Europe and Mediterranean: Spain, Italy and Aegean Wonder Voyage

Regent Seven Seas Cruises

Sail into the romance of the Mediterranean and discover ancient worlds and cultural springs of wonder and beauty. Savor the fresh catch of the day with a pristinely aged vintage as you experience each colorful coast.

All-Inclusive Cruise

  • All onboard gratuities

  • Select complimentary shore excursions**

  • Unlimited beverages, including fine wines and premium spirits served throughout the ship

  • In-suite refrigerator replenished daily with soft drinks, beer and bottled water

  • 24-Hour room service

  • No charge for specialty restaurants

  • Welcome bottle of Champagne

  • $100 Shipboard credit per suite††

Executive Member Benefit

  • Executive Members receive an annual 2% Reward, up to $1,000, on qualified Costco Travel purchases

  • Executive Members receive an additional $100 shipboard credit per suite (not combinable with certain past-guest discounts)††

Costco Shop Card

  • Member Exclusive: Costco Shop Card with every Regent Seven Seas Cruises® sailing†

Sailing Itinerary

Note: Cruise itineraries are subject to change. Please verify ports and times directly with the cruise line.

Day 1Port of Call BarcelonaDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Barcelona is a charming, cosmopolitan port on the shores of the Mediterranean sea. This prosperous and bilingual (Spanish and Catalan) metropolis measures up to a city such as Madrid: its museums, theaters, art galleries and nightlife area of an impressive high standard. Besides that, this art and design centre has a lot of interesting sights to offer to its visitors. The best place to watch people go by, to stroll or simply relax, is 'Las Ramblas', a pedestrian street with dozens of outdoor cafes. Here, you’ll find flower-stands, book kiosks and small market stalls where they sell birds and small animals. You’ll also find an endlessly fascinating flowing receptacle of pageant-jugglers, singers, dancers, puppeteers, sidewalk artists, living statues and assorted oddballs on parade. Nearby is 'Plaça Real', with plenty of bars and restaurants, and 'Palau Guell', built by the Catalan architectural genius Antoni Gaudi in his undulating art-nouveau style. After having seen these sights, stroll the narrow winding streets of the 'Barri Gotic', the medieval Gothic quarter full of interesting tapas bars and cafes. Check out Picasso’s old hangout, 'Els Quatre Gats', which has been renovated without losing its bohemian charm. Or head for the old Barceloneta section on the waterfront. This working-class area, which was always slightly rundown and scruffy-looking, is now packed with paella restaurants. The new beach area, which runs from Barceloneta to the Olympic village, is much cleaner than the old beach area. Although some people believe that it has been cleaned up considerably, it might be a wise idea to stay out of the water. Fortunately, the beach itself is already a feast for the eyes (and ears), with its huge and roaring waves.

Day 2Port of Call Marseille Arrival 8:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Marseille, a port city in southern France, has been a crossroads of immigration and trade since its founding by the Greeks circa 600 B.C. At its heart is the Vieux-Port (Old Port), where fishmongers sell their catch along the boat-lined quay. Basilique Notre-Dame-de-la-Garde is a Romanesque-Byzantine church. Modern landmarks include Le Corbusier’s influential Cite Radieuse complex and Zaha Hadid’s CMA CGM Tower.

Day 3Port of Call Monte Carlo Arrival 8:00amDeparture 10:00pm

Overview

With more than 300 days a year of sunshine, residents in Monaco can take advantage of the Mediterranean, and all of its seaside activities. Moreover, Monaco's close proximitiy to the Southern Alps, which are only 1 hour away by car, allows for easy access to the ski slopes.

Day 4Port of Call Livorno Arrival 8:00amDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

Livorno is situated along the coast of the Ligurian Sea, is one of Italy’s most important ports, both as a commercial and touristic port of call, an industrial centre of national importance and, among all of the Tuscan cities, it is generally considered the youngest, even though its territory holds historical testimonies of remote times that have survived the mass bombings of the Second War World. The city, developed from the end of the XVI century upon request of the Medici family, is famous for being the birthplace of prestigious personalities such as Amedeo Modigliani, Pietro Mascagni and Carlo Azeglio Ciampi. In the past, until the first years of the 20th century it was also a tourist destination of international importance for the presence of important seaside and thermal establishments, that give the city its the name of Montecatini-on-the-sea. Livorno, which at the end of the XIX century counted around 100,000 inhabitants and was the 11th most populated city in Italy and the 2nd in Tuscany, in the last decades has had a notable decline in the number of inhabitants and now is the 3rd most populated city in Tuscany after Florence and Prato.

