Alaska: Alaska Wilderness Spectacular- Cruisetour 8B (Pre Tour)

Royal Caribbean®

Exploring the interior of Alaska will give you an entirely different perspective on this vast and rugged state. Take an Inside Passage cruise and gaze upward at the sky that is as blue as the lakes below. Hop on the Alaskan Railroad near Anchorage and see the spruce-lined, mountainous landscape whir by from a new perspective.

Included Extras

Executive Member Benefit

  • Executive Members receive an annual 2% Reward, up to $1,000, on qualified Costco Travel purchases

Costco Shop Card

  • Member Exclusive: Costco Shop Card with every Royal Caribbean® sailing†

Sailing Itinerary

Note: Cruise itineraries are subject to change. Please verify ports and times directly with the cruise line.

Day 1Fairbanks

Overview

If the story of the founding of Fairbanks had happened anywhere else, it wouldn't be told so proudly, for the city's father was a swindler, and its undignified birth contained an element of chance not usually admitted in polite society. As the popular story goes (and the historians' version is fairly close), it seems that in 1901, E. T. Barnette decided to get rich by starting a gold-mining boomtown like the others that had sprouted from Dawson City to Nome as the stampeders of 1898 sloshed back and forth across the territory from one gold find to the next. He booked passage on a riverboat going up the Tanana with his supplies to build the town, having made an understanding with the captain that, should the vessel get stuck, he would lighten the load by getting off with the materials on the nearest bank. Unfortunately, the captain got lost. Thinking he was heading up a slough on the Tanana, he got sidetracked into the relatively small Chena River. That was where the boat got stuck and where Barnette got left, and that was where he founded Fairbanks. Fortunately for Barnette, an Italian prospector named Felix Pedro had been looking for gold in the hills around the new trading post, and made a strike on the Tanana. On that news, Barnette dispatched his Chinese cook off to Dawson City to spread the word. The cook's story showed up in a newspaper that winter, and a stampede of hundreds of miners ensued, heading toward Fairbanks in weather as cold as -50°F. Barnette's town was a success, but the cook nearly got lynched when the stampeders found out how far he'd exaggerated the truth. Much more gold was found later, however, and half the population of Dawson City came down river to Fairbanks. Barnette had made it big. The town's future was assured thanks to a political deal. Barnette did a favor for the territory's judge, James Wickersham, by naming the settlement for Wickersham's ally in Congress, Sen. Charles Fairbanks of Indiana, who later became vice president. Wickersham then moved the federal courthouse to Fairbanks from Eagle--he loaded his records on his dogsled and mushed here, establishing the camp as the hub of the region. Wickersham's story is interesting, too. He was a notable explorer, Alaska's first real statesman as a nonvoting delegate to Congress, and father of the Alaska Railroad. Houses he lived in are preserved at Alaskaland in Fairbanks and in Juneau just up the hill from the capitol building. Barnette didn't do as well in history's eyes: He was run out of the town he founded for bank fraud. Fairbanks is Alaska's second-largest city now, with a population of about 30,000 in the city limits and 82,000 in the greater metropolitan area, but it has never learned to put on airs. It sprawls, broad and flat, along big highways and the Chena. It's a friendly, easygoing town, but one where people still take gold and their independence seriously. They're still prospecting and mining for gold around here, fighting off environmental regulation, and maintaining a traditional Alaskan attitude that it's us against the world. Fairbanks is the birthplace of strange political movements, including the secessionist Alaskan Independence Party. It's an adamant, loopy, affable place; it doesn't seem to mind being a little bizarre or residing far from the center of things. And that makes it an intensely Alaska city, for those are the qualities Alaskans most cherish in their myth of themselves. Fairbanks can strike a visitor a couple of ways, depending on what you expect and what you like. Fairbanks can come across as a provincial outpost, a touristy cross between Kansas and Siberia. Driving one of the franchise-choked commercial strips, you can wonder why you went out of your way to come here, and the deserted downtown area can be downright depressing. Or you can relax and take Fairbanks on its own terms, as a fun, unpretentious town that never lost its sense of being on the frontier. My children love it here. There's plenty for families to do in Fairbanks, much of it at least a little corny and requiring drives to widespread sites at the university, on the Chena River, in the gold mining area north of town, and at a big town park called Alaskaland. (You must have wheels in Fairbanks.) There are good opportunities for hiking and mountain biking, and great opportunities for canoeing and slow river float trips.

