of that drab building could well be a restaurant with wooden beams, mud walls, and thatched ceiling, imported intact from a farmhouse in the Japan Alps; on its roof could be a small Shinto shrine, while the top floor could house a high-tech bar or a sophisticated French restaurant. And beneath Tokyo's concrete shell is a thriving cultural life left very much intact. In fact, if you're interested in Japan's performing arts as well as such diverse activities as the tea ceremony or sumo, Tokyo is your best bet for offering the most at any one time. Tokyo is also rich in museums and claims the largest repository of Japanese art in the world. It also gets my vote as the pop-art capital of the world; if you're into kitsch, you'll be in high heaven. I can't imagine being bored here, even for just a minute.

Day 57Port of Call TokyoDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Describing Tokyo to someone who has never been here is a formidable task. After all, how do you describe a city that--as one of my friends visiting Tokyo for the first time put it--seems like it's part of another planet? To be sure, Tokyo is very different from Western capitals, but what really sets it apart is its people. Approximately 12 million people reside within Tokyo's 1,200,000,000 sq. km (800 sq. miles), and almost one-fourth of Japan's total population lives within commuting distance of the city. This translates into a crush of humanity that packs the subways, crowds the sidewalks, and fills the department stores beyond belief. In some parts of the city, the streets are as crowded at 3am as they are at 3pm. With its high-energy, visual overload, Tokyo makes even New York seem like a sleepy, laid-back town. And yet, despite its limited space for harmonious living, Tokyo remains one of the safest cities in the world, with remarkably little crime or violence. No matter how lost I may become, I know that people will go out of their way to help me. Hardworking, honest, and helpful to strangers, the Japanese are their country's greatest asset. With Tokyo so densely packed, it comes as no shock to learn that land here is more valuable than gold and that buildings are built practically on top of each other, shaped like pieces in a jigsaw puzzle to fit the existing plots of real estate. More than perhaps any other city in the world, Japan's capital is a concrete jungle, with a few parks but not many trees to break the monotony, and it stretches on and on as far as the eye can see. Fires, earthquakes, wars, the zeal for modernization, and the price of land have taken their toll on the city, eradicating almost all evidence of previous centuries. It's as though Tokyo was born only this morning, with all the messy aftermath of a city conceived without plan and interested only in the future. Thus, first-time visitors to Tokyo are almost invariably disappointed. They come expecting an exotic Asian city, but instead find a megalopolis Westernized to the point of drabness. Used to the grand edifices and monuments of Western cities, they look in vain for Tokyo's own monuments to its past--ancient temples, exquisite gardens, imperial palaces, or whatever else they've imagined. Instead they find what may be, quite arguably, one of the ugliest cities in the world. So, while Tokyo is one of my favorite cities, it's an appreciation that came only with time. When I first moved here, I was tormented by the unsettling feeling that I was somehow missing out on the "real" Tokyo. Even though I was living and working here, Tokyo seemed beyond my grasp, elusive, vague, and undefined. I felt that the meaning of the city was out there somewhere, if only I knew where to look. With time, I finally learned that I needn't look farther than my own front window. Tokyo has no center, but rather is made up of a series of small towns and neighborhoods clustered together, each with its own history, flavor, and atmosphere. There are narrow residential streets, ma-and-pa shops, fruit stands, and stores. There's the neighborhood tofu factory, the lunch-box stand, grocery shop, and the tiny police station, where the cops know the residents by name and patrol the area by bicycle. There are carefully pruned bonsai trees gracing sidewalks, women in kimono bowing and shuffling down streets, and wooden homes on impossibly narrow streets. Walk in the old downtown neighborhoods of Asakusa or Yanaka and you're worlds apart from the trendy quarters of Harajuku or the high-rises of Shinjuku. Neighborhoods like these make Tokyo lovable and livable. What's more, once visitors get to know Tokyo better, they learn that you can't judge Tokyo by what it looks like on the outside, for this is a city of interiors. Even those concrete monsters may house interiors that are fascinating in design and innovation. In the basement of that drab building could well be a restaurant with wooden beams, mud walls, and thatched ceiling, imported intact from a farmhouse in the Japan Alps; on its roof could be a small Shinto shrine, while the top floor could house a high-tech bar or a sophisticated French restaurant. And beneath Tokyo's concrete shell is a thriving cultural life left very much intact. In fact, if you're interested in Japan's performing arts as well as such diverse activities as the tea ceremony or sumo, Tokyo is your best bet for offering the most at any one time. Tokyo is also rich in museums and claims the largest repository of Japanese art in the world. It also gets my vote as the pop-art capital of the world; if you're into kitsch, you'll be in high heaven. I can't imagine being bored here, even for just a minute.

Day 58Port of Call Shimizu Arrival 7:00amDeparture 2:00pm

Overview

Blessed with a mild climate throughout the year, Shimizu is known for producing mandarin oranges, tea, and strawberries. On the coast, there is a pine-tree grove on a sand spit called Miho no Matsubara and which is often mentioned in legends. From the small mountain called Nihondaira tourists can enjoy a superb view of Mt. Fuji and the light-filled city at night. Picking strawberries during the winter and spring months is a popular pastime.

Day 59Port of Call Kobe Arrival 8:00am

Overview

Kobe lies on the south coast of southwestern Honshu Island, on Osaka Bay, near the city of Osaka. Behind the narrow coastal site of the city are mountains on which suburban residences and hotels have been built. Hyogo, which is now part of Kobe, had for centuries been a major Japanese port trading with China and Korea and benefited in the 1860s, when Japan was re-opened to foreign trade. Since the 1890s several adjoining cities, including Hyogo, have been absorbed by Kobe. Following the 1995 earthquake tragedy, Kobe Phoenix Plaza became a help centre and now features a collection of photographs that reveal the devastating force of the earthquake . Kitano-cho is Kobe’s former foreigner’s quarter and features restored buildings now used as museums. boutiques and restaurants. The district has a synagogue, a mosque, and a Russian Orthodox cathedral. Meriken Park houses the Maritime Museum and nearby Kobe Tower. The city has Christian churches, Shinto and Buddhist temples and shrines, two famous statues of Buddha, a fine arts museum, and a municipal museum with a collection on Western cultural contact. Nearby is the city of Himeji and the stunning Himeji Castle (Shirasagi-jo), begun in the 14th century and now designated a National Treasure of Japan and UNESCO World Heritage Site. From here tourists can also visit Osaka, Kyoto, Nara and Sorakuen Garden.

Day 60Port of Call KobeDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Kobe lies on the south coast of southwestern Honshu Island, on Osaka Bay, near the city of Osaka. Behind the narrow coastal site of the city are mountains on which suburban residences and hotels have been built. Hyogo, which is now part of Kobe, had for centuries been a major Japanese port trading with China and Korea and benefited in the 1860s, when Japan was re-opened to foreign trade. Since the 1890s several adjoining cities, including Hyogo, have been absorbed by Kobe. Following the 1995 earthquake tragedy, Kobe Phoenix Plaza became a help centre and now features a collection of photographs that reveal the devastating force of the earthquake . Kitano-cho is Kobe’s former foreigner’s quarter and features restored buildings now used as museums. boutiques and restaurants. The district has a synagogue, a mosque, and a Russian Orthodox cathedral. Meriken Park houses the Maritime Museum and nearby Kobe Tower. The city has Christian churches, Shinto and Buddhist temples and shrines, two famous statues of Buddha, a fine arts museum, and a municipal museum with a collection on Western cultural contact. Nearby is the city of Himeji and the stunning Himeji Castle (Shirasagi-jo), begun in the 14th century and now designated a National Treasure of Japan and UNESCO World Heritage Site. From here tourists can also visit Osaka, Kyoto, Nara and Sorakuen Garden.

Day 61Kanmon Strait

Overview

The Kanmon Strait is the stretch of water separating two of Japan's four main islands. On the Honshu side of the water is Shimonoseki and on the Kyushu side is Moji port, now part of Kitakyushu City. The Kanmon Strait can be traversed in a number of ways, the oldest of which is the ferry. There is also a bridge which carries an expressway. By far the most used method is the Kanmon Tunnel which carries the Shinkansen, trains, cars and even pedestrians.

Day 62Port of Call Hakata/Fukuoka Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Hakata-ku is a ward of the city of Fukuoka in Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan. Many of Fukuoka Prefecture and Fukuoka City's principal government, commercial, retail and entertainment establishments are located in the district.

Day 63 Cruising
Day 64Port of Call Dalian Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Located at the southern tip of Liaoning Peninsula. Dalian is one of the most important seaports as well as industrial, trading, tourist and information cities in China.Dalian has a pleasant climate with the clearly demarcated seasons, cool summers, and warm winters. Dalian abounds with natural resources. It is an important base of fruit and water product production in China. Dalian is also the "home of track and fields" and the famous "soccer city" in China. The flourishing coastal city of Dalian is the major port for China's north-east province and is a magnet for foreign investors. A major industrial producer in its own right, Dalian is connected by pipeline to the Daqing oil field.Thriving ship building and chemical industries have also been developed. The port has a wealth of handicraft factories whose products include glassware and shell mosaics. Other attractions include beaches, parks, gardens and a zoo.