Day 5Port of Call Rome/Civitavecchia Arrival 8:00amDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

Located about 80 kilometers northwest of Rome, the Port of Civitavecchia is the port of Rome and a busy ferry and cargo port serving Italy and southern Europe. Lying on Italy’s eastern shores on the Tyrrhenian Sea, the Port of Civitavecchia has excellent direct connections to Rome. It is an important cruise and ferry port with regular passage to Sardinia, Malta, Sicily, Tunis, and Barcelona. Fishing is of secondary importance to the Port of Civitavecchia. In addition to ocean-going traffic, the Port of Civitavecchia also contains a thermoelectric center and metallurgical works. In 2006, over 51 thousand people called the Port of Civitavecchia home. The Port of Civitavecchia was built on an earlier Etruscan settlement. Emperor Trajan founded the Port of Civitavecchia in the early 2nd Century, calling it Centumcellae. Today, Trajan’s Port is preserved within today’s Port of Civitavecchia. A busy growing town during the late Roman era, the Port of Civitavecchia was attacked by Vandals and then destroyed by the Saracens in 828 AD. Residents escaped to the nearby Allumiere Mountains where Pope Leo IV built a walled town in 854. Eventually, the people returned to Civitavecchia (the name means “old city”). At the end of the 15th Century, the Port of Civitavecchia was under frequent attack by pirates. The naval arsenal was constructed in 1508. Pope Paul III commissioned the building of the keep, which was designed by Donato Bramante and then finished by Michelangelo in 1537, to protect the Port of Civitavecchia from the pirate attacks. In 1696, Civitavecchia became a free port under Pope Innocent XII. Because it was Rome’s main port, the French occupied the Port of Civitavecchia in 1849. The Port of Civitavecchia was linked to Rome by the Rome and Civitavecchia Rail Road in 1859. When the Port of Civitavecchia became part of the Kingdom of Italy in 1870, it was one of the Papal State’s most strongly-fortified towns when Papal troops welcomed General Nino Bixio on behalf of the Italian unification forces into the Port of Civitavecchia fortress. World War II brought destruction to as much as three-quarters of the Port of Civitavecchia. Reconstruction enlarged the Port of Civitavecchia beyond its pre-war area. The Autorita Portuale Civitavecchia (Port of Rome) is responsible for managing and operating the Port of Civitavecchia as well as the ports of Fiumicino and Gaeta. The modern Port of Civitavecchia is at the center of rail, road, and air networks that link it with central Italy and the world. The Port of Civitavecchia has capacity to handle about 11 million tons of cargo per year and over 1.5 million passengers. Cargoes include forest products, cereals, iron and steel, chemicals, automobiles, containers, and liquid bulk. In 2007, the Port of Civitavecchia welcomed 856 cruise vessels carrying 1.6 million passengers, and the total number of passengers using ferries and cruise vessels was 3.8 million. In 2007, the Port of Civitavecchia handled a total of 7.7 million tons of cargo. This total included 1.5 million tons of liquid bulk, 1.7 million tons of solid bulk, 4.6 million tons of packages, and 31.1 thousand TEUs of containerized cargo. The Port of Civitavecchia contains 28 berths of a total 5.6 thousand meters in length with alongside depths from 6 to 18 meters. Port properties include five warehouses containing 36 thousand square meters for handling and storing cargoes. The intermodal terminal includes seven thousand square meters of storage space and 12.5 thousand square meters for loading/unloading rail cars and parking. The Port of Civitavecchia is one of the busiest ferry ports in the world. Just 80 kilometers northwest of Rome, it is the main tourist destination for people traveling to the Eternal City. It is also a central port for ferries carrying passengers to more local destinations. The ferry terminal offers a complete line of amenities. Different ferry companies offer services to the various destinations. Moby Lines handles crossings to Olbia, Sardinia. Corsica Sardinia Ferries runs services to Golfo Aranci. Grimaldi Ferries carries passengers to Barcelona and Tunis, and Grand Navi Veloci operates a route to Tunis. Ferrovie dello Stato operates a combined rail-ferry service to Golfo Aranci.