Day 2Fairbanks

Overview

If the story of the founding of Fairbanks had happened anywhere else, it wouldn't be told so proudly, for the city's father was a swindler, and its undignified birth contained an element of chance not usually admitted in polite society. As the popular story goes (and the historians' version is fairly close), it seems that in 1901, E. T. Barnette decided to get rich by starting a gold-mining boomtown like the others that had sprouted from Dawson City to Nome as the stampeders of 1898 sloshed back and forth across the territory from one gold find to the next. He booked passage on a riverboat going up the Tanana with his supplies to build the town, having made an understanding with the captain that, should the vessel get stuck, he would lighten the load by getting off with the materials on the nearest bank. Unfortunately, the captain got lost. Thinking he was heading up a slough on the Tanana, he got sidetracked into the relatively small Chena River. That was where the boat got stuck and where Barnette got left, and that was where he founded Fairbanks. Fortunately for Barnette, an Italian prospector named Felix Pedro had been looking for gold in the hills around the new trading post, and made a strike on the Tanana. On that news, Barnette dispatched his Chinese cook off to Dawson City to spread the word. The cook's story showed up in a newspaper that winter, and a stampede of hundreds of miners ensued, heading toward Fairbanks in weather as cold as -50°F. Barnette's town was a success, but the cook nearly got lynched when the stampeders found out how far he'd exaggerated the truth. Much more gold was found later, however, and half the population of Dawson City came down river to Fairbanks. Barnette had made it big. The town's future was assured thanks to a political deal. Barnette did a favor for the territory's judge, James Wickersham, by naming the settlement for Wickersham's ally in Congress, Sen. Charles Fairbanks of Indiana, who later became vice president. Wickersham then moved the federal courthouse to Fairbanks from Eagle--he loaded his records on his dogsled and mushed here, establishing the camp as the hub of the region. Wickersham's story is interesting, too. He was a notable explorer, Alaska's first real statesman as a nonvoting delegate to Congress, and father of the Alaska Railroad. Houses he lived in are preserved at Alaskaland in Fairbanks and in Juneau just up the hill from the capitol building. Barnette didn't do as well in history's eyes: He was run out of the town he founded for bank fraud. Fairbanks is Alaska's second-largest city now, with a population of about 30,000 in the city limits and 82,000 in the greater metropolitan area, but it has never learned to put on airs. It sprawls, broad and flat, along big highways and the Chena. It's a friendly, easygoing town, but one where people still take gold and their independence seriously. They're still prospecting and mining for gold around here, fighting off environmental regulation, and maintaining a traditional Alaskan attitude that it's us against the world. Fairbanks is the birthplace of strange political movements, including the secessionist Alaskan Independence Party. It's an adamant, loopy, affable place; it doesn't seem to mind being a little bizarre or residing far from the center of things. And that makes it an intensely Alaska city, for those are the qualities Alaskans most cherish in their myth of themselves. Fairbanks can strike a visitor a couple of ways, depending on what you expect and what you like. Fairbanks can come across as a provincial outpost, a touristy cross between Kansas and Siberia. Driving one of the franchise-choked commercial strips, you can wonder why you went out of your way to come here, and the deserted downtown area can be downright depressing. Or you can relax and take Fairbanks on its own terms, as a fun, unpretentious town that never lost its sense of being on the frontier. My children love it here. There's plenty for families to do in Fairbanks, much of it at least a little corny and requiring drives to widespread sites at the university, on the Chena River, in the gold mining area north of town, and at a big town park called Alaskaland. (You must have wheels in Fairbanks.) There are good opportunities for hiking and mountain biking, and great opportunities for canoeing and slow river float trips.

Day 3Fairbanks

Overview

If the story of the founding of Fairbanks had happened anywhere else, it wouldn't be told so proudly, for the city's father was a swindler, and its undignified birth contained an element of chance not usually admitted in polite society. As the popular story goes (and the historians' version is fairly close), it seems that in 1901, E. T. Barnette decided to get rich by starting a gold-mining boomtown like the others that had sprouted from Dawson City to Nome as the stampeders of 1898 sloshed back and forth across the territory from one gold find to the next. He booked passage on a riverboat going up the Tanana with his supplies to build the town, having made an understanding with the captain that, should the vessel get stuck, he would lighten the load by getting off with the materials on the nearest bank. Unfortunately, the captain got lost. Thinking he was heading up a slough on the Tanana, he got sidetracked into the relatively small Chena River. That was where the boat got stuck and where Barnette got left, and that was where he founded Fairbanks. Fortunately for Barnette, an Italian prospector named Felix Pedro had been looking for gold in the hills around the new trading post, and made a strike on the Tanana. On that news, Barnette dispatched his Chinese cook off to Dawson City to spread the word. The cook's story showed up in a newspaper that winter, and a stampede of hundreds of miners ensued, heading toward Fairbanks in weather as cold as -50°F. Barnette's town was a success, but the cook nearly got lynched when the stampeders found out how far he'd exaggerated the truth. Much more gold was found later, however, and half the population of Dawson City came down river to Fairbanks. Barnette had made it big. The town's future was assured thanks to a political deal. Barnette did a favor for the territory's judge, James Wickersham, by naming the settlement for Wickersham's ally in Congress, Sen. Charles Fairbanks of Indiana, who later became vice president. Wickersham then moved the federal courthouse to Fairbanks from Eagle--he loaded his records on his dogsled and mushed here, establishing the camp as the hub of the region. Wickersham's story is interesting, too. He was a notable explorer, Alaska's first real statesman as a nonvoting delegate to Congress, and father of the Alaska Railroad. Houses he lived in are preserved at Alaskaland in Fairbanks and in Juneau just up the hill from the capitol building. Barnette didn't do as well in history's eyes: He was run out of the town he founded for bank fraud. Fairbanks is Alaska's second-largest city now, with a population of about 30,000 in the city limits and 82,000 in the greater metropolitan area, but it has never learned to put on airs. It sprawls, broad and flat, along big highways and the Chena. It's a friendly, easygoing town, but one where people still take gold and their independence seriously. They're still prospecting and mining for gold around here, fighting off environmental regulation, and maintaining a traditional Alaskan attitude that it's us against the world. Fairbanks is the birthplace of strange political movements, including the secessionist Alaskan Independence Party. It's an adamant, loopy, affable place; it doesn't seem to mind being a little bizarre or residing far from the center of things. And that makes it an intensely Alaska city, for those are the qualities Alaskans most cherish in their myth of themselves. Fairbanks can strike a visitor a couple of ways, depending on what you expect and what you like. Fairbanks can come across as a provincial outpost, a touristy cross between Kansas and Siberia. Driving one of the franchise-choked commercial strips, you can wonder why you went out of your way to come here, and the deserted downtown area can be downright depressing. Or you can relax and take Fairbanks on its own terms, as a fun, unpretentious town that never lost its sense of being on the frontier. My children love it here. There's plenty for families to do in Fairbanks, much of it at least a little corny and requiring drives to widespread sites at the university, on the Chena River, in the gold mining area north of town, and at a big town park called Alaskaland. (You must have wheels in Fairbanks.) There are good opportunities for hiking and mountain biking, and great opportunities for canoeing and slow river float trips.