Day 65Port of Call Xingang Arrival 8:00am

Overview

Xingang, is a port on the coast of the Gulf of Bo Hai off the Yellow Sea in northeastern China. It is the gateway to Beijing, the capital of China.It has a population of 32,000 and an area of 66.05 square kilometres.

Day 66Port of Call XingangDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Xingang, is a port on the coast of the Gulf of Bo Hai off the Yellow Sea in northeastern China. It is the gateway to Beijing, the capital of China.It has a population of 32,000 and an area of 66.05 square kilometres.

Day 67 Cruising
Day 68 Cruising
Day 69Port of Call Shanghai Arrival 8:00am

Overview

Shanghai, on China’s central coast, is the country's biggest city and a global financial hub. Its heart is the Bund, a famed waterfront promenade lined with colonial-era buildings. Across the Huangpu River rises the Pudong district’s futuristic skyline, including 632m Shanghai Tower and the Oriental Pearl TV Tower, with distinctive pink spheres. Sprawling Yu Garden has traditional pavilions, towers and ponds.

Day 70Port of Call ShanghaiDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Shanghai, on China’s central coast, is the country's biggest city and a global financial hub. Its heart is the Bund, a famed waterfront promenade lined with colonial-era buildings. Across the Huangpu River rises the Pudong district’s futuristic skyline, including 632m Shanghai Tower and the Oriental Pearl TV Tower, with distinctive pink spheres. Sprawling Yu Garden has traditional pavilions, towers and ponds.

Day 71 Cruising
Day 72 Cruising
Day 73Port of Call Hong Kong Arrival 8:00am

Overview

Hong Kong is a place of contrasts. Sleek, glassy skyscrapers shine above Old World markets where chicken feet and dried squid are displayed for sale. Archaic wooden boats bob past sleek cruise liners. Subway stations and expressway interchanges dot a landscape cluttered with Rolls Royces and rickshaws. Hong Kong Island was ceded to Britain in 1842 when those serving the British crown attacked the island. Though it was deeded back to China in 1997, Hong Kong enjoys a high degree of autonomy, especially in its economy and municipal government. Hong Kong is one of the most unique Chinese cities in the world. The 417-square mile island off the coast of China offers visitors a slice of authentic Chinese culture with all the amenities of home. A modern metropolis teeming with eastern and western influences, Hong Kong is the world's third-largest financial center, the so-called “Wall Street of Asia,” and a shopping gold mine. Shopping? Yes indeed. Hong Kong is a duty-free port and the world's leading exporter of toys, garments, watches, and electronics. As a result, the vast majority of the 10 million annual visitors come with an empty suitcase that they fill up after visiting the malls, street bazaars (Stanley Market is world famous), textile and tailor shops, and jade and electronic stores. Those willing to look beyond the bargain-basement prices will find that Hong Kong is more than the world’s largest department store – it’s a cultural Mecca with wining and dining, museums, and historic attractions. Be sure to ride the world famous Star Ferry across the harbor to Hong Kong Island, admire the mansions on Repulse Bay, drop in to see the temples on Cat Street, visit the fishing boats and villages in Aberdeen, and take a tram ride up to Victoria Peak (the island’s highest peak sitting 1,308-feet above the city) for a stunning panoramic view. If you have time to go further, travel to Macau, a former Portuguese colony with a casino, and the New Territories of China, a Hong Kong bedroom community that “sleeps” near China’s border.

Day 74Port of Call Hong KongDeparture 3:30pm

Overview

Hong Kong is a place of contrasts. Sleek, glassy skyscrapers shine above Old World markets where chicken feet and dried squid are displayed for sale. Archaic wooden boats bob past sleek cruise liners. Subway stations and expressway interchanges dot a landscape cluttered with Rolls Royces and rickshaws. Hong Kong Island was ceded to Britain in 1842 when those serving the British crown attacked the island. Though it was deeded back to China in 1997, Hong Kong enjoys a high degree of autonomy, especially in its economy and municipal government. Hong Kong is one of the most unique Chinese cities in the world. The 417-square mile island off the coast of China offers visitors a slice of authentic Chinese culture with all the amenities of home. A modern metropolis teeming with eastern and western influences, Hong Kong is the world's third-largest financial center, the so-called “Wall Street of Asia,” and a shopping gold mine. Shopping? Yes indeed. Hong Kong is a duty-free port and the world's leading exporter of toys, garments, watches, and electronics. As a result, the vast majority of the 10 million annual visitors come with an empty suitcase that they fill up after visiting the malls, street bazaars (Stanley Market is world famous), textile and tailor shops, and jade and electronic stores. Those willing to look beyond the bargain-basement prices will find that Hong Kong is more than the world’s largest department store – it’s a cultural Mecca with wining and dining, museums, and historic attractions. Be sure to ride the world famous Star Ferry across the harbor to Hong Kong Island, admire the mansions on Repulse Bay, drop in to see the temples on Cat Street, visit the fishing boats and villages in Aberdeen, and take a tram ride up to Victoria Peak (the island’s highest peak sitting 1,308-feet above the city) for a stunning panoramic view. If you have time to go further, travel to Macau, a former Portuguese colony with a casino, and the New Territories of China, a Hong Kong bedroom community that “sleeps” near China’s border.

Day 75 Cruising
Day 76Port of Call Da Nang Arrival 8:00amDeparture 11:00pm

Overview

Da Nang is a major port city in the South Central Coast of Vietnam, on the coast of the South China Sea at the mouth of the Han River. It is the commercial and educational center of Central Vietnam; its well-sheltered, easily accessible port and its location on the path of the North-South Railway also makes it a hub for transportation. It is located within 100 km of several UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The city was also known as Tourane or Turon during the French colonization of Vietnam.

Day 77 Cruising
Day 78Port of Call Phu My Arrival 6:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Phu My is a town in Tan Thanh District, Ba Ria–Vung Tau Province. This town is home to heavy industrial parks. Industries here include: electricity, fertilizer, steel production and deepwater ports activities.

Day 79 Cruising
Day 80Port of Call Singapore Arrival 8:00am

Overview

Though physically small, Singapore is an economic giant. It has been Southeast Asia's most modern city for over a century. The city blends Malay, Chinese, Arab, Indian and English cultures and religions. Its unique ethnic tapestry affords visitors a wide array of sightseeing and culinary opportunities from which to choose. A full calendar of traditional festivals and holidays celebrated throughout the year adds to its cultural appeal. In addition, Singapore offers luxury hotels, delectable cuisine and great shopping! Located at the tip of the Malay Peninsula, Singapore's tropical climate welcomes both leisure and business travelers year round. The island republic's excellent infrastructure enables visitors to enjoy its many sites and attractions in a safe, clean and green environment. Award winning Changi Airport provides airlinks to major cities around the world. The train and subway systems are clean, fast and efficient. In addition, its state-of-the-art cruise terminal has established Singapore as one of the premier cruising centers of South East Asia and an exciting port of call on any Asian cruise itinerary. In the city, there is no need for a car. Public transportation is excellent and walking is a good way to explore the city . All major attractions are also accessible by tour bus. Since the city is only 60 miles (100k) from the equator, the tropical temperatures do not vary much. Rainfall is fairly evenly distributed through the year. No matter when you choose to visit, warm weather will be abundantly available. The visitor is struck immediately by Singapore's abundance of parks, nature reserves, and lush, tropical greenery. Singapore's progress over the past three decades has been remarkable, yet the island has not been overwhelmed by development. Visitors will discover a wealth of historical treasures from the past, in the beauty of older buildings, values and traditions that have survived in the face of profound social and geographical change. Lacking any noteworthy natural resources, Singapore's early prosperity was based on a vigorous free trade policy, put in place in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles first established it as a British trading post. Later, mass industrialization bolstered the economy, and today the state boasts the world's second busiest port after Rotterdam, minimal unemployment, and a super efficient infrastructure. Almost the entire population lives in upscale new apartments, and the average per capita income is over US$12,000. Singapore is a clean, safe place to visit, its amenities are second to none and its public places are smoke-free and hygienic. Forming the core of downtown Singapore is the Colonial District. Each surrounding enclave has its own distinct flavor, from the aromatic spice stores of Little India, to the tumbledown backstreets of Chinatown, where it is still possible to find calligraphers and fortune tellers, or the Arab Quarter, whose cluttered stores sell fine cloths and silks. North of the city, are two nature preserves, Bukit Timah and the Central Catchment Area, along with the splendid Singapore Zoological Gardens. The east coast features good seafood restaurants set on long stretches of sandy beach. In addition there are over fifty islands and islets within Singaporean waters, all of which can be reached with varying degrees of ease. Day trips are popular to Sentosa, the island amusement arcade which is linked to the south coast by a short causeway and cable car. Music, theater, nightlife: all are abundant in this remarkable city. Singapore used to be considered a "stop over" on the way to larger Asian cities. This is no longer true! Visitors seek out Singapore for business and finance and also for a fascinating and satisfying vacation for the whole family. Strategically located at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula sixty miles from the equator, Singapore has for centuries been a crossroads between East and West. Chinese traders en route to India had navigated its waters from at least the 5th century. In the 14th century it was part of the powerful Vijayan Empire and was known as Tenmasek or Sea Town. Legend has it that it was renamed Singa Pura or Lion City after a visiting Sumatran prince saw an animal he mistook for a lion, an animal considered a good omen. Modern Singapore came into being in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles claimed what was then a small fishing village as a regional base for the East India Company. The island's natural harbor and location made it an ideal site for a trading post serving British trade interests between China, the Malay world and India. Singapore flourished as its free trade policy attracted merchants and residents from all over the world. Raffles initiated a town plan which included leveling one hill to form a new commercial district (now Raffles Place) and constructing government buildings around another hill (now called Fort Canning Hill). The British plan also involved separating the population according to ethnic categories with Europeans, Indians, Chinese and Malays each living and working in their own distinct quarters of the city. Revenues soared in ensuing years from the production of opium and rubber. Millionaires were made overnight. Immigration rose steadily. The island became Britain's strategic defense base in the Far East but fell to the Japanese in 1942. After the world war ended in 1945, Singapore became a crown colony. It gained self governing status in 1959 and independence in 1965 when it became part of the new state of Malaysia which united Malaya with Singapore, Sabah, and Sarawak. The alliance did not last. Singapore was used to being on its own, and within two years the island set up its own stable government and became known as the Republic of Singapore. Under Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew's leadership, Singapore continued to strengthen its infrastructure and its industrial base. Housing and urban renovation kept pace with population growth. The areas of health and education are strong. Singapore's leaders have also brought order and progress through strict regulation of social behavior. Smoking in public was banned, as was gum chewing. High economic growth rates have supported political stability. Singapore is the world's second busiest seaport, has an airport served by over 50 major airlines. It has state of the art communication and mass transit systems. It is Asia's premier center for finance and business and the world's third largest oil refining center. Over 7 million visit the tiny island every year.