Day 6Port of Call Amalfi Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Amalfi is a town in a dramatic natural setting below steep cliffs on Italy’s southwest coast. Between the 9th and 11th centuries, it was the seat of a powerful maritime republic. The Arab-Norman Sant'Andrea cathedral at the heart of town, with its striped Byzantine facade, survives from this era. The Museo Arsenale Amalfi is a medieval shipyard-turned-exhibition space.

Day 7 Cruising
Day 8Port of Call Kotor Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Kotor is a fortified town on Montenegro’s Adriatic coast, in a bay near the limestone cliffs of Mt. Lovcen. Characterized by winding streets and squares, its medieval old town has several Romanesque churches, including Kotor Cathedral. It's also home to the Maritime Museum, which explores local seafaring history. Sveti Ðorde, one of 2 tiny islands off the ancient town of Perast, features a centuries-old church.

Day 9Port of Call Split Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

The City of Split marks 1700 years since the beginning of the construction of Diocletian's Palace. Split, a city where every epoche since antiquity has left its traces, was conceived within the walls of the palace which was built by the Roman Emperor Diocletian as his private residence. The well-preserved palace has been listed as UNESCO's register of the worlds cultural heritage. During these 1700 years plus, Split has played an important role in Croatian history. Today, Split is the center of cultural and scientific life, with many institutions, museums, gallerys and theatres. Split is the second biggest city of Croatia. Due to its central position on the Adriatic coast and its exceptional environment, Split soon developed into the leading and biggest city of South Croatia, its large port, commercial and industrial center and an important European touristic resort. The present city of Split is an organic fusion of its antique heritage and of modern architecture, set up in the beautiful Mediterranean environment and full of a sober and thoughtful atmosphere of a big city.As the scientific centre of the region, Split's scientific institutions have had remarkable results in many fields including the protection and study of cultural and natural heritage, oceanography, fishery, Adriatic agricultural cultures, etc. Split is also known for great accomplishments in sports, notably basketball, soccer, tennis, handball, rowing, sailing, and waterpolo. Split hosted the Mediterranean Sport Games and the European Athletic Championships. Split is connected by rail to the hinterland, by ferry boats to the Adriatic islands, Italy and Croatia, and to the rest of the world by its international airport.

Day 10Port of Call Trieste Arrival 9:00am

Overview

Trieste is the capital city of the Friuli Venezia Giulia region in northeast Italy. A port city, it occupies a thin strip of land between the Adriatic coast and Slovenia’s border on the limestone-dominated Karst Plateau. Italian, Austro-Hungarian and Slovenian influences are all evident in its layout, which encompasses a medieval old city and a neoclassical Austrian quarter.

Day 11Port of Call TriesteDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Trieste is the capital city of the Friuli Venezia Giulia region in northeast Italy. A port city, it occupies a thin strip of land between the Adriatic coast and Slovenia’s border on the limestone-dominated Karst Plateau. Italian, Austro-Hungarian and Slovenian influences are all evident in its layout, which encompasses a medieval old city and a neoclassical Austrian quarter.

Day 12Port of Call Urbino Arrival 7:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Urbino is a walled city in central Italy. It's known for the turreted, 15th-century Palazzo Ducale. Inside the palace, the National Gallery of the Marche features paintings by Titian and Raphael, who was born in Urbino. Raphael’s House has more paintings, including ones by the artist’s father. Next to the neoclassical cathedral is the Museo Diocesano Albani, with religious artifacts dating back to the 13th century.

Day 13Port of Call Kotor Arrival 11:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Kotor is a fortified town on Montenegro’s Adriatic coast, in a bay near the limestone cliffs of Mt. Lovcen. Characterized by winding streets and squares, its medieval old town has several Romanesque churches, including Kotor Cathedral. It's also home to the Maritime Museum, which explores local seafaring history. Sveti Ðorde, one of 2 tiny islands off the ancient town of Perast, features a centuries-old church.

