Europe and Mediterranean: Rolling on the Rhine Cruise

U by Uniworld

Amsterdam is just the beginning. On this cruise along the Rhine river, you'll have three days to spend in this laid-back and forward-thinking Dutch hotspot, along with stops in the port-town of Hoorn, urban Cologne, and winegrowing Rüdesheim. You'll spend several nights out on the town. And you'll get your fix of famous artwork, incredible scenery, Dutch cheese, German beer and so much more on this in-depth look into European history and culture.

Included Extras

  • All gratuities for onboard services

  • Wine and beer included with meals

  • Shore excursions with local experts as your guide

  • Internet and Wi-Fi

  • All arrival and departure day transfers

Executive Member Benefit

  • Executive Members earn an annual 2% Reward on Costco Travel purchases

  • Receive a $50 shipboard credit per person (maximum $100 per stateroom)♦

Costco Shop Card

  • Member Exclusive: Costco Shop Card with every Uniworld river cruise†

Sailing Itinerary

Note: Cruise itineraries are subject to change. Please verify ports and times directly with the cruise line.

Day 1Amsterdam

Overview

Amsterdam is the Netherlands’ capital, known for its artistic heritage, elaborate canal system and narrow houses with gabled facades, legacies of the city’s 17th-century Golden Age. Its Museum District houses the Van Gogh Museum, works by Rembrandt and Vermeer at the Rijksmuseum, and modern art at the Stedelijk. Cycling is key to the city’s character, and there are numerous bike paths.

Day 2Amsterdam

Overview

Amsterdam is the Netherlands’ capital, known for its artistic heritage, elaborate canal system and narrow houses with gabled facades, legacies of the city’s 17th-century Golden Age. Its Museum District houses the Van Gogh Museum, works by Rembrandt and Vermeer at the Rijksmuseum, and modern art at the Stedelijk. Cycling is key to the city’s character, and there are numerous bike paths.

Day 3Hoorn

Overview

Somewhere around 1300 AD farmers and fishermen founded the tiny village of Hoorn, strategically located in a bend on the Westfrisian coast where the Gouw River met the old Zuiderzee, now called IJsselmeer. By 1356 the place was already of such importance that it was given city-rights by Count Willem V. In 1426 walls were build to protect the city. The walls included four gates, from which only one survives today. As more merchants and bargemen moved into the place the town slowly grew bigger and bigger. Nowadays thousands of tourists from all over the world flock to this historical city, which not only offers the visitor a unique feel of its glorious past, but good shopping and great watersport facilities as well. The latest, and very striking, addition to the town is a brand-new Theatre House right on its waterfront. Hoorn is located only 35 km. north of Amsterdam and is easily accessible by train, bus or boat. All sights in the city can be covered on foot in less than a day.

Day 4Wesel

Overview

The city originated from a Franconian manor that was first recorded in the 8th century. In the 12th century, the Duke of Clèves took possession of Wesel. The city became a member of the Hanseatic League during the 15th century. Wesel was second only to Cologne in the lower Rhine region as an entrepôt. It was an important commercial centre: a clearing station for the transshipment and trading of goods.

Day 5Koblenz

Overview

At a glance, the city of Koblenz reflects all the typical military clichés in German history. Ritter des Deutschen Ordens (Knights of the German Order) settled at the confluence of the rivers Mosel and Rhine and named the tip of land between the two bodies of water the “Deutsches Eck” (German Corner). There, the German Emperor Wilhelm I reigns on his bronze battle horse while looking down imperiously from his monument’s pedestal on the two rivers flowing together in front of him, the Rhine and the Mosel. On the other bank of the Rhine, the threatening Prussian fortress, Ehrenbreitstein is visible. This side of Koblenz reminds us of military and war, of sables rattling and canon shots thundering. The green hills of the Eifel region, of Hunsrück, Taunus and Westerwald meet where the Mosel flows into the Rhine. Facing the monument at Deutsches Eck back in 1930, the satirist Kurt Tucholsky called it the “gigantic cake decoration” and found that the area was much too pretty for this “rocky clump”. Deutsches Eck, the Emperor’s monument and the Prussian fortress still attract many tourists to the city every day. The buzzing of video cameras and snapping of pictures sometimes even drown the clamor of international voices. Surely the labyrinth of winding little streets in the romantic old city center has utterly delighted many a Japanese traveler and then, driven them to resignation and despair. With eyes on the binoculars at all times, the enthused visitors from the Far East can easily lose their orientation and get lost, only to find themselves in one of the many wine bars and then, surrendering to their fate, trying to console themselves with many pints of wine from the Rhine or Mosel region. This all wouldn’t be necessary if visitors from faraway Nippon would consult a handy travel guide by Karl Baedecker, who currently runs the travel publishing house, Baedecker, in Koblenz. But the palatable regional wine doesn’t particularly care whether it is drunk with or without the travel guide. And neither do the dozens of local bar owners. The bar and restaurant owners in Koblenz may be pleased about the money the tourists spend when visiting the city, but otherwise during high season, the 110,000 inhabitants avoid the old city center overrun with tourists. The inhabitants of Koblenz don’t have much time for tourist leisure, as people seem to work a great deal. The Rhine harbor, industry, the service sector, and of course, the numerous public authorities of the state of Rheinland-Pfalz, as well as the Federal Republic of Germany, are places where the people earn their daily bread. In Koblenz, 12,000 members of the German armed forces fulfill their daily duties. The concentration of military in the city has always been a characteristic of Koblenz, from the Roman times until the present. The situation wasn’t always rosy for the city on the Rhine and Mosel. During the World War Two, destiny struck at the gates of the city like Ludwig van Beethoven’s 5th Symphony. Allied bombers blew Koblenz, an important military center, into debris and ashes. Speaking of Beethoven, Maria Magdalena, the composer’s mother was born on Wambachstrasse in Koblenz. Nowadays you can visit the largest private Beethoven exhibition in the world here. One of the contemporaries for whom Ludwig van Beethoven felt the deepest contempt was Prince Metternich. The conservative hard-liner of the 18th century was born in Koblenz in 1773. It’s strange how time passes and history evolves in one place. To have a sense of this change, just think of the new university campus at Koblenz. It was once a place where military commands were bellowed and now its a quiet place for academics. An old barrack complex hosts students and professors. And Where? In Metternich, a district of Koblenz.