Day 81Port of Call SingaporeDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Though physically small, Singapore is an economic giant. It has been Southeast Asia's most modern city for over a century. The city blends Malay, Chinese, Arab, Indian and English cultures and religions. Its unique ethnic tapestry affords visitors a wide array of sightseeing and culinary opportunities from which to choose. A full calendar of traditional festivals and holidays celebrated throughout the year adds to its cultural appeal. In addition, Singapore offers luxury hotels, delectable cuisine and great shopping! Located at the tip of the Malay Peninsula, Singapore's tropical climate welcomes both leisure and business travelers year round. The island republic's excellent infrastructure enables visitors to enjoy its many sites and attractions in a safe, clean and green environment. Award winning Changi Airport provides airlinks to major cities around the world. The train and subway systems are clean, fast and efficient. In addition, its state-of-the-art cruise terminal has established Singapore as one of the premier cruising centers of South East Asia and an exciting port of call on any Asian cruise itinerary. In the city, there is no need for a car. Public transportation is excellent and walking is a good way to explore the city . All major attractions are also accessible by tour bus. Since the city is only 60 miles (100k) from the equator, the tropical temperatures do not vary much. Rainfall is fairly evenly distributed through the year. No matter when you choose to visit, warm weather will be abundantly available. The visitor is struck immediately by Singapore's abundance of parks, nature reserves, and lush, tropical greenery. Singapore's progress over the past three decades has been remarkable, yet the island has not been overwhelmed by development. Visitors will discover a wealth of historical treasures from the past, in the beauty of older buildings, values and traditions that have survived in the face of profound social and geographical change. Lacking any noteworthy natural resources, Singapore's early prosperity was based on a vigorous free trade policy, put in place in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles first established it as a British trading post. Later, mass industrialization bolstered the economy, and today the state boasts the world's second busiest port after Rotterdam, minimal unemployment, and a super efficient infrastructure. Almost the entire population lives in upscale new apartments, and the average per capita income is over US$12,000. Singapore is a clean, safe place to visit, its amenities are second to none and its public places are smoke-free and hygienic. Forming the core of downtown Singapore is the Colonial District. Each surrounding enclave has its own distinct flavor, from the aromatic spice stores of Little India, to the tumbledown backstreets of Chinatown, where it is still possible to find calligraphers and fortune tellers, or the Arab Quarter, whose cluttered stores sell fine cloths and silks. North of the city, are two nature preserves, Bukit Timah and the Central Catchment Area, along with the splendid Singapore Zoological Gardens. The east coast features good seafood restaurants set on long stretches of sandy beach. In addition there are over fifty islands and islets within Singaporean waters, all of which can be reached with varying degrees of ease. Day trips are popular to Sentosa, the island amusement arcade which is linked to the south coast by a short causeway and cable car. Music, theater, nightlife: all are abundant in this remarkable city. Singapore used to be considered a "stop over" on the way to larger Asian cities. This is no longer true! Visitors seek out Singapore for business and finance and also for a fascinating and satisfying vacation for the whole family. Strategically located at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula sixty miles from the equator, Singapore has for centuries been a crossroads between East and West. Chinese traders en route to India had navigated its waters from at least the 5th century. In the 14th century it was part of the powerful Vijayan Empire and was known as Tenmasek or Sea Town. Legend has it that it was renamed Singa Pura or Lion City after a visiting Sumatran prince saw an animal he mistook for a lion, an animal considered a good omen. Modern Singapore came into being in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles claimed what was then a small fishing village as a regional base for the East India Company. The island's natural harbor and location made it an ideal site for a trading post serving British trade interests between China, the Malay world and India. Singapore flourished as its free trade policy attracted merchants and residents from all over the world. Raffles initiated a town plan which included leveling one hill to form a new commercial district (now Raffles Place) and constructing government buildings around another hill (now called Fort Canning Hill). The British plan also involved separating the population according to ethnic categories with Europeans, Indians, Chinese and Malays each living and working in their own distinct quarters of the city. Revenues soared in ensuing years from the production of opium and rubber. Millionaires were made overnight. Immigration rose steadily. The island became Britain's strategic defense base in the Far East but fell to the Japanese in 1942. After the world war ended in 1945, Singapore became a crown colony. It gained self governing status in 1959 and independence in 1965 when it became part of the new state of Malaysia which united Malaya with Singapore, Sabah, and Sarawak. The alliance did not last. Singapore was used to being on its own, and within two years the island set up its own stable government and became known as the Republic of Singapore. Under Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew's leadership, Singapore continued to strengthen its infrastructure and its industrial base. Housing and urban renovation kept pace with population growth. The areas of health and education are strong. Singapore's leaders have also brought order and progress through strict regulation of social behavior. Smoking in public was banned, as was gum chewing. High economic growth rates have supported political stability. Singapore is the world's second busiest seaport, has an airport served by over 50 major airlines. It has state of the art communication and mass transit systems. It is Asia's premier center for finance and business and the world's third largest oil refining center. Over 7 million visit the tiny island every year.

Day 82 Cruising
Day 83 Cruising
Day 84 Cruising
Day 85Port of Call Colombo Arrival 8:00amDeparture 11:00pm

Overview

Colombo, the capital of Sri Lanka, has a long history as a port on ancient east-west trade routes, ruled successively by the Portuguese, Dutch and British. That heritage is reflected in its its architecture, mixing colonial buildings with high-rises and shopping malls. The imposing Colombo National Museum, dedicated to Sri Lankan history, borders sprawling Viharamahadevi Park and its giant Buddha.