Day 14Port of Call Corfu Arrival 10:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Corfu Town (Kerkyra) is a principal port and the largest town in the Ionian islands. It is built between two Venetian castles, having its own unique atmosphere. It is a thriving mass of shops and businesses, set amongst a captivating and charming assortment of elegant buildings, churches, imposing fortresses and narrow alleyways leading to hidden squares. The tall buildings with the 'volta' (arches), the 'cantounia' (narrow flagstoned streets), the 'mouragia' (sea-walls) are showing all a clear Italian influence. One of the most beautiful walks in the town is around the Esplanade (Spianada square), one of the biggest squares in Europe which is the hub of the Corfiot's life. Here you can walk around or sit in one of the many cafe bars underneath the arches of the 'Liston', a name probably derived from a similar promenade in Venice. Liston was built during the imperial French occupation and is reminiscent of the larger 'Arcades' of the Rue de Rivoli in Paris. On the upper side of Esplanade stands a memorial to the British Lord High Commissioner Sir Thomas Maitland, built in 1816 in the shape of a circular building with Ionian columns. The Corfiots call this building 'sterna' (cistern) because this was where the entrance to the largest underground cistern of the town was to be found. Near the Maitland's monument, in front of the building where the Ionian Academy was housed, stands the statue of John Capodistrias, the first President of Greece. It is a work from the end of the 19th century showing the Governor standing deep in thought. Opposite the Liston is the the Old Fortress and 'Anthonas', the Municipal Gardens. In the gardens is the statue of Lord Guilford, showing the founder of the Ionian Academy in his academic robes holding an open book. Nearby are the busts of two famous Corfiots, the poet Lorenzo Mavilis and the writer Dinos Theotokis. At the northern end of Esplanade stands the Palace of St. Michael and St. George, one of the most elegant buildings in Corfu. Opposite the west front of the palace is a beautiful building which now houses the Reading Society of Corfu, the oldest cultural institute in modern Greece, founded in 1836. The Reading Society contains a unique library of Greek and foreign books as well as a large collection of manuscripts, newspapers, periodicals, paintings, maps and engravings mostly related to the Ionian islands. As one's gaze leaves the Esplanade, after lingering on the palace, it embraces a magnificent view towards the coastal road (Arseniou Street) with its sea-walls. Following along this road will take you to the Old Harbour of Corfu and the other Venetian castle, the one called the New Fortress. Along this road the narrow lanes ('cantounia') lead to the Campielo, the oldest quarter of the town. Here the visitor can find the oldest houses and many of the historic churches in Corfu. At the northern end of Capodistria Street stands the Capodistria Mansion, an excellent example of neo-classical architecture. It was built in 1835 by the Corfiot architect John Chronis and is considered one of the most beautiful buildings in Greece. Here John Capodistrias, the first President of Greece, was born. Another notable landmark in the old town is the central market. The most interesting street here is Nickiforou Theotoki as the rows upon rows of 'volta' standing on their stone columns and the tall buildings form one of the most characteristic aspects of Corfu Town. In a little square on Nickiforou Theotoki Street stands the building of the Ionian Bank, which was built in 1846 displaying a well-proportioned facade with finely detailed Ionian pilasters and pediment. On the first floor of the building the Paper Money Museum is housed. At the far end of the square is the Church of St. Spyridon. It shelters the body of St. Spyridon, the patron saint of Corfu and one of the great Saints of Greek Orthodoxy and draws a constant stream of pilgrims from all over Greece every year. On the Evgeniou Voulgareos Street stands the crenellated belfry of the Roman Catholic Church of the Annunciation a venerable building from the end of the 14th century. The whole building was destroyed in the World War II bombing, and the only remains are the belfry, two inscriptions and a bas-relief representing war trophies. Between Evgeniou Voulgareos Street and a modern square stands the most elegant of the Venetian buildings in Corfu, the Town Hall in baroque style. At the end of Moustoxydi Street stands another building of the period of British rule, the historic the Ionian Parliament. At the junction of the Garitsa coastal road and Alexandras Avenue stands the Douglas Obelisk, which also belongs to the same period, erected in honour of the Lord High Commissioner Sir Howard Douglas, to whom Corfu owes a lot of public works and philanthropic institutions.