Day 3Denali National Park

Overview

Denali National Park and Preserve in Alaska is the very heart of the rugged Alaskan Interior. Denali National Park and Preserve is home to six million acres of wilderness. North America's highest mountain, Mt. McKinley. Glaciers and a sub-arctic ecosystem are found in Denali National Park and Preserve. An internationally designated bio-sphere preserve, Denali National Park and Preserve is home to abundant moose, caribou, Dall sheep, grizzly bears and wolves Denali National Park and Preserve is a place with fascinating Native American culture and history. It is a place where hearty adventurers panned for gold and dog sleds, backpacks and mountaineering gear are common. Alaska is the place of the Midnight Sun. Denali National Park and Preserve is a place where you can live out your Alaska travel dreams, whether they be wild adventures or serene contemplations. Denali National Park and Preserve is a must-see part of your Alaskan vacation.

Day 4Denali National Park

Overview

Denali National Park and Preserve in Alaska is the very heart of the rugged Alaskan Interior. Denali National Park and Preserve is home to six million acres of wilderness. North America's highest mountain, Mt. McKinley. Glaciers and a sub-arctic ecosystem are found in Denali National Park and Preserve. An internationally designated bio-sphere preserve, Denali National Park and Preserve is home to abundant moose, caribou, Dall sheep, grizzly bears and wolves Denali National Park and Preserve is a place with fascinating Native American culture and history. It is a place where hearty adventurers panned for gold and dog sleds, backpacks and mountaineering gear are common. Alaska is the place of the Midnight Sun. Denali National Park and Preserve is a place where you can live out your Alaska travel dreams, whether they be wild adventures or serene contemplations. Denali National Park and Preserve is a must-see part of your Alaskan vacation.

Day 5Denali National Park

Overview

Denali National Park and Preserve in Alaska is the very heart of the rugged Alaskan Interior. Denali National Park and Preserve is home to six million acres of wilderness. North America's highest mountain, Mt. McKinley. Glaciers and a sub-arctic ecosystem are found in Denali National Park and Preserve. An internationally designated bio-sphere preserve, Denali National Park and Preserve is home to abundant moose, caribou, Dall sheep, grizzly bears and wolves Denali National Park and Preserve is a place with fascinating Native American culture and history. It is a place where hearty adventurers panned for gold and dog sleds, backpacks and mountaineering gear are common. Alaska is the place of the Midnight Sun. Denali National Park and Preserve is a place where you can live out your Alaska travel dreams, whether they be wild adventures or serene contemplations. Denali National Park and Preserve is a must-see part of your Alaskan vacation.

Day 5Talkeetna

Overview

Once the site of a Tanaina Indian village and later in the middle of a gold rush, Talkeetna (named for the "River of Plenty") got a big boost when the Alaska Railroad established a construction camp at the river junction early in the 20th century. Now the town is the base for mountain-climbing expeditions in the Alaska Range and activities on the three rivers. With its casual lifestyle, Talkeetna might be considered the "earth mother" of the Susitna Valley.

Day 6Talkeetna

Overview

Once the site of a Tanaina Indian village and later in the middle of a gold rush, Talkeetna (named for the "River of Plenty") got a big boost when the Alaska Railroad established a construction camp at the river junction early in the 20th century. Now the town is the base for mountain-climbing expeditions in the Alaska Range and activities on the three rivers. With its casual lifestyle, Talkeetna might be considered the "earth mother" of the Susitna Valley.