Day 86 Cruising
Day 87 Cruising
Day 88Port of Call Mumbai Arrival 6:00am

Overview

Welcome to the city of merry making Mumbai formerly known as Bombay. The capital of Maharashtra lies on the wonderful west coast of India. The city was named after the local deity, Mumba Devi. The temple dedicated to the goddess still exists. Mumbai was till recent days known as Bombay owing to the Portuguese rulers believed the name of the city to be “Bom Baim” or the Good Bay. The city boasts of a natural harbor that was developed under the imperial rule. Mumbai is home to people of diverse castes, creeds, colors and cultures is an amalgamation of seven islands namely, Colaba, Mahim, Mazgaon, Parel, Worli, Girgaun and Dongri. The group of seven islands was amalgamated way back in the year 1862. Further the reclamation of land from the sea has brought areas like the Churchgate and Nariman Point into existence. Mumbai has been the Wall Street for all the businessmen in India. The film capital with its hip and hop has been the Hollywood to all the Indian stargazers. The port city of Mumbai handles a major chunk of the maritime trade in India. Right from the Victoria Terminus to the Juhu beach the city is full of treasures. People from various places come to the city of dreams. The inborn desire to become an actor or simply be successful in life draws people to the magnetic Mumbai. The biggest of industries and the largest of slums are all found Mumbai. Visit Mumbai making waves with its business tycoons and cool trends in the fashion industry. The city is not only home to the world’s largest film industry but also has architectural landmarks both Victorian as well as Indian heritage. Om your holiday at Mumbai you must unravel the treasures of the beaches, hills and the caves. The bustling bazaars Kalbadevi and Bhuleshwar, north of Crawford market are highlighted with the Mangaldas Market, Zaveri Bazaar, and Chor Bazaar. The life and styles of the people are extremes. The Bhelpuri on the Chowpatty is enjoyed as much as the pizza at any of the fast food restaurants. The balloon sellers, pigeon feeds, buggy rides and snacks take up the evenings at Mumbai. You name it and Mumbai has it for you From Parsi dhansaak to Gujarati thalis, and Muslim kebabs to Goan vindaloos, Mumbai caters to individual needs of all kinds. Ask for Indian, Chinese, Italian or Mexican the chefs at Mumbai will delight you with all. From the roadside stalls to the 5 star hotels, the food and facilities can be opted for as per the requirements and the budget of the traveler. On the regular days sip the any of the many pubs and shake a leg at the various discotheques.Mumbai celebrates the year through with the ear-splitting processions and immersion of the idol of the elephant headed God at Ganesh Chaturthi to the dandiya during the navratri days. Let the breeze from the Arabian Sea sweep you.

Day 89Port of Call MumbaiDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Welcome to the city of merry making Mumbai formerly known as Bombay. The capital of Maharashtra lies on the wonderful west coast of India. The city was named after the local deity, Mumba Devi. The temple dedicated to the goddess still exists. Mumbai was till recent days known as Bombay owing to the Portuguese rulers believed the name of the city to be “Bom Baim” or the Good Bay. The city boasts of a natural harbor that was developed under the imperial rule. Mumbai is home to people of diverse castes, creeds, colors and cultures is an amalgamation of seven islands namely, Colaba, Mahim, Mazgaon, Parel, Worli, Girgaun and Dongri. The group of seven islands was amalgamated way back in the year 1862. Further the reclamation of land from the sea has brought areas like the Churchgate and Nariman Point into existence. Mumbai has been the Wall Street for all the businessmen in India. The film capital with its hip and hop has been the Hollywood to all the Indian stargazers. The port city of Mumbai handles a major chunk of the maritime trade in India. Right from the Victoria Terminus to the Juhu beach the city is full of treasures. People from various places come to the city of dreams. The inborn desire to become an actor or simply be successful in life draws people to the magnetic Mumbai. The biggest of industries and the largest of slums are all found Mumbai. Visit Mumbai making waves with its business tycoons and cool trends in the fashion industry. The city is not only home to the world’s largest film industry but also has architectural landmarks both Victorian as well as Indian heritage. Om your holiday at Mumbai you must unravel the treasures of the beaches, hills and the caves. The bustling bazaars Kalbadevi and Bhuleshwar, north of Crawford market are highlighted with the Mangaldas Market, Zaveri Bazaar, and Chor Bazaar. The life and styles of the people are extremes. The Bhelpuri on the Chowpatty is enjoyed as much as the pizza at any of the fast food restaurants. The balloon sellers, pigeon feeds, buggy rides and snacks take up the evenings at Mumbai. You name it and Mumbai has it for you From Parsi dhansaak to Gujarati thalis, and Muslim kebabs to Goan vindaloos, Mumbai caters to individual needs of all kinds. Ask for Indian, Chinese, Italian or Mexican the chefs at Mumbai will delight you with all. From the roadside stalls to the 5 star hotels, the food and facilities can be opted for as per the requirements and the budget of the traveler. On the regular days sip the any of the many pubs and shake a leg at the various discotheques.Mumbai celebrates the year through with the ear-splitting processions and immersion of the idol of the elephant headed God at Ganesh Chaturthi to the dandiya during the navratri days. Let the breeze from the Arabian Sea sweep you.

Day 90 Cruising
Day 91 Cruising
Day 92Port of Call Fujayrah Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Khor Fakkan is a town on the Gulf of Oman, in the United Arab Emirates. It centers on Khor Fakkan Bay, home to the curved Khor Fakkan Beach and a deep-sea port. A promenade runs along the beachfront, against the backdrop of the dramatic Hajar Mountains. Archaeological sites include ancient graves and a ruined Portuguese fort. West of town is Wadi Wurayah, a biodiverse mountain area with waterfalls and natural pools.

Day 93Port of Call Dubai Arrival 7:00amDeparture 11:00pm

Overview

Dubai is located on the Eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula, in the south west corner of the Arabian Gulf. It is extremely well known for its warm hospitality and rich cultural heritage, and the Emirati people are welcoming and generous in their approach to visitors. With year-round sunshine, intriguing deserts, beautiful beaches, luxurious hotels and shopping malls, fascinating heritage attractions and a thriving business community, Dubai receives millions of leisure and business visitors each year from around the world. The local currency is the dirham, which is pegged at AED 3.67 to 1 US dollar. Dubai is tolerant and cosmopolitan and all visitors are welcome. However, Islam is a way of life in the city, and therefore tourists should adopt a certain level of cultural and religious sensitivity for the duration of their stay.

Day 94Port of Call Abu Dhabi Arrival 8:00amDeparture 11:00pm

Overview

Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates, sits off the mainland on an island in the Persian (Arabian) Gulf. Its focus on oil exports and commerce is reflected by the skyline’s modern towers and shopping megacenters such as Abu Dhabi and Marina malls. Beneath white-marble domes, the vast Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque features an immense Persian carpet, crystal chandeliers and capacity for 41,000 worshipers.

Day 95 Cruising
Day 96Port of Call Muscat Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Oman's capital enchants visitors in a way that no other city in the Gulf can even begin to match. Maybe it's because Muscat doesn't have that slightly artificial feel which typifies so much of the rest of the region. Muscat, Mutrah and Ruwi are the capital's core districts. Muscat, the old port area, is the site of the sultan's main palace and a fascinating place to wander around, but it has few shops and, except for the old city walls, it isn't exactly bursting with sights. Mutrah, 3km (2mi) north-west of Muscat, is the main trading and residential port area. A few kilometres inland from Muscat and Mutrah lies Ruwi, the capital's modern commercial district. There are three forts in Muscat, all of which took on their more or less present form in the 1580s during the Portuguese occupation of Muscat. Mutrah Fort sits on a hill while Jalali and Mirani forts guard the entrance to Muscat. All of the forts are still used by the police and/or military and are closed to the public, but it's okay to photograph them. Muscat has by far the best aquarium in the Gulf. All of the specimens on display are native to Omani waters and most are accompanied by thorough descriptions in English. The Oman Museum, in the Medinat Qaboos, west of Muscat, covers the entire sweep of Oman's 5000-year history. There are also a displays on shipbuilding, Islam and fort architecture. In Ruwi, the National Museum has sparkling displays on Omani silverwork, and the Sultan's Armed Forces Museum, in the Bait al-Falaj fort, has an excellent outline of Omani history. You could easily spend a day in Mutrah. Start off early at the fish market, then head down to the souk for a cup of tea and a wander around the most interesting bazaar in Arabia. To the east, a restored watchtower looks out over Mutrah. The climb is steep and involves more than 100 steps, but the view from the top is worth it. Muscat's best value rooms are along the Mutrah Corniche. If you spend only a little above rock-bottom you'll get good views and great atmosphere. There are several small restaurants along the Corniche, too, and several good bets in Ruwi .

Day 97 Cruising
Day 98Port of Call Salalah Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Salalah is the capital and largest city of the southern Omani governorate of Dhofar. Its population in 2009 was about 197,169. Salalah is the second-largest city in the Sultanate of Oman, and the largest city in the Dhofar Province. Salalah is the birthplace of the current sultan, Qaboos bin Said. Salalah attracts many people from other parts of Oman and the Persian Gulf region during the monsoon/khareef season, which spans from July to September. The climate of the region and the monsoon allows the city to grow some vegetables and fruits like coconut and bananas. There are many gardens within the city where these vegetables and fruits grow.

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Day 103Port of Call Al Aqaba Arrival 7:00am

Overview

Aqaba is a Jordanian port city on the Red Sea's Gulf of Aqaba. Inhabited since 4000 B.C., it's home to the Islamic-era Aqaba Fort and the adjacent Aqaba Archaeological Museum. Its beach resorts are popular for windsurfing and other water sports, and the area is a top destination for scuba divers, with notable dive sites including the Yamanieh coral reef in the Aqaba Marine Park, south of the city.

Day 104Port of Call Al AqabaDeparture 11:00pm

Overview

Aqaba is a Jordanian port city on the Red Sea's Gulf of Aqaba. Inhabited since 4000 B.C., it's home to the Islamic-era Aqaba Fort and the adjacent Aqaba Archaeological Museum. Its beach resorts are popular for windsurfing and other water sports, and the area is a top destination for scuba divers, with notable dive sites including the Yamanieh coral reef in the Aqaba Marine Park, south of the city.