Day 15 Cruising
Day 16Port of Call Kusadasi Arrival 7:00amDeparture 4:00pm

Overview

This seaside resort town has grown immensely in the last 30 years, and is especially popular with package holiday-makers from Europe. From a population of 6000 in the 1970s, it is now closer to 50,000, although a high proportion of this are part of the tourist industry and here only for the summer. Many cruising ships travelling around the Aegean Islands stop here, especially because of its close proximity (20km) to Selcuk. Kusadasi is a good base to explore this and other ancient cities like Priene and Didyma. Although there is little of historical interest in Kusadasi itself, the town is popular predominantly because of its many hotels, restaurants, souvenir and carpet shops, and lively nightlife. The Kale district has some old traditional houses and narrow streets, and gives some indication of what the town used to be like. The most famous beach is Kadinlar Plaji, 2.5km south of the town, dominated by huge hotels and can get very crowded in summer. There are several small beaches further south, and closer to town is Yilanci Burnu, the peninsular.

Day 17Port of Call Istanbul Arrival 1:00pm

Overview

Istanbul is an international art and cultural center. The International Arts and Cultural Festival is held each year in June and July with famous artists coming from all over the world. These performances are held mostly at the Ataturk Cultural Center. Those who enjoy classical music can hear it at the Cemal Resit Rey Hall. Operas, operettas, ballets, films, concerts, exhibitions and conferences all contribute to the cultural palette of the city. Istanbul also has a rich program of light entertainment. Nightclubs provide splendid entertainment throughout dinner, ranging from a selection of Turkish songs to belly-dancing. Istanbul is a preffered city in terms of international art activities . This is because the art-lovers of Istanbul are respectful to the art and the artist. The famous performance artists feel themselves very comfortable in Istanbul concerts. Because the audience is very well aware of "the rituel of watching an artistic performance." The artist knows that he or she will not come across with impudent or disrespectful behavviours. It is the same for the international picture galleries, biennials, and visual activities. Neither the spectator nor the critic leave their "respectful attitude aganist the artist. " Hence the myths of traditional pop-rock genres, giants of jazz contempoporarylegends of classical western music are always in Istanbul, on the stage. To sum up; Istanbul is a city that can add compassion next to its giant size in terms of living area and population, and siling to assimilate the universal culture while "welcoming" it with utmost hospitality: a "world city" In this case, it deserves to be called "universal culture capital"

Day 18Port of Call IstanbulDeparture 4:00pm

Overview

Istanbul is an international art and cultural center. The International Arts and Cultural Festival is held each year in June and July with famous artists coming from all over the world. These performances are held mostly at the Ataturk Cultural Center. Those who enjoy classical music can hear it at the Cemal Resit Rey Hall. Operas, operettas, ballets, films, concerts, exhibitions and conferences all contribute to the cultural palette of the city. Istanbul also has a rich program of light entertainment. Nightclubs provide splendid entertainment throughout dinner, ranging from a selection of Turkish songs to belly-dancing. Istanbul is a preffered city in terms of international art activities . This is because the art-lovers of Istanbul are respectful to the art and the artist. The famous performance artists feel themselves very comfortable in Istanbul concerts. Because the audience is very well aware of "the rituel of watching an artistic performance." The artist knows that he or she will not come across with impudent or disrespectful behavviours. It is the same for the international picture galleries, biennials, and visual activities. Neither the spectator nor the critic leave their "respectful attitude aganist the artist. " Hence the myths of traditional pop-rock genres, giants of jazz contempoporarylegends of classical western music are always in Istanbul, on the stage. To sum up; Istanbul is a city that can add compassion next to its giant size in terms of living area and population, and siling to assimilate the universal culture while "welcoming" it with utmost hospitality: a "world city" In this case, it deserves to be called "universal culture capital"

Day 19Port of Call Mykonos Arrival 12:00pmDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