Day 6Anchorage

Overview

Amid the wild countryside that crowds around it on all sides, Anchorage has grown into a spirited, cosmopolitan city - by far Alaska's largest and most sophisticated. The relative affluence of its largely white-collar population - with a sprinkling of olive drab from nearby military bases - attracts fine restaurants and pricey shops, first-rate entertainment, and world-class sporting events. Flashy modern towers punctuate the skyline, and colorful flowers spill from hundreds of baskets on downtown lampposts. Traffic from the city's busy international airport, served by more than 15 international and domestic airlines, lends a more cosmopolitan air than you might expect from a city with a only 258,000 residents - nearly half the people in the state. Yet despite the 14 McDonald's, 2 Wal-Marts, and a 16-plex movie theater, the city has not entirely lost touch with its frontier spirit. Sled-dog races are still revered events, and moose and bear sightings in downtown Anchorage or on the Coastal Trail that rims the water are not uncommon. First incorporated in 1920, Anchorage is still a young city. Its citizens' median age of 30 years and an aggressive style make this - and not the capital city of Juneau - the state's power center. In addition to acting as the center for oil development in the state, Anchorage hustles its living as a government, banking, transportation, and communications hub. Anchorage residents are primarily from elsewhere in America - they include oil workers from such conservative oil-patch states as Oklahoma and Texas - and the attitudes they bring have fueled the conservative, pro-development mentality that characterizes the city and Alaska as a whole. Although representing less than 8% of the population, Alaskan Native peoples add an important cultural dimension. A growing Asian population is also having an impact, with well-stocked Asian food stores and restaurants an increasingly familiar sight. Boom and bust periods followed major events: an influx of military bases during World War II; a massive buildup of Arctic missile-warning stations during the Cold War; reconstruction following the devastating Good Friday earthquake of 1964; and in the late 1960s the biggest bonanza of all - the discovery of oil at Prudhoe Bay and the construction of the trans-Alaska pipeline. Not surprisingly, Anchorage positioned itself as the perfect home for the new pipeline administrators and support industries, and it attracts a large share of the state's oil-tax dollars. In the last decade, Anchorage has become an increasingly important focus of travelers to Alaska. The central location, relatively mild climate, and excellent transportation system make it a natural place to begin or end a trip.

Day 7Anchorage

Overview

Amid the wild countryside that crowds around it on all sides, Anchorage has grown into a spirited, cosmopolitan city - by far Alaska's largest and most sophisticated. The relative affluence of its largely white-collar population - with a sprinkling of olive drab from nearby military bases - attracts fine restaurants and pricey shops, first-rate entertainment, and world-class sporting events. Flashy modern towers punctuate the skyline, and colorful flowers spill from hundreds of baskets on downtown lampposts. Traffic from the city's busy international airport, served by more than 15 international and domestic airlines, lends a more cosmopolitan air than you might expect from a city with a only 258,000 residents - nearly half the people in the state. Yet despite the 14 McDonald's, 2 Wal-Marts, and a 16-plex movie theater, the city has not entirely lost touch with its frontier spirit. Sled-dog races are still revered events, and moose and bear sightings in downtown Anchorage or on the Coastal Trail that rims the water are not uncommon. First incorporated in 1920, Anchorage is still a young city. Its citizens' median age of 30 years and an aggressive style make this - and not the capital city of Juneau - the state's power center. In addition to acting as the center for oil development in the state, Anchorage hustles its living as a government, banking, transportation, and communications hub. Anchorage residents are primarily from elsewhere in America - they include oil workers from such conservative oil-patch states as Oklahoma and Texas - and the attitudes they bring have fueled the conservative, pro-development mentality that characterizes the city and Alaska as a whole. Although representing less than 8% of the population, Alaskan Native peoples add an important cultural dimension. A growing Asian population is also having an impact, with well-stocked Asian food stores and restaurants an increasingly familiar sight. Boom and bust periods followed major events: an influx of military bases during World War II; a massive buildup of Arctic missile-warning stations during the Cold War; reconstruction following the devastating Good Friday earthquake of 1964; and in the late 1960s the biggest bonanza of all - the discovery of oil at Prudhoe Bay and the construction of the trans-Alaska pipeline. Not surprisingly, Anchorage positioned itself as the perfect home for the new pipeline administrators and support industries, and it attracts a large share of the state's oil-tax dollars. In the last decade, Anchorage has become an increasingly important focus of travelers to Alaska. The central location, relatively mild climate, and excellent transportation system make it a natural place to begin or end a trip.

Day 7Port of Call SewardDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Situated at the head of Resurrection Bay on the Kenai Peninsula, Seward is one of Alaska’s oldest and most scenic communities. Known as the "Gateway to Kenai Fjords National Park" Seward is a picturesque town located 126 miles south of Anchorage. Visitors can easily reach us via the Seward Highway Scenic Byway, the Alaska Railroad, bus, air, or cruise ship. Upon your arrival you will discover our bustling harbor and historic downtown district filled with quaint shops and art galleries. Experience trophy sport fishing, glacier and wildlife cruises, sailing, hiking, kayaking, flightseeing, summer dog sled rides, and more. Seward is also a winter wonderland offering cross-country skiing and snowmachining adventures. At 3,022 feet, towering Mt. Marathon provides a breathtaking backdrop for the town. Behind Mt. Marathon and extending down the coast lies the Harding Icefield, measuring 35 by 20 miles. Flowing from the Harding Icefield are many glaciers, eight of which are tidewater glaciers, calving icebergs into the sea, reaching the coastline between Seward and Homer. A wide range of accommodations, restaurants, RV parks, tent camping, and visitor services are available. Wherever you go in Seward, you’ll find friendly hospitality and a sense of pride among our residents. We invite you to visit our community anytime of year and experience the real Alaska!