Day 105 Cruising
Day 106 Transit the Suez Canal Arrival 6:00amDeparture 6:00pm
Day 107Port of Call Ashdod Arrival 8:00amDeparture 11:00pm

Overview

Ashdod is the sixth-largest city and the largest port in Israel accounting for 60% of the country's imported goods. Ashdod is located in the Southern District of the country, on the Mediterranean coast where it is situated between Tel Aviv to the North and Ashkelon to the South. Jerusalem is 53 km to the east. The city is also an important regional industrial center. Modern Ashdod covers the territory of two ancient twin towns, one inland and one on the coast, which were for most of their history two separate entities, connected by close ties with each other. This article deals with these historic towns, including other ancient nearby sites, and modern Ashdod.

Day 108Port of Call Haifa Arrival 8:00amDeparture 10:30pm

Overview

Haifa, Israel's third largest city and northern capital is the heart of it all! Situated in a broad natural bay between the beautiful Mediterranean Sea and the inspiring Carmel Mountain, the city's terraced landscape offers a rich variety of breathtaking panoramas, giving the observer the sensation of being on a heavenly peninsula. To the Northeast, across the sparkling waters of the harbor sits the medieval walled fortress city of Acre. Directly North, if the weather is good, beacon the heights of Rosh Hanikra, the white cliff, checkpoint on the Israel-Lebanon border. Further East towers the snow capped peak of Mount Hermon. Haifa is home to 250,000 inhabitants, members of five different religions, living side by side in harmony, peace and mutual respect. A rich tapestry of contrasts and colors, varying cultures, and ethnic groups makes up the fabric of life in Haifa. Secular, Religious and Ultra-Orthodox Jews live side by side with Christians, Moslems, Bahai and Druze. Wadi Nisnas, with its colorful shouk and bustling streets is an authentic Middle Eastern neighborhood. Nearby, the Orthodox Geula Street, recalls the sights and sounds of an East European community. Close at hand, reside the carefully anicured Persian gardens and the glittering gold dome of the Bahai Shrine, World Center of the Bahai faith.

Day 109 Cruising
Day 110Port of Call Kusadasi Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

This seaside resort town has grown immensely in the last 30 years, and is especially popular with package holiday-makers from Europe. From a population of 6000 in the 1970s, it is now closer to 50,000, although a high proportion of this are part of the tourist industry and here only for the summer. Many cruising ships travelling around the Aegean Islands stop here, especially because of its close proximity (20km) to Selcuk. Kusadasi is a good base to explore this and other ancient cities like Priene and Didyma. Although there is little of historical interest in Kusadasi itself, the town is popular predominantly because of its many hotels, restaurants, souvenir and carpet shops, and lively nightlife. The Kale district has some old traditional houses and narrow streets, and gives some indication of what the town used to be like. The most famous beach is Kadinlar Plaji, 2.5km south of the town, dominated by huge hotels and can get very crowded in summer. There are several small beaches further south, and closer to town is Yilanci Burnu, the peninsular.

Day 111 Cruising
Day 111Port of Call Istanbul Arrival 4:00pm

Overview

Istanbul is an international art and cultural center. The International Arts and Cultural Festival is held each year in June and July with famous artists coming from all over the world. These performances are held mostly at the Ataturk Cultural Center. Those who enjoy classical music can hear it at the Cemal Resit Rey Hall. Operas, operettas, ballets, films, concerts, exhibitions and conferences all contribute to the cultural palette of the city. Istanbul also has a rich program of light entertainment. Nightclubs provide splendid entertainment throughout dinner, ranging from a selection of Turkish songs to belly-dancing. Istanbul is a preffered city in terms of international art activities . This is because the art-lovers of Istanbul are respectful to the art and the artist. The famous performance artists feel themselves very comfortable in Istanbul concerts. Because the audience is very well aware of "the rituel of watching an artistic performance." The artist knows that he or she will not come across with impudent or disrespectful behavviours. It is the same for the international picture galleries, biennials, and visual activities. Neither the spectator nor the critic leave their "respectful attitude aganist the artist. " Hence the myths of traditional pop-rock genres, giants of jazz contempoporarylegends of classical western music are always in Istanbul, on the stage. To sum up; Istanbul is a city that can add compassion next to its giant size in terms of living area and population, and siling to assimilate the universal culture while "welcoming" it with utmost hospitality: a "world city" In this case, it deserves to be called "universal culture capital"

Day 112Port of Call IstanbulDeparture 4:00pm

Overview

Istanbul is an international art and cultural center. The International Arts and Cultural Festival is held each year in June and July with famous artists coming from all over the world. These performances are held mostly at the Ataturk Cultural Center. Those who enjoy classical music can hear it at the Cemal Resit Rey Hall. Operas, operettas, ballets, films, concerts, exhibitions and conferences all contribute to the cultural palette of the city. Istanbul also has a rich program of light entertainment. Nightclubs provide splendid entertainment throughout dinner, ranging from a selection of Turkish songs to belly-dancing. Istanbul is a preffered city in terms of international art activities . This is because the art-lovers of Istanbul are respectful to the art and the artist. The famous performance artists feel themselves very comfortable in Istanbul concerts. Because the audience is very well aware of "the rituel of watching an artistic performance." The artist knows that he or she will not come across with impudent or disrespectful behavviours. It is the same for the international picture galleries, biennials, and visual activities. Neither the spectator nor the critic leave their "respectful attitude aganist the artist. " Hence the myths of traditional pop-rock genres, giants of jazz contempoporarylegends of classical western music are always in Istanbul, on the stage. To sum up; Istanbul is a city that can add compassion next to its giant size in terms of living area and population, and siling to assimilate the universal culture while "welcoming" it with utmost hospitality: a "world city" In this case, it deserves to be called "universal culture capital"

Day 113Port of Call Mykonos Arrival 11:00amDeparture 11:00pm

Overview

Mykonos is world-famous. It is no coincidence that this, the most cosmopolitan of all Greek islands, attracts so many visitors from all over the globe, including large numbers of artists and intellectuals. Here, the steep mountains to be encountered in most of the Cyclades give way to low, rocky hills which combine with superb beaches to make up the landscape of the island. The capital, Hora (Chora), with its colourful harbour in which little fishingboats nestle happily side by side with luxury yachts, presents quite a different picture from the majority of Aegean island towns. While it is usual for island villages to be built on naturally amphitheatrical sites, Mykonos is spread out over a flat area and conveys an impression of lid aesthetic cohesion. Along the whitewashed streets stand brilliant white box-shaped houses with stepped walls for sitting on, wooden doors and windows and brightly-coloured balconies. These are interspersed with small but impressive churches, pretty little tavernas and shops selling souvenirs and other goods, and the overall sense is of being inside a film set. On the low Kastro hill is the complex of churches known collectively as Our Lady 'Paraportiani', a superb arrangement of whitewashed masses created over the centuries and now recognised as a national cultural monument. Of particular historical and aesthetic interest are the medieval houses in this district of the town, which stand like a wall above the sea protecting the west side of Hora. The Archaeological Museum of Hora contains finds from tombs on the nearby island of Rhenia, sculptures, vases and figurines. The Folklore Museum brings together a number of collections of furniture, icons, pieces of sculpture and folk musical instruments. Mykonos is also the home of the Nautical Museum of the Aegean, which has interest all of its own. The countryside of Mykonos is a mixture of grey-green rocks ringed by prickly pear plants and little fertile areas carpeted with wild flowers. Here and there are tiny whitewashed chapels and windmills. Ano Mera is, after Hora, the most important of the older villages on the island. Standing 8 km. to the east of the town, Ano Mera has the interesting monastery of Our Lady Tourliani, ornamented with fine wood-carvings. The church has a collection of valuable ecclesiastical vessels, vestments and embroideries. The courtyard contains an interesting bell-tower and a marble fountain. Here lovers of the sea will find outstanding golden beaches such as Agios Stefanos, Psarou, Kalafatis, Platis Gialos, Ornos, Elia and Panormos. Miykonos is a busy island with all the amenities of a modern resort and with plenty to do - by day or night for those who want to have a lively time. Yet visitors fond of more peaceful holidays will still find quiet corners in which to relax.