Day 6Rudesheim am Rhein

Overview

Rüdesheim is among the Rhine's most delightful towns. The lively Drosselgasse, a narrow cobbled lane, is renowned for its cozy restaurants and wine taverns filled with music and merriment. The grand 16th century Bromserhof houses a fascinating collection of mechanical musical instruments, while the 10th century Bromserberg Castle serves as a museum of the Rheingau wine region's bounty.

Day 7Frankfurt am Main

Overview

Frankfurt am Main is the largest city in the German state of Hesse and the fifth largest city of Germany. Situated on the Main River, it has a population of approximately 650,000 (but about 5 million in its metropolitan area). Among English speakers it is usually known as simply Frankfurt, but Germans call it by its full name so as to distinguish it from another Frankfurt in Germany, Frankfurt an der Oder. It was once called Frankfort-on-Main in English, a direct translation of Frankfurt am Main. The three pillars of Frankfurt's economy are finance, trade fairs, and transport; it is the transport hub of Germany. Frankfurt has been Germany's financial capital for centuries. Frankfurt is often called "Bankfurt" or "Mainhattan" (derived from the local Main River). It is one of only three European cities that have a significant number of high-rise skyscrapers. With 9 skyscrapers taller than 150 meters (492 feet) in 2004, Frankfurt is second behind Paris (La Défense and Montparnasse: 12 skyscrapers taller than 150 meters, not counting the Eiffel Tower), but ahead of London (Canary Wharf and City: 8 skyscrapers taller than 150 meters). The city of Frankfurt contains the tallest skyscraper in Europe, the Commerzbank Tower. In Germany, only Frankfurt and Düsseldorf have high-rise skyscrapers. Frankfurt is renowned for its finance industry, on a par with London and Paris, as well as for its central location in Western Europe, surrounded by the most populous areas of Europe. It has a first-class infrastructure and a major international airport: Frankfurt International Airport. It is the second or third busiest in Europe, depending on the data used. Passenger traffic at in 2003 was 48,351,664, second in Europe behind London Heathrow Airport (63,487,136), almost in a tie with Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport (48,220,436). Frankfurt has a huge number of institutions, among them its university, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, as well as a number of museums, most of them lined up along the Main river on the Museumsufer (museum shore) and a large botanical garden, the Palmengarten. The best-known museums are the Städelsches Kunstinstitut und Städtische Galerie, called Städel, and the Naturmuseum Senckenberg. The Museum für moderne Kunst (Museum of Modern Art) and Schirn Kunsthalle (Schirn Art Galery) are also notable.

Day 8Frankfurt am Main

Overview

Frankfurt am Main is the largest city in the German state of Hesse and the fifth largest city of Germany. Situated on the Main River, it has a population of approximately 650,000 (but about 5 million in its metropolitan area). Among English speakers it is usually known as simply Frankfurt, but Germans call it by its full name so as to distinguish it from another Frankfurt in Germany, Frankfurt an der Oder. It was once called Frankfort-on-Main in English, a direct translation of Frankfurt am Main. The three pillars of Frankfurt's economy are finance, trade fairs, and transport; it is the transport hub of Germany. Frankfurt has been Germany's financial capital for centuries. Frankfurt is often called "Bankfurt" or "Mainhattan" (derived from the local Main River). It is one of only three European cities that have a significant number of high-rise skyscrapers. With 9 skyscrapers taller than 150 meters (492 feet) in 2004, Frankfurt is second behind Paris (La Défense and Montparnasse: 12 skyscrapers taller than 150 meters, not counting the Eiffel Tower), but ahead of London (Canary Wharf and City: 8 skyscrapers taller than 150 meters). The city of Frankfurt contains the tallest skyscraper in Europe, the Commerzbank Tower. In Germany, only Frankfurt and Düsseldorf have high-rise skyscrapers. Frankfurt is renowned for its finance industry, on a par with London and Paris, as well as for its central location in Western Europe, surrounded by the most populous areas of Europe. It has a first-class infrastructure and a major international airport: Frankfurt International Airport. It is the second or third busiest in Europe, depending on the data used. Passenger traffic at in 2003 was 48,351,664, second in Europe behind London Heathrow Airport (63,487,136), almost in a tie with Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport (48,220,436). Frankfurt has a huge number of institutions, among them its university, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, as well as a number of museums, most of them lined up along the Main river on the Museumsufer (museum shore) and a large botanical garden, the Palmengarten. The best-known museums are the Städelsches Kunstinstitut und Städtische Galerie, called Städel, and the Naturmuseum Senckenberg. The Museum für moderne Kunst (Museum of Modern Art) and Schirn Kunsthalle (Schirn Art Galery) are also notable.