Day 8Port of Call Hubbard Glacier Arrival 2:00pmDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Stretching over 90 miles long and covering over 1,350 square miles in area, Hubbard Glacier is the largest tidewater glacier in North America. It is also one of the most impressive, a 300-foot wall of ice rising sheer and jagged from the ocean. You may hear the rumble and see the monumental splash as the glacier severs into great ice chunks, known as "calves."

Day 9Port of Call Juneau Arrival 9:00amDeparture 9:00pm

Overview

Considered the "gem" of Southeast Alaska, the city is nestled against the ocean, tucked tight against the mountains and back-dropped by the lush green of the largest national forest in the United States, the Tongass. Visitors will find that Juneau is not only the state's capital, but it's also a melting pot of history, unique topography and jaw-dropping scenery that is found nowhere else on the planet. Whether it's wildlife viewing, glacier trekking, ziplining or just shopping for locally created artwork, visitors to this remote yet extraordinary region will certainly find a bit of "Alaska" to take home.

Day 10Port of Call Skagway Arrival 7:00amDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

Skagway, with a population of 862, is located in the Upper Lynn Canal at the northernmost point on the Inside Passage in Southeast Alaska, 100 air miles north of Juneau and 110 road miles south of Whitehorse, Yukon Territory. The City of Skagway is geographically the largest city in Alaska with 455 square land miles. Skagway's history and spectacular natural setting combine to create unparalleled sightseeing and recreation opportunities. Poke around on your own, or select from a variety of commercial tours. Either way, you will be amply rewarded with the sights and activities in and around Skagway.

Day 11Port of Call Icy Strait Arrival 6:30amDeparture 3:00pm

Overview

Humpback whales feed in Icy Strait above North Chichagof Island, an important travel corridor for many marine mammals, including federally threatened Steller's sea lions. The area's coastal marshes and mudflats are important as resting areas for shorebirds and waterfowl, and provide spring feeding areas for brown bears. Marbled murrelets feed in large numbers within the waters of Icy Strait and nest in the island's coastal old growth forest.

Day 12Port of Call Ketchikan Arrival 10:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

A city of southeast Alaska on an island in the Alexander Archipelago. A supply point for miners during the gold rush of the 1890s, it is now a major port and tourist center on the Inside Passage. Population: 7,450.

Day 13 Cruising
Day 14Port of Call Vancouver Arrival 7:00am

Overview

Vancouver, a bustling west coast seaport in British Columbia, is among Canada’s densest, most ethnically diverse cities. A popular filming location, it’s surrounded by mountains, and also has thriving art, theatre and music scenes. Vancouver Art Gallery is known for its works by regional artists, while the Museum of Anthropology houses preeminent First Nations collections.

Tour Highlights

Day 1 Fairbanks

From the airport, your transfer (included) brings you to your hotel to meet your Adventure Specialist. The Golden Heart City is then yours to explore. Overnight at Sophie’s Station Suites. *Alaska Cruisetour arrival times are tentative. The tour component of your escorted Cruisetour vacation is comprised of tour guide escort, included experiences, lodging and transportation as described. Optional excursions are not included. Meals are not included unless specified as an inclusion.

Day 2 Fairbanks

Spend the day exploring local history, heritage and culture, beginning with a city highlights tour and a visit to the Museum of the North. Enjoy free time downtown for lunch and shopping, then embark on a cruise on the Chena River aboard an old-fashioned sternwheeler. From 6:00 p.m., your time in Fairbanks is your own. Enjoy a hearty frontier meal at a local restaurant or at a dinner theater that tells the story of the gold rush through musical comedy (additional fees apply). Overnight at Sophie’s Station Suites.

Day 3 Fairbanks/Denali

Take in the spectacular scenery from the glass-domed railcars of the Wilderness Express® on the train trip to Denali. From 3:30 p.m., the wonders of Denali are yours to explore. Your Adventure Specialist can recommend optional excursions, from guided hikes to adventures like flightseeing trips or rafting down the Nenana River (additional fees apply). Overnight at Denali Park Village.

Day 4 Denali

The Tundra Wilderness Tour takes you deep into Denali National Park along its lone road for the best chances at seeing wildlife. After your tour, spend time at the museum-like visitor center or take advantage of the biking and hiking trails that begin near the park entrance. Overnight at Denali Park Village.

Day 5 Denali/Talkeetna

There's time to walk the trails around the lodge before boarding the Wilderness Express® heading to Talkeetna. From 5:00 p.m., enjoy a free evening in this funky small town. Locals and visitors mix and mingle in the restaurants, brew pubs, cafes and shops along the historic main street. Overnight at the Talkeetna Alaskan Lodge.

Day 6 Talkeetna/ Anchorage

The day is free for your style of adventure in this hub for outdoor fun. Your Adventure Specialist can recommend optional activities like flightseeing, river rafting and more (additional fees apply). Then relax and take in the views from the Wilderness Express® on the scenic rail journey into Anchorage. From 8:00 p.m., experience big-city nightlife under the evening sun, with restaurants, craft breweries and urban trails all part of the eclectic scene. Overnight at the Anchorage Marriott.