Day 114Port of Call Athens/Piraeus Arrival 7:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Today Piraeus is the home base of Greek shipping, the largest commercial fleet in the world, apace bound to the sea like few others. The harbours of Zea and Mikrolimano as well as Phaliro play host to countless yachts and sailing craft throughout the year. Piraeus was known in medieval times as Porto Leone, a name due to the enormous stone lion, which guarded the port's entrance. Today, the life of Piraeus is centred on its three ports: the main, central one and those of Zea and Mikrolimano. You can walk around the central harbour, shared by cargo and passenger ships alike, and watch the constant comings and goings of goods and people from around the world. Having completed your tour of the central harbour of Piraeus you will then head south traversing the peninsula and arrive at Peiraiki, one of the most picturesque neighbour hoods in the city. Here one finds the harbour of Zea, one of the largest marinas in the Mediterranean. If the night finds you in the area, you can try one of the many bars found nearby. You can continue your tour along the waterfront heading towards Kastella but a small deviation toward the city centre will be useful for then you can visit the verdant square of the municipal Theatre with cafeterias and shops of all kinds surrounding it. The magnificent building housing the Municipal Theatre as well as the Town Hall and the Library complete the picture presented by the main square in the city. Piraeus's little natural harbours are among its busiest and most touristy areas: Mikrolimano, Passalimani, Zea, Freatida and Hatzikiriakio. Countless seaside tavernas provide delicious seafood washed down with the uniquely Greek drink, ouzo. The fresh smell of the sea and the sounds made by the assortment of caiques, yachts and sailing ships, which are moored next to the tables, complete the enjoyment of the food Beyond the port, the most impressive spots are the hills of Profitis Ilias and Kastela with their neoclassical mansions and modern buildings which look as they are hanging over the sea.

Day 115 Cruising
Day 116Port of Call Naples Arrival 8:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Naples, a city in southern Italy, sits on the Bay of Naples. Nearby is Mount Vesuvius, the still-active volcano that destroyed nearby Roman town Pompeii. Dating to the 2nd millennium B.C., Naples has centuries of important art and architecture. The city's cathedral, the Duomo di San Gennaro, is filled with frescoes. Other major landmarks include the lavish Royal Palace and Castel Nuovo, a 13th-century castle.

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Day 119Port of Call Malaga Arrival 7:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Malaga is the major coastal city of Andalucia and is a genuine and typical Andaluz city with a gritty individualism untouched by tourism and, to a large extent, the passage of time. The Moors occupied the city until the mid fifteenth century, after which it grew to become one of the foremost merchant centres in the entire Iberian Peninsula. This illustrious past has left its imprint on the historic centre, particularly around La Alcazaba, a fortress which dates back to 1065 and is now a fascinating archaeological museum. Also worth a visit is the nearby castle which was rebuilt by the Moors and is today a traditional parador (state hotel) with superb panoramic views. During the nineteenth century, Malaga was a popular winter resort for the wealthy famed for its elegance and sophistication. The impressive park on Calle Alameda dates back to this era and is recognised as being one of the mostcelebrated botanical collections in Europe. During the winter, open air concerts are held here every Sunday which makes a refreshing change from the bucket and spade scenario on the coast. Pablo Picasso is the city’s famous son (not counting Antonio Banderas of course!) and there are several galleries showing his work, including the 16th century Museum of Fine Arts, adjacent to the Cathedral His birthplace in Plaza Merced is today an archive of his life and works and open tothe public; the entrance is absolutely free (so are all the services: Documentation Centre, exhibitions, museum, video projections...) Málaga's main theatre is the "Theatro Cervantes" where Antonio Banderas once trod the boards. He still visits. As well as being a cultural centre, Malaga is also a great place to eat out. The Malaguen´os love their food and the bars and restaurants here are where the real social life takes place. The choice in unlimited and, on the whole, reasonable with some bars offering a menu of the day with bread and wine for as little as 700 pesetas. Tapas, small portions of many different dishes is an Andalusian tradition and a wonderfully inexpensive way to try a variety of local food. The best known local fare in Malaga is pescaito frito, an assortment of fried fish, including small sardines and red mullet, best washed down with a glass of ice cold fino at one of the many old fashioned bodegas in town. But it is El Palo, to the east of the city which is a typical fisherman’s village and the place to go if you want that veritable ‘catch of the day’ freshness. In the centre try a tapas and a glass of Malaga wine at Malaga's oldest tapas bar called "Antigua Casa de la Guardia". Keep to the north side of the Alameda and find no. 16. Malaga is always closed for the siesta period, so this is a perfect time for a long relaxing lunch. These days, Malaga prides itself on being a modern city with the heart of commerce dominated by Calle Larios which is the local Bond Street equivalent. This is the recommended place to start exploring the city as it is surrounded by attractive small streets and plazas, as well as the magnificent cathedral (Renaissance cathedral with a Baroque façade and choir by Pedro de Mena) which offers daily guided tours. Garden lovers won't be disappointed in Malaga either. In the centre of the city is the beautiful Alameda Gardens, and just outside on the way to Antequera one finds the extensive Jardines de la Concepcion. Málaga airport is of course on of the major airports in Spain due to the number of tourist arrivals on charter flights from Northern Europe using Malaga airport as a gateway to the Costa del Sol.

Day 120 Cruising
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Day 122Port of Call Ponta Delgada Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Ponta Delgada, capital of the Azores, is situated on the largest island, Sao Miguel, of the Azores. It has marvellous churches, some with fabulous Baroque interiors. Also palaces from the 17th and 18th centuries. Other places worth visiting are the Lagoa do Fogo and the village of Ribeira Grande, which has important architectonic features. Set within the confines of a wide inlet, Ponta Delgada is the tourist heart of São Miguel. Museums and monuments abound, and historic streets connect hotels, restaurants and shops. A marina harbours sailboats from Europe and America. And for those who enjoy entertainment after hours, the night brings with it a touch of animation.

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Day 129Port of Call Fort Lauderdale Arrival 7:00am

Overview

Ft Lauderdale is a city of islands held together by an intricate web of canals, rivers, bays and waterways hundreds of miles long. Needless to say, boating is a favorite city pastime, whether zooming along on a speedboat, enjoying a fishing charter, or cruising the coastline by yacht. Beautiful homes of every size and style make up the bulk of this primarily residential area. By the beach, a leisurly stroll can be taken along the new landscaping wavewall design of the beachfront promenade. But this city is anything but sedate. Once a spring break hot spot, the town still has an energetic and colorful nightlife. Nearby, charming Laudrdale-By-the-Sea is home to one of the only living coral reefs in the US accesible from shore. Las Olas Boulevard, a shoppers paradise, is the chic new shopping and trendy dining area of downtown. If sports are more your inclination, dozens of golf courses and hundreds of public parks allow you to absorb the great Florida outdoors. Cultural arts are also popular. Water taxis bring theater-goers from throughout the city to the Performing Arts Center on the water.

Onboard the Zaandam

Ship Rating

3.0 of 5 stars

Costco Member Rating:
4.3/5 (551 Ratings)

Designed to carry fewer guests while providing more space for maximum comfort, Zaandam is a prize in the mid-size ship category. On the musically themed Zaandam, you'll find musical instruments such as Bill Clinton's saxophone and signed guitars from Queen, Iggy Pop, Eric Clapton and the Rolling Stones throughout the ship. In her soaring three-story atrium: a Baroque-style Dutch pipe organ, inspired by the traditional barrel organs still found on the streets of The Netherlands.

Onboard Activities

Activities & Services (included in cruise)

Pool

  • Card Room
  • Casino
  • Disco/Nightclub
  • Movies
  • Theater/Show Lounge
  • Fitness Center
  • Sauna/Steam Room
  • Culinary Arts Center
  • Educational Programs
  • Pool - Outdoor
  • Sports Facilities
  • Whirlpool/Jacuzzi
  • Art Gallery
  • Bars/Lounges
  • Library
  • Children's Indoor Play Area
  • Children's Outdoor Play Area
  • Organized Age Specific Activities
  • Teen Center or Disco
  • Teen Programs
  • Business Center
  • Concierge Desk
  • Duty-Free Shops/Boutiques
  • Elevators
  • Safe Deposit Boxes

Activities & Services (available for an extra fee)

Greenhouse Spa

  • Beauty Salon
  • Full-Service Spa
  • Internet Center
  • Babysitting
  • Dry Cleaning/ Laundry Service
  • Infirmary/Medical Center
  • Self-Service Laundromat

Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the cruise line without notice. Staterooms designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Dining

Dining Room

Main Dining

Rotterdam Dining Room: For breakfast, lunch or an unforgettable five-course dinner, the elegant main Dining Room is your destination for sophisticated dining, with menu selections from classic favorites to vegetarian options, to dishes inspired by the regions you’ll visit. Menus by Holland America Line's Culinary Council® of world-renowned chefs.

Pinnacle Grill

Specialty Dining

Pinnacle Grill: Enjoy dishes inspired by America’s Pacific Northwest, such as king salmon from Alaska and choice, responsibly raised beef from Washington State’s Double R Ranch. Complement your meal with a selection of boutique wines from the Pacific Northwest and other celebrated vineyards from around the world. This restaurant is available for an additional cost.

Canaletto: This authentic Italian restaurant offers a menu that celebrates spartire (Italian for "sharing"). Try braised chicken cacciatore "al forno," branzino ai ferri or a classic Italian pasta: spaghetti pomodoro or garlic shrimp-infused ravioli, perhaps. Buon appetito! This restaurant is available for an additional cost.