Mykonos is world-famous. It is no coincidence that this, the most cosmopolitan of all Greek islands, attracts so many visitors from all over the globe, including large numbers of artists and intellectuals. Here, the steep mountains to be encountered in most of the Cyclades give way to low, rocky hills which combine with superb beaches to make up the landscape of the island. The capital, Hora (Chora), with its colourful harbour in which little fishingboats nestle happily side by side with luxury yachts, presents quite a different picture from the majority of Aegean island towns. While it is usual for island villages to be built on naturally amphitheatrical sites, Mykonos is spread out over a flat area and conveys an impression of lid aesthetic cohesion. Along the whitewashed streets stand brilliant white box-shaped houses with stepped walls for sitting on, wooden doors and windows and brightly-coloured balconies. These are interspersed with small but impressive churches, pretty little tavernas and shops selling souvenirs and other goods, and the overall sense is of being inside a film set. On the low Kastro hill is the complex of churches known collectively as Our Lady 'Paraportiani', a superb arrangement of whitewashed masses created over the centuries and now recognised as a national cultural monument. Of particular historical and aesthetic interest are the medieval houses in this district of the town, which stand like a wall above the sea protecting the west side of Hora. The Archaeological Museum of Hora contains finds from tombs on the nearby island of Rhenia, sculptures, vases and figurines. The Folklore Museum brings together a number of collections of furniture, icons, pieces of sculpture and folk musical instruments. Mykonos is also the home of the Nautical Museum of the Aegean, which has interest all of its own. The countryside of Mykonos is a mixture of grey-green rocks ringed by prickly pear plants and little fertile areas carpeted with wild flowers. Here and there are tiny whitewashed chapels and windmills. Ano Mera is, after Hora, the most important of the older villages on the island. Standing 8 km. to the east of the town, Ano Mera has the interesting monastery of Our Lady Tourliani, ornamented with fine wood-carvings. The church has a collection of valuable ecclesiastical vessels, vestments and embroideries. The courtyard contains an interesting bell-tower and a marble fountain. Here lovers of the sea will find outstanding golden beaches such as Agios Stefanos, Psarou, Kalafatis, Platis Gialos, Ornos, Elia and Panormos. Miykonos is a busy island with all the amenities of a modern resort and with plenty to do - by day or night for those who want to have a lively time. Yet visitors fond of more peaceful holidays will still find quiet corners in which to relax.

Day 20Port of Call Athens/Piraeus Arrival 6:00am

Overview

Today Piraeus is the home base of Greek shipping, the largest commercial fleet in the world, apace bound to the sea like few others. The harbours of Zea and Mikrolimano as well as Phaliro play host to countless yachts and sailing craft throughout the year. Piraeus was known in medieval times as Porto Leone, a name due to the enormous stone lion, which guarded the port's entrance. Today, the life of Piraeus is centred on its three ports: the main, central one and those of Zea and Mikrolimano. You can walk around the central harbour, shared by cargo and passenger ships alike, and watch the constant comings and goings of goods and people from around the world. Having completed your tour of the central harbour of Piraeus you will then head south traversing the peninsula and arrive at Peiraiki, one of the most picturesque neighbour hoods in the city. Here one finds the harbour of Zea, one of the largest marinas in the Mediterranean. If the night finds you in the area, you can try one of the many bars found nearby. You can continue your tour along the waterfront heading towards Kastella but a small deviation toward the city centre will be useful for then you can visit the verdant square of the municipal Theatre with cafeterias and shops of all kinds surrounding it. The magnificent building housing the Municipal Theatre as well as the Town Hall and the Library complete the picture presented by the main square in the city. Piraeus's little natural harbours are among its busiest and most touristy areas: Mikrolimano, Passalimani, Zea, Freatida and Hatzikiriakio. Countless seaside tavernas provide delicious seafood washed down with the uniquely Greek drink, ouzo. The fresh smell of the sea and the sounds made by the assortment of caiques, yachts and sailing ships, which are moored next to the tables, complete the enjoyment of the food Beyond the port, the most impressive spots are the hills of Profitis Ilias and Kastela with their neoclassical mansions and modern buildings which look as they are hanging over the sea.

Onboard the Seven Seas Voyager

Costco Member Reviews

4.7 of 5 stars4.7/5 (127 Reviews)

Ship Rating

4.5/5

A trailblazer in the exclusive world of all-suite, all-balcony ships, Seven Seas Voyager® exceeds even the loftiest expectations for luxury. Considering her size, the amenities are surprisingly plentiful and include four main dining venues where you can dine wherever, whenever and with whomever you choose. With 447 international crew members attending to a maximum 700 guests, personal service is exceedingly indulgent throughout.