Day 7 Anchorage/ Seward

Discover the state's diverse indigenous traditions on a guided tour of the Alaska Native Heritage Center. Then enjoy free time downtown for lunch, shopping or just strolling around before the drive along the Turnagain Arm and through the Chugach Mountains to the coast. Your Adventure Specialist will wish you bon voyage as you say goodbye at the ship terminal.

Onboard the Radiance of the Seas

Costco Member Reviews

4.3 of 5 stars4.3/5 (840 Reviews)

Ship Rating

3.5/5

Linger longer in iconic destinations onboard a ship designed for exploration. Dazzling with the most glass of any Royal Caribbean® ship, Radiance of the Seas® is perfect for glacier gazing in Alaska and soaking up the sun in the tropics. When you aren’t chasing adventure onshore, unwind poolside while taking in the views, stretch your muscles on the Rock Climbing Wall, and sing along to show-stopping performances onboard.

Onboard Activities

Activities & Services (included in cruise)

Rock-Climbing Wall

  • Card Room
  • Casino
  • Disco/Nightclub
  • Movies
  • Theater/Show Lounge
  • Fitness Center
  • Sauna/Steam Room
  • Pool - Children's
  • Pool - Outdoor
  • Rock-Climbing Wall
  • Sports Facilities
  • Whirlpool/Jacuzzi
  • Bars/Lounges
  • Library
  • Children's Indoor Play Area
  • Children's Outdoor Play Area
  • Educational Classes
  • Organized Age Specific Activities
  • Teen Center or Disco
  • Teen Programs
  • Business Center
  • Concierge Desk
  • Conference Center
  • Duty-Free Shops/Boutiques
  • Elevators
  • Religious Services
  • Safe Deposit Boxes

Activities & Services (available for an extra fee)

Full-Service Spa

  • Game Arcade
  • Beauty Salon
  • Fitness Classes
  • Full-Service Spa
  • Spa Services/Massage
  • Educational Programs
  • Internet Center
  • Dry Cleaning/ Laundry Service
  • Infirmary/Medical Center
  • Wedding/Vow Renewal

Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the cruise line without notice. Staterooms designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Dining

Main Dining Room

Main Dining

Main Dining Room: Sweeping, multi-level ambience, world-class cuisine and extraordinary personal service from a dedicated wait staff. Royal Caribbean’s main dining room serves exceptional, multi-course meals for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Chops Grille

Specialty Dining

Café Latte-tudes: Caffeine fix, coffee break, or after-dinner cappuccino – drop by this café for sweets, people watching and specialty coffee beverages. This restaurant is available for an additional cost.

Chef's Table: A once-in-a-lifetime culinary experience – join guests in an exclusive enclave to savor a five-course, gourmet menu specially prepared and presented by the Chef de Cuisine. Every course pairs with a wine chosen to enhance your enjoyment of the dish. The menu, wine selections and price vary from ship to ship and itinerary. This restaurant is available for an additional cost.

Chops Grille℠: Royal Caribbean's popular signature steakhouse, featuring grade-A premium cuts of steak cooked to your specifications, plus fresh seafood, hearty side dishes and signature desserts in an upscale, contemporary setting. This restaurant is available for an additional cost.

Giovanni's Table: A casual Italian trattoria with indoor and al fresco seating, Giovanni's Table offers rustic dishes with a contemporary flair, including toasted herb focaccia, pastas, braised meat dishes and stews, served family-style. This restaurant is available for an additional cost.

Izumi: The traditional Japanese dishes at Izumi will impress you with pure, delicate flavors, freshness of ingredients and impeccable presentation. Choose from sushi rolls, sashimi and more. This restaurant is available for an additional cost.

Samba Grill: A churrascaria with personality and flair, featuring a variety of meats and seafoods carved tableside straight from the skewer, plus a wide selection of soups, salads and appetizers at the buffet. This restaurant is available for an additional cost.

Windjammer

Casual Dining

Dog House: How do you build your dog? Take a seat at the counter for traditional hot dogs, brats, sausages and other delicious linked meats, plus a variety of toppings to split a long bun.

Park Cafe: A casual-eats deli cafe offering made-to-order salads, paninis and freshly prepared sandwiches. Don't miss the signature "Kummelweck" roast beef sandwich – a guest favorite.

Sorrento's Pizza: There's nothing more satisfying than a great slice of pizza — and Royal Caribbean has spent years perfecting the recipe at Sorrento's. Whether you're into classics, like cheese and Margherita, or specialty pies, like the meat-loaded Carnivore or the pineapple, bacon and BBQ-infused Caribbean Dream, Sorrento's serves up perfection in every slice.

Windjammer: A culinary destination loaded with an array of delicious food for every meal and snack time – all with spectacular views and a comfortable, casual atmosphere. Browse multiple serving stations featuring pastas, omelettes made-to-order, global cuisine, salads, soups, sandwiches, meat-carving, and tons of tantalizing desserts.

Room Service: Room service is available 24-hours a day (a convenience charge applies to each order placed).