Room Service

Casual Dining

Lido Market: Lido Market provides a fresh, new approach to casual dining for breakfast, lunch or dinner, with a panoramic view of the sea. A modern marketplace with different themed stations, the Lido offers a curated selection of delicious options to grab on the go or to have quickly made to order.

Dive-In: Dive in to a grilled burger on brioche or a Nathan’s Famous gourmet hot dog. For alfresco dining by the pool, Dive-In has it all, including lighter fare like the grilled chicken breast sandwich and vegetarian-friendly portabella mushroom stack.

Explorations Café: A comfortable, coffeehouse environment offering espresso drinks and pastries. This restaurant is available for an additional cost.

Room Service: Complimentary 24-hour dining in the comfort of your stateroom.


Times, costs and other specifics are outside the control of Costco Travel. All information is at the sole discretion of the cruise line and is subject to change without notice. Dining time and table size preferences are submitted to the cruise line on a first-come, first-served request basis and are confirmed aboard ship. Questions, concerns and/or special needs regarding dining arrangements must be addressed with the maitre d' hotel aboard ship. Every effort is made to accommodate travelers' preferences; however, Costco Travel cannot guarantee dining arrangements. In specialty restaurants, space is limited and reservations are recommended. A cover charge and dress code may apply.

Staterooms

Staterooms feature premium massage showerheads, fine linens and fresh fruit upon request.

Standard Interior Stateroom (Category: N)

Category: N
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, shower. Approximately 182–293 sq. ft.

Room Amenities:

  • Our signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • Luxurious bathrobes for use during your voyage
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Large Interior Stateroom (Category: MM)

Category: MM
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, shower. Approximately 182–293 sq. ft.

Room Amenities:

  • Our signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • Luxurious bathrobes for use during your voyage
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Large Interior Stateroom (Category: M)

Category: M
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, shower. Approximately 182–293 sq. ft.

Room Amenities:

  • Our signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • Luxurious bathrobes for use during your voyage
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Large Interior Stateroom (Category: L)

Category: L
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, shower. Approximately 182–293 sq. ft.

Room Amenities:

  • Our signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • Luxurious bathrobes for use during your voyage
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Large Interior Stateroom (Category: K)

Category: K
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, shower. Approximately 182–293 sq. ft.

Room Amenities:

  • Our signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • Luxurious bathrobes for use during your voyage
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Large Interior Stateroom (Category: J)

Category: J
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, shower. Approximately 182–293 sq. ft.

Room Amenities:

  • Our signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • Luxurious bathrobes for use during your voyage
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Large Interior Stateroom (Category: I)

Category: I
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, shower. Approximately 182–293 sq. ft.

Room Amenities:

  • Our signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • Luxurious bathrobes for use during your voyage
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Elegant staterooms feature luxurious bedding, premium massage showerheads, a porthole or a window and fresh fruit upon request.

Large Outside Stateroom (fully obstructed view) (Category: HH)

Category: HH
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, bathtub, shower. All HH staterooms have fully obstructed views. Approximately 140–319 sq. ft.

Room Amenities:

  • Our signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • Luxurious bathrobes for use during your voyage
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Large Outside Stateroom (partial sea view) (Category: H)

Category: H
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, bathtub, shower. All H staterooms have partial sea views. Approximately 140–319 sq. ft.

Room Amenities:

  • Our signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • Luxurious bathrobes for use during your voyage
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Large Outside Stateroom (porthole) (Category: G)

Category: G
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, bathtub, shower. All G-category staterooms also have 1 sofa bed & pullman upper. Staterooms have portholes instead of windows. Approximately 140–319 sq. ft.

Room Amenities:

  • Our signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • Luxurious bathrobes for use during your voyage
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Large Ocean-View Stateroom (Category: FF)

Category: FF
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, bathtub, shower. All FF-category staterooms also have 1 sofa bed & pullman upper. Approximately 140–319 sq. ft.

Room Amenities:

  • Our signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • Luxurious bathrobes for use during your voyage
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Large Ocean-View Stateroom (Category: F)

Category: F
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, bathtub, shower. All FF-category staterooms also have 1 sofa bed & pullman upper. Approximately 140–319 sq. ft.

Room Amenities:

  • Our signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • Luxurious bathrobes for use during your voyage
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Large Ocean-View Stateroom (Category: EE)

Category: EE
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, bathtub, shower. All FF-category staterooms also have 1 sofa bed & pullman upper. Approximately 140–319 sq. ft.

Room Amenities:

  • Our signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • Luxurious bathrobes for use during your voyage
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Large Ocean-View Stateroom (Category: E)

Category: E
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, bathtub, shower. All FF-category staterooms also have 1 sofa bed & pullman upper. Approximately 140–319 sq. ft.

Room Amenities:

  • Our signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • Luxurious bathrobes for use during your voyage
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Large Ocean-View Stateroom (Category: DA)

Category: DA
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, bathtub, shower. Approximately 140–319 sq. ft.

Room Amenities:

  • Our signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • Luxurious bathrobes for use during your voyage
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Large Ocean-View Stateroom (Category: D)

Category: D
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, bathtub, shower. All FF-category staterooms also have 1 sofa bed & pullman upper. Approximately 140–319 sq. ft.

Room Amenities:

  • Our signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • Luxurious bathrobes for use during your voyage
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Large Ocean-View Stateroom (Category: C)

Category: C
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, bathtub, shower. Approximately 140–319 sq. ft.

Room Amenities:

  • Our signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • Luxurious bathrobes for use during your voyage
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Spacious staterooms have a private balcony, whirlpool bath (some with shower only) and more.

Vista Suite with Verandah (Category: BC)

Category: BC
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, whirlpool bath & shower, sitting area, private verandah, mini-bar, refrigerator, floor-to-ceiling windows. All A-category staterooms also have 1 sofa bed. Approximately 297–379 sq. ft. including verandah.

Room Amenities:

  • Premium duvet, and soft, cotton bathrobes and slippers
  • Binoculars for use during voyage
  • Teak-lined private verandah
  • A variety of firm, medium and soft pillows
  • No-host mini-bar for easy entertaining
  • One-touch telephone concierge service
  • Fresh flowers
  • Umbrellas for your use on the cruise
  • Signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Complimentary DVD library
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Vista Suite with Verandah (Category: BB)

Category: BB
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, whirlpool bath & shower, sitting area, private verandah, mini-bar, refrigerator, floor-to-ceiling windows. All A-category staterooms also have 1 sofa bed. Approximately 297–379 sq. ft. including verandah.

Room Amenities:

  • Premium duvet, and soft, cotton bathrobes and slippers
  • Binoculars for use during voyage
  • Teak-lined private verandah
  • A variety of firm, medium and soft pillows
  • No-host mini-bar for easy entertaining
  • One-touch telephone concierge service
  • Fresh flowers
  • Umbrellas for your use on the cruise
  • Signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Complimentary DVD library
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Vista Suite with Verandah (Category: B)

Category: B
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, whirlpool bath & shower, sitting area, private verandah, mini-bar, refrigerator, floor-to-ceiling windows. Approximately 297–379 sq. ft. including verandah.

Room Amenities:

  • Premium duvet, and soft, cotton bathrobes and slippers
  • Binoculars for use during voyage
  • Teak-lined private verandah
  • A variety of firm, medium and soft pillows
  • No-host mini-bar for easy entertaining
  • One-touch telephone concierge service
  • Fresh flowers
  • Umbrellas for your use on the cruise
  • Signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Complimentary DVD library
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Vista Suite with Verandah (Category: AA)

Category: AA
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, whirlpool bath & shower, sitting area, private verandah, mini-bar, refrigerator, floor-to-ceiling windows. Approximately 297–379 sq. ft. including verandah.

Room Amenities:

  • Premium duvet, and soft, cotton bathrobes and slippers
  • Binoculars for use during voyage
  • Teak-lined private verandah
  • A variety of firm, medium and soft pillows
  • No-host mini-bar for easy entertaining
  • One-touch telephone concierge service
  • Fresh flowers
  • Umbrellas for your use on the cruise
  • Signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Complimentary DVD library
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Vista Suite with Verandah (Category: A)

Category: A
2 lower beds convertible to 1 queen-size bed, whirlpool bath & shower, sitting area, private verandah, mini-bar, refrigerator, floor-to-ceiling windows. Approximately 297–379 sq. ft. including verandah.

Room Amenities:

  • Premium duvet, and soft, cotton bathrobes and slippers
  • Binoculars for use during voyage
  • Teak-lined private verandah
  • A variety of firm, medium and soft pillows
  • No-host mini-bar for easy entertaining
  • One-touch telephone concierge service
  • Fresh flowers
  • Umbrellas for your use on the cruise
  • Signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Complimentary DVD library
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Neptune Suite with Verandah (Category: SA)

Category: SA
2 lower beds convertible to one king-size bed, whirlpool bath & shower, large sitting area, dressing room, private verandah, 1 sofa bed for 2 persons, mini-bar, refrigerator, floor-to-ceiling windows. Approximately 558–566 sq. ft. including verandah.