Onboard the The A

Costco Member Reviews

4.8 of 5 stars4.8/5 (32 Reviews)

Not Yet Rated

The A makes her home on the Rhine, Main and Danube rivers, flowing through the Netherlands and Central Europe. She’s sleek and sophisticated giving guests access to the heart of the city, local food, lively onboard atmosphere, and immersive activities.

Onboard Activities

Activities & Services (included in cruise)

Sundeck

  • Disco/Nightclub
  • Fitness Center
  • Fitness Classes
  • Local celebrity DJ party with silent disco
  • Wine tasting classes
  • Mixology classes
  • Excursions
  • U Bikes
  • Bars/Lounges
  • Teen Center or Disco
  • Concierge Desk
  • Duty-Free Shops/Boutiques
  • Safe Deposit Boxes

Activities & Services (available for an extra fee)

Ice Bar

  • Spa Services/Massage
  • Movie rentals
  • U Time Optional Excursions
  • Ice Bar
  • Dry Cleaning/ Laundry Service

Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the cruise line without notice. Staterooms designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Dining

Dine

Main Dining

Dine: Your cruise included two meals a day at this main restaurant on the downstairs deck: brunch and dinner. Meals change daily and feature a range of locally-inspired and farm-to-table dishes, including vegetarian and vegan options. The restaurant is open seating, with a combination of communal tables, high tables and small tables – allowing guests to change their dining companions each day as they meet new friends, or join the same group time after time.

Casual Dining

U Lounge: This always-open lounge on the upstairs deck serves tapas-style sharing plates and after-hours snacks. The bar is open during the day and late into the evening.


Times, costs and other specifics are outside the control of Costco Travel. All information is at the sole discretion of the cruise line and is subject to change without notice. Dining time and table size preferences are submitted to the cruise line on a first-come, first-served request basis and are confirmed aboard ship. Questions, concerns and/or special needs regarding dining arrangements must be addressed with the maitre d' hotel aboard ship. Every effort is made to accommodate travelers' preferences; however, Costco Travel cannot guarantee dining arrangements. In specialty restaurants, space is limited and reservations are recommended. A cover charge and dress code may apply.

Staterooms

Studio (Window) (Category: SU)

Category: SU

  • 128 sq.ft – 12 sq.m
  • Classic bedrooms include waterfront views, super comfy Savoir mattresses, built-in Bluetooth speakers, flat-screen TVs, plenty of outlets with a variety of plugs (including USB ports), ample storage space, and a safe.

Suite (French Balcony) (Category: S)

Category: S

  • 256 sq.ft – 23.8 sq.m
  • Suites include a French balcony with waterfront views, super comfy Savoir mattresses, built-in Bluetooth speakers, flat-screen TVs, plenty of outlets with a variety of plugs (including USB ports), a desk, table and chairs, extra storage space, and a safe.

Deck Plan

Cruise Ship
Rooftop
Key to Symbols
SymbolDescription
Triple occupancyTriple occupancy

Ship Facts

The A ship image
  • Ship Name: The A
  • Year Built: 1994
  • Year Refurbished: 2018
  • Year Entered Present Fleet: 2004
  • Ship Class: U by Uniworld
  • Maximum Capacity: 124
  • Number of Passenger Decks: 2
  • Number of Crew: 34
  • Officers' Nationality: European
  • Ocean-View without Balcony: 31
  • Ocean-View with Balcony: 26
  • Capacity Based on Double Occupancy: 124
  • Country of Registry: The Netherlands
  • Total Staterooms: 61
  • Suites with Balcony: 4
  • Crew/Hotel Staff Nationality: European
Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the hotel, resort or cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the provider without notice. Hotels, resorts, ships or accommodations designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Reviews

Terms & Conditions

*Price shown is per person based on double occupancy and is valid for select stateroom categories only. Click on Terms & Conditions link below for details.

♦Executive Members receive a $50 shipboard credit per person, maximum $100 per stateroom. Executive Member benefit is valid for primary cardholder only. Shipboard credit is per stateroom based on double occupancy. Shipboard credit will be applied to your onboard account. Any unused portion of the credit is nontransferable, nonrefundable and may not be redeemed for cash.

†The exact amount of the Costco Shop Card will be calculated during the booking process. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for additional information.

Ship's registry: The Netherlands

    Package ID: UNITHEAEUR20220521