Times, costs and other specifics are outside the control of Costco Travel. All information is at the sole discretion of the cruise line and is subject to change without notice. Dining time and table size preferences are submitted to the cruise line on a first-come, first-served request basis and are confirmed aboard ship. Questions, concerns and/or special needs regarding dining arrangements must be addressed with the maitre d' hotel aboard ship. Every effort is made to accommodate travelers' preferences; however, Costco Travel cannot guarantee dining arrangements. In specialty restaurants, space is limited and reservations are recommended. A cover charge and dress code may apply.

Staterooms

Interior staterooms include a wide array of amenities for your whole family to enjoy.

Interior (Category: 4V)

Category: 4V
Enjoy your vacation in the perfect space.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One single sofa bed in staterooms with up to 3 or 4 guests

Size

  • Stateroom: 170 sq. ft.

Interior (Category: 3V)

Category: 3V
Enjoy your vacation in the perfect space.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One single sofa bed in staterooms with up to 3 or 4 guests

Size

  • Stateroom: 170 sq. ft.

Interior (Category: 2V)

Category: 2V
Enjoy your vacation in the perfect space.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One single sofa bed in staterooms with up to 3 or 4 guests

Size

  • Stateroom: 170 sq. ft.

Interior (Category: 1V)

Category: 1V
Enjoy your vacation in the perfect space.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One single sofa bed in staterooms with up to 3 or 4 guests

Size

  • Stateroom: 170 sq. ft.

Studio Interior (Category: 2W)

Category: 2W
Enjoy your vacation in the perfect space.

Beds

  • One full-size bed

Size

  • Stateroom: 108 sq. ft.

Guarantee - Inside (Category: ZI)

Category: ZI
This category can be booked for a special rate, guaranteed to you. Please note that the category is not associated at the time of booking with a specific stateroom, deck, bedding configuration or other particular settings. The assignment of an actual cabin will be performed during your check-in. The cabin can be anywhere on the ship.

Spectacular sights and amazing views from the comfort of your stateroom.

Ocean View (Category: 4N)

Category: 4N
Gaze into the beautiful views from your cozy room.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 3 or 4 guests

Size

  • Stateroom: 170 sq. ft.

Ocean View (Category: 3N)

Category: 3N
Gaze into the beautiful views from your cozy room.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 3 or 4 guests

Size

  • Stateroom: 170 sq. ft.

Ocean View (Category: 2N)

Category: 2N
Gaze into the beautiful views from your cozy room.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 3 or 4 guests

Size

  • Stateroom: 170 sq. ft.

Ocean View (Category: 1N)

Category: 1N
Gaze into the beautiful views from your cozy room.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 3 or 4 guests

Size

  • Stateroom: 170 sq. ft.

Connecting Ocean View (Category: CO)

Category: CO
Experience a spectacular view for a memorable vacation.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed

Size

  • Stateroom: 170 sq. ft.

Ultra Spacious Ocean View (Category: 1K)

Category: 1K
Have a spectacular view in an immense space with family.

Beds

  • Two two twin beds that convert to a Royal King
  • One double sofa bed
  • One twin bed or two Pullman beds

Size

  • Stateroom: 265 sq. ft.

Spacious Ocean View (Category: 4M)

Category: 4M
Have a spectacular view for a memorable vacation.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed

Size

  • Stateroom: 170 sq. ft.

Guarantee - Oceanview (Category: YO)

Category: YO
This category can be booked for a special rate, guaranteed to you. Please note that the category is not associated at the time of booking with a specific stateroom, deck, bedding configuration or other particular settings. The assignment of an actual cabin will be performed during your check-in. The cabin can be anywhere on the ship.

Enjoy the ambiance of our neighborhood balcony staterooms that overlook the Central Park and Boardwalk neighborhoods or take in breathtaking views from your Ocean View balcony stateroom.

Spacious Ocean View Balcony (Category: 4B)

Category: 4B
Immerse yourself in a gorgeous view for a memorable vacation.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One single sofa bed in staterooms with up to 3 guests
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 4 or 5 guests

Size

  • Stateroom: 204 sq. ft.
  • Balcony: 41 sq. ft.

Spacious Ocean View Balcony (Category: 3B)

Category: 3B
Immerse yourself in a gorgeous view for a memorable vacation.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One single sofa bed in staterooms with up to 3 guests
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 4 or 5 guests

Size

  • Stateroom: 204 sq. ft.
  • Balcony: 41 sq. ft.

Spacious Ocean View Balcony (Category: 2B)

Category: 2B
Immerse yourself in a gorgeous view for a memorable vacation.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One single sofa bed in staterooms with up to 3 guests
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 4 or 5 guests

Size

  • Stateroom: 204 sq. ft.
  • Balcony: 41 sq. ft.

Spacious Ocean View Balcony (Category: 1B)

Category: 1B
Immerse yourself in a gorgeous view for a memorable vacation.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One single sofa bed in staterooms with up to 3 guests
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 4 or 5 guests

Size

  • Stateroom: 204 sq. ft.
  • Balcony: 41 sq. ft.

Connecting Balcony (Category: CB)

Category: CB
Experience a spectacular view for a memorable vacation.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed

Size

  • Stateroom: 179 sq. ft.
  • Balcony: 41 sq. ft.