Room Amenities:

  • Bose® Bluetooth-enabled Soundlink
  • Complimentary mimosas with in-suite breakfast
  • Premium duvet, and soft, cotton bathrobes and slippers
  • Binoculars for use during voyage
  • Expanded line of Elemis bath amenities
  • In-suite coffee and espresso machine
  • A very special amenity exclusively for guests cruising in a Neptune or Pinnacle Suite, the industry-leading Neptune Lounge features a private place to relax, socialize with other suite guests and enjoy the personalized service of a concierge. The fleet-wide lounges provide worktables, large screen television, library, sofas and chairs, refreshments throughout the day and Wi-Fi for a small charge. One-Touch 24-hour Concierge Service is available when the Neptune Lounge is closed.
  • Complimentary laundry, pressing and dry cleaning throughout your cruise
  • Complimentary sparkling wine served in the Neptune Lounge upon embarkation
  • Complimentary bottled water provided in suite at embarkation
  • Gorgeous corsages and boutonnieres for the first formal night
  • Cold hors d'oeuvres served before dinner each evening on request
  • Priority boarding for tendered ports of call
  • Special disembarkation service
  • Priority dining and seating requests
  • Exclusive daily breakfast service
  • High tea service in suite on request
  • Teak-lined private verandah
  • A variety of firm, medium and soft pillows
  • No-host mini-bar for easy entertaining
  • One-touch telephone concierge service
  • Fresh flowers
  • Umbrellas for your use on the cruise
  • Signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Complimentary DVD library
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Neptune Suite with Verandah (Category: SB)

Category: SB
2 lower beds convertible to one king-size bed, whirlpool bath & shower, large sitting area, dressing room, private verandah, 1 sofa bed for 2 persons, mini-bar, refrigerator, floor-to-ceiling windows. Approximately 558–566 sq. ft. including verandah.

Room Amenities:

  • Bose® Bluetooth-enabled Soundlink
  • Complimentary mimosas with in-suite breakfast
  • Premium duvet, and soft, cotton bathrobes and slippers
  • Binoculars for use during voyage
  • Expanded line of Elemis bath amenities
  • In-suite coffee and espresso machine
  • A very special amenity exclusively for guests cruising in a Neptune or Pinnacle Suite, the industry-leading Neptune Lounge features a private place to relax, socialize with other suite guests and enjoy the personalized service of a concierge. The fleet-wide lounges provide worktables, large screen television, library, sofas and chairs, refreshments throughout the day and Wi-Fi for a small charge. One-Touch 24-hour Concierge Service is available when the Neptune Lounge is closed.
  • Complimentary laundry, pressing and dry cleaning throughout your cruise
  • Complimentary sparkling wine served in the Neptune Lounge upon embarkation
  • Complimentary bottled water provided in suite at embarkation
  • Gorgeous corsages and boutonnieres for the first formal night
  • Cold hors d'oeuvres served before dinner each evening on request
  • Priority boarding for tendered ports of call
  • Special disembarkation service
  • Priority dining and seating requests
  • Exclusive daily breakfast service
  • High tea service in suite on request
  • Teak-lined private verandah
  • A variety of firm, medium and soft pillows
  • No-host mini-bar for easy entertaining
  • One-touch telephone concierge service
  • Fresh flowers
  • Umbrellas for your use on the cruise
  • Signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Complimentary DVD library
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Pinnacle Suite with Verandah (Category: PS)

Category: PS
Bedroom with one king-size bed, oversize whirlpool bath & shower, living room, dining room, dressing room, private verandah, pantry, 1 sofa bed for 2 persons, mini-bar, refrigerator, guest toilet, floor-to-ceiling windows. Approximately 1,296 sq. ft. including verandah.

Room Amenities:

  • Bose® Bluetooth-enabled Soundlink
  • Complimentary mimosas with in-suite breakfast
  • Premium duvet, and soft, cotton bathrobes and slippers
  • Binoculars for use during voyage
  • Expanded line of Elemis bath amenities
  • In-suite coffee and espresso machine
  • A very special amenity exclusively for guests cruising in a Neptune or Pinnacle Suite, the industry-leading Neptune Lounge features a private place to relax, socialize with other suite guests and enjoy the personalized service of a concierge. The fleet-wide lounges provide worktables, large screen television, library, sofas and chairs, refreshments throughout the day and Wi-Fi for a small charge. One-Touch 24-hour Concierge Service is available when the Neptune Lounge is closed.
  • Complimentary laundry, pressing and dry cleaning throughout your cruise
  • Complimentary sparkling wine served in the Neptune Lounge upon embarkation
  • Complimentary bottled water provided in suite at embarkation
  • Gorgeous corsages and boutonnieres for the first formal night
  • Cold hors d'oeuvres served before dinner each evening on request
  • Priority boarding for tendered ports of call
  • Special disembarkation service
  • Priority dining and seating requests
  • Exclusive daily breakfast service
  • High tea service in suite on request
  • Teak-lined private verandah
  • A variety of firm, medium and soft pillows
  • No-host mini-bar for easy entertaining
  • One-touch telephone concierge service
  • Fresh flowers
  • Umbrellas for your use on the cruise
  • Signature Mariner's Dream™ bed featuring a plush Euro-Top mattress and finely woven cotton linens
  • 100% Egyptian cotton towels
  • Premium massage showerheads
  • 5X magnifying make-up mirrors and salon-quality hair dryers
  • Fragrant soaps, lotions, shampoo and other bath amenities from Elemis Aromapure
  • Complimentary fresh fruit on request
  • Elegant ice bucket and serving tray for in-stateroom beverages
  • Flat-panel TV and DVD player
  • Complimentary DVD library
  • Ice service, shoeshine service and nightly turndown service

Deck Plan

Cruise Ship
Sky Deck
Key to Symbols
SymbolDescription
Shower onlyShower only
Bathtub & showerBathtub & shower
2 lower beds convert to 1 queen-size bed (no sofa bed)2 lower beds convert to 1 queen-size bed (no sofa bed)
Triple (2 lower beds, 1 sofa bed)Triple (2 lower beds, 1 sofa bed)
Quad (2 lower beds, 1 sofa bed, 1 upper)Quad (2 lower beds, 1 sofa bed, 1 upper)
Partial sea viewPartial sea view
These staterooms have portholes instead of windowsThese staterooms have portholes instead of windows
2 lower beds not convertible to a queen-size bed2 lower beds not convertible to a queen-size bed
Fully obstructed viewFully obstructed view
Suites B7088, B7087, B6228, and B6225 and stateroom EE3429 are fully accessible, roll-in shower onlySuites B7088, B7087, B6228, and B6225 and stateroom EE3429 are fully accessible, roll-in shower only
Suite SA7034 is fully accessible with single side approach to the bed, bathtub, and roll-in shower; Staterooms DA6104, G1805, and G1804 are fully accessible with single side approach to the bed, roll-in shower onlySuite SA7034 is fully accessible with single side approach to the bed, bathtub, and roll-in shower; Staterooms DA6104, G1805, and G1804 are fully accessible with single side approach to the bed, roll-in shower only
Staterooms EE3396, EE3391, HH3431, HH3430, E2702, L2700, J2555, J2554, G2500, FF1964, FF1955, G1807, and G1806 are ambulatory accessible, roll-in shower onlyStaterooms EE3396, EE3391, HH3431, HH3430, E2702, L2700, J2555, J2554, G2500, FF1964, FF1955, G1807, and G1806 are ambulatory accessible, roll-in shower only

Ship Facts

Zaandam ship image
  • Ship Name: Zaandam
  • Year Built: 2000
  • Year Refurbished: 2013
  • Year Entered Present Fleet: 2000
  • Ship Class: R
  • Maximum Capacity: 1,837
  • Number of Passenger Decks: 10
  • Number of Crew: 615
  • Officers' Nationality: International
  • Ocean-View without Balcony: 385
  • Total Inside Staterooms: 134
  • Tonnage (GRT): 61,396
  • Capacity Based on Double Occupancy: 1,432
  • Country of Registry: Netherlands
  • Total Staterooms: 716
  • Suites with Balcony: 197
  • Crew/Hotel Staff Nationality: International
Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the hotel, resort or cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the provider without notice. Hotels, resorts, ships or accommodations designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Available Dates & Prices

Departure Date

Inside Stateroom

Ocean View Stateroom

Balcony Stateroom

Suite Stateroom

Terms & Conditions

*Price shown is per person based on double occupancy, is valid for select stateroom categories only, and does not include government taxes/fees and gratuities. Click on Terms & Conditions link below for details.

†The exact amount of the Costco Shop Card will be calculated during the booking process. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for additional information.

Ship's registry: The Netherlands

    Package ID: HALZAAWOR20220103