Onboard Activities

Activities & Services (included in cruise)

Fitness Center

  • Card Room
  • Disco/Nightclub
  • Movies
  • Fitness Center
  • Sauna/Steam Room
  • Educational Programs
  • Pool - Outdoor
  • Sports Facilities
  • Whirlpool/Jacuzzi
  • Bars/Lounges
  • Library
  • Wi-Fi
  • Organized Age Specific Activities
  • Teen Programs
  • Business Center
  • Concierge Desk
  • Dry Cleaning/ Laundry Service
  • Duty-Free Shops/Boutiques
  • Elevators

Activities & Services (available for an extra fee)

Full-Service Spa

  • Beauty Salon
  • Full-Service Spa
  • Infirmary/Medical Center

Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the cruise line without notice. Staterooms designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Dining

Compass Rose

Specialty Dining

Chartreuse: Featuring a classic French menu with a modern twist, Chartreuse evokes memories of a chic Parisian fine dining restaurant discovered during an evening stroll. Wherever you are seated in this regal restaurant, you will be treated to a succulent dinner while enjoying incredible ocean views. The restaurant ambiance is complemented by a menu that features dishes expertly prepared using both classic and modern techniques for a multiple course celebration of French gastronomy.

Compass Rose: Much thought was given to the design of Compass Rose, the flagship restaurant of Regent Seven Seas fleet. The dining room is outfitted with rich woods contrasted by light marble stones and mother of pearl shimmering brightly with an elegant color theme of light shades of blue, white, gold and silver. Compass Rose delights with a beautifully defined atmosphere and transitions from refreshing natural light during the day to a romantic ice blue lighting theme at night. This is the perfect setting for you to enjoy your breakfast, lunch and dinner, where the menu features an exceptional variety of Continental cuisine.

Prime 7: A true classic in every sense, Prime 7 sets a new standard in steakhouse fare with its contemporary interpretation of an American favorite. Handsomely decorated with supple leather wing-back chairs, burnished woods and rich earth-toned fabrics, Prime 7 exudes a distinct, intimate elegance. All the traditional starters are here, including Jumbo Lump Crab Cakes, Classic Steak Tartare, and Clam Chowder. Of course, beef is the undisputed star, and it is all USDA Prime and Dry-Aged at least 28 days to ensure the ultimate tenderness, juiciness and flavor. Prime New York Strip, Porterhouse Steak and succulent Filet Mignon only touch upon the selections. Mouthwatering alternatives include Alaskan King Crab Legs and Dover Sole. Prime 7 is open for dinner only and reservations are required.

Sette Mari at La Veranda: Each evening, La Veranda transforms into Sette Mari at La Veranda, a casual, intimate dining experience. Enjoy an extensive menu of authentic antipasti and Italian specialties served á la carte and paired with fine Italian wines — complimentary of course. Delectable dishes are prepared á la minute by talented chefs using only the freshest gourmet ingredients and served by attentive waiters. Sette Mari at La Veranda is open for dinner only.

 

Casual Dining

La Veranda Restaurant: Take in stunning ocean views while enjoying elegant breakfast and lunch buffets in the chic indoor dining room or al fresco on the shaded, open-air deck. Breakfasts include traditional favorites, as well as a made-to-order omelet station, a variety of fresh fruits and pastries, along with daily specials, like fluffy Belgian waffles with fresh blueberry compote. For lunch indulge in an array of choices from a bountiful salad bar, gourmet sandwiches, hot carving stations and delicious desserts.

Pool Grill: The Pool Grill is open-air, yet abundantly shaded for comfortable dining. Enjoy grilled-to-order burgers, grilled seafood, sandwiches, and fresh salads. Treat yourself to milkshakes and malts or an old-fashioned hand-dipped ice cream dessert sprinkled with all your favorite toppings.

Room Service: Complimentary 24-hour dining in the comfort of your stateroom.


Times, costs and other specifics are outside the control of Costco Travel. All information is at the sole discretion of the cruise line and is subject to change without notice. Dining time and table size preferences are submitted to the cruise line on a first-come, first-served request basis and are confirmed aboard ship. Questions, concerns and/or special needs regarding dining arrangements must be addressed with the maitre d' hotel aboard ship. Every effort is made to accommodate travelers' preferences; however, Costco Travel cannot guarantee dining arrangements. In specialty restaurants, space is limited and reservations are recommended. A cover charge and dress code may apply.