Ocean View Balcony (Category: 1D)

Category: 1D
Experience a spectacular view for a memorable vacation.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal king bed
  • One single sofa bed in staterooms with up to 3 guests
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 4 guests

Size

  • Stateroom: 179 sq. ft.
  • Balcony: 41 sq. ft.

Ocean View Balcony (Category: 2D)

Category: 2D
Experience a spectacular view for a memorable vacation.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal king bed
  • One single sofa bed in staterooms with up to 3 guests
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 4 guests

Size

  • Stateroom: 179 sq. ft.
  • Balcony: 41 sq. ft.

Ocean View Balcony (Category: 3D)

Category: 3D
Experience a spectacular view for a memorable vacation.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal king bed
  • One single sofa bed in staterooms with up to 3 guests
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 4 guests

Size

  • Stateroom: 179 sq. ft.
  • Balcony: 41 sq. ft.

Ocean View Balcony (Category: 4D)

Category: 4D
Experience a spectacular view for a memorable vacation.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal king bed
  • One single sofa bed in staterooms with up to 3 guests
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 4 guests

Size

  • Stateroom: 179 sq. ft.
  • Balcony: 41 sq. ft.

Ocean View Balcony (Category: 5D)

Category: 5D
Experience a spectacular view for a memorable vacation.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal king bed
  • One single sofa bed in staterooms with up to 3 guests
  • One double sofa bed in staterooms with up to 4 guests

Size

  • Stateroom: 179 sq. ft.
  • Balcony: 41 sq. ft.

Guarantee - Balcony (Category: XB)

Category: XB
This category can be booked for a special rate, guaranteed to you. Please note that the category is not associated at the time of booking with a specific stateroom, deck, bedding configuration or other particular settings. The assignment of an actual cabin will be performed during your check-in. The cabin can be anywhere on the ship.

Exclusive experiences, inclusive amenities, luxury accommodations and more.

Owner's Suite - 2 Bedrooms (Category: OT)

Category: OT
Enjoy the ultimate suite for a perfect vacation with family and friends.

Beds

  • Two sets of two twins beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One double sofa bed

Size

  • Stateroom: 532 sq. ft.
  • Balcony: 66 sq. ft.

Junior Suite (Category: J3)

Category: J3
An incredible intimate suite with a great view.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One double sofa bed

Size

  • Stateroom: 299 sq. ft.
  • Balcony: 66 sq. ft.

Grand Suite - 1 Bedroom (Category: GS)

Category: GS
Enjoy a comfortable suite and the extra perks.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One double sofa bed

Size

  • Stateroom: 385 sq. ft.
  • Balcony: 106 sq. ft.

Royal Suite - 1 Bedroom (Category: RS)

Category: RS
Relish an extraordinary vacation in this luxurious suite.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One double sofa bed

Size

  • Stateroom: 952 sq. ft.
  • Balcony: 172 sq. ft.

Owner's Suite - 1 Bedroom (Category: OS)

Category: OS
Enjoy the ultimate suite for a perfect vacation.

Beds

  • Two twin beds that convert to a Royal King bed
  • One double sofa bed

Size

  • Stateroom: 532 sq. ft.
  • Balcony: 57 sq. ft.

Guarantee - Suite (Category: WS)

Category: WS
This category can be booked for a special rate, guaranteed to you. Please note that the category is not associated at the time of booking with a specific stateroom, deck, bedding configuration or other particular settings. The assignment of an actual cabin will be performed during your check-in. The cabin can be anywhere on the ship.

Deck Plan

Cruise Ship
Deck 13
Key to Symbols
SymbolDescription
Stateroom for occupancy 5 and upStateroom for occupancy 5 and up
Stateroom for occupancy up to 4Stateroom for occupancy up to 4
Accessible stateroomAccessible stateroom
Stateroom has an obstructed viewStateroom has an obstructed view
Stateroom for occupancy up to 3Stateroom for occupancy up to 3

Ship Facts

Radiance of the Seas ship image
  • Ship Name: Radiance of the Seas
  • Year Built: 2001
  • Year Refurbished: 2011
  • Year Entered Present Fleet: 2001
  • Ship Class: Radiance
  • Maximum Capacity: 2,466
  • Number of Passenger Decks: 12
  • Number of Crew: 894
  • Officers' Nationality: Norwegian
  • Ocean-View without Balcony: 247
  • Ocean-View with Balcony: 578
  • Total Inside Staterooms: 246
  • Tonnage (GRT): 90,090
  • Capacity Based on Double Occupancy: 2,143
  • Country of Registry: The Bahamas
  • Total Staterooms: 1,071
  • Suites with Balcony: 64
  • Crew/Hotel Staff Nationality: International
Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the hotel, resort or cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the provider without notice. Hotels, resorts, ships or accommodations designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Reviews

Available Dates & Prices

Terms & Conditions

*Price shown is per person based on double occupancy and is valid for select stateroom categories only. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for details.

†The exact amount of the Costco Shop Card will be calculated during the booking process. Click on the Terms& Conditions link below for additional information.

Ship's registry: The Bahamas

    Package ID: RCIRADALK20220521CT