Staterooms

Features a European king-size bed, a sitting area, a marble bathroom, a walk-in closet and a balcony. Concierge Level is available.

Deluxe Suite (Category: H)

Category: H
356 sq.ft.; 306 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Deluxe Suite (Category: G)

Category: G
356 sq.ft.; 306 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Deluxe Suite (Category: F)

Category: F
356 sq.ft.; 306 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Spacious suites feature an in-suite iPad, daily canapés and upgraded bathroom amenities.

Penthouse Suite (Category: A)

Category: A
Penthouse Suites include Butler Service; 370 sq.ft.; 320 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Penthouse Suite (Category: B)

Category: B
Penthouse Suites include Butler Service; 370 sq.ft.; 320 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Penthouse Suite (Category: C)

Category: C
386 sq.ft.; 306 sq.ft.; Balcony: 115-198 sq.ft.

Concierge Suite (Category: D)

Category: D
356 sq.ft.; 306 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Concierge Suite (Category: E)

Category: E
356 sq.ft.; 306 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Master Suite (Category: MS)

Category: MS
2 bedrooms; Master Suites include Butler Service; 1335 sq.ft.; 1152 sq.ft.; Balcony: 183 sq.ft.

Grand Suite (Category: GS)

Category: GS
Butler service; 876 sq.ft.; 753 sq.ft.; Balcony: 123 sq.ft.

Voyager Suite (Category: VS)

Category: VS
Voyager Suites include butler service; 604 sq.ft.; 554 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Seven Seas Suite (Category: SS)

Category: SS
Seven Seas Suites include Butler Service; 545 sq.ft.; 495 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Deck Plan

Cruise Ship
Deck 12
Key to Symbols
SymbolDescription
Three guest capacity suite, convertible sofa bedThree guest capacity suite, convertible sofa bed
Wheelchair accessible suites have shower stall instead of bathtubWheelchair accessible suites have shower stall instead of bathtub
Connecting suitesConnecting suites
2-bedroom suite accommodates up to 6 guests2-bedroom suite accommodates up to 6 guests

Ship Facts

Seven Seas Voyager ship image
  • Ship Name: Seven Seas Voyager
  • Year Built: 2003
  • Year Refurbished: 2016
  • Year Entered Present Fleet: 2008
  • Ship Class: Mariner
  • Maximum Capacity: 700
  • Number of Passenger Decks: 9
  • Number of Crew: 447
  • Officers' Nationality: International
  • Tonnage (GRT): 42,363
  • Capacity Based on Double Occupancy: 700
  • Country of Registry: The Bahamas
  • Total Staterooms: 350
  • Suites with Balcony: 350
  • Crew/Hotel Staff Nationality: European/International
Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the hotel, resort or cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the provider without notice. Hotels, resorts, ships or accommodations designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Reviews

Available Dates & Prices

Departure Date

Inside Stateroom

Ocean View Stateroom

Balcony Stateroom

Suite Stateroom

Departure Date - 04/19/2023

Inside Stateroom

N/A

Ocean View Stateroom

N/A

Balcony Stateroom

$16,799

Suite Stateroom

$18,099

Terms & Conditions

*Price shown is per person based on double occupancy, is valid for select stateroom categories only, and does include government taxes/fees and gratuities. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for details.

**Select complimentary shore excursions are for full-fare guests only, capacity controlled and subject to availability. Shore excursion reservations are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. Please note, available excursions vary by sailing date and day of the week. Government fees and taxes are included. Requested excursions may not be available at time of booking. Supplement will apply on Regent Choice excursions and excludes Private Arrangements and all Adventures Ashore programs. Restrictions apply and penalties apply 36 hours prior to shore excursion start date.

††All shipboard credit is in U.S. dollars, is per stateroom based on double occupancy, has no cash value, is nontransferable and not redeemable for cash.

†The exact amount of the Costco Shop Card will be calculated during the booking process. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for additional information.

Ship's registry: The Bahamas

    Package ID: RSSVOYEUR20230419