World Cruise: Grand Spice Route Quest Voyage

Regent Seven Seas Cruises

Magnificent, impressive and awe-inspiring are excellent synonyms for grand, and you will need all of them to describe your Grand Voyage. Circumnavigate continents, cross the world's great oceans, explore a vast diversity of cultures and discover centuries of history, one leisurely day at a time.

All-Inclusive Cruise

  • All onboard gratuities

  • Select complimentary shore excursions**

  • Unlimited beverages, including fine wines and premium spirits served throughout the ship

  • In-suite refrigerator replenished daily with soft drinks, beer and bottled water

  • 24-Hour room service

  • No charge for specialty restaurants

  • Welcome bottle of Champagne

  • $100 Shipboard credit (per suite)††

Executive Member Benefit

  • Executive Members receive an annual 2% Reward, up to $1,000, on qualified Costco Travel purchases

  • Executive Members receive an additional $100 shipboard credit (per suite, not combinable with certain past-guest discounts)††

Costco Shop Card

  • Executive Members earn an annual 2% Reward on Costco Travel purchases

Sailing Itinerary

Note: Cruise itineraries are subject to change. Please verify ports and times directly with the cruise line.

Day 1Port of Call AucklandDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Auckland is New Zealand's largest city, with a population of just under 382,000 within the city boundary and 1.18 million in the greater Auckland area. This represents about one third of the population of the whole country. The city and suburbs cover an area of 60 square kilometres, with many of the suburbs having their own unique character. The city is built on a narrow isthmus between two harbours, the Waitemata to the East and the Manukau to the West. Water sports are a pastime enjoyed by a large number of Aucklanders and the city enjoys the reputation as being known as the 'City of Sails' due the number of yachts which sail in the harbours and the adjoining Hauraki Gulf.

Day 2Port of Call Bay of Islands/New Zealand Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

The Bay of Islands is the finest Maritime Park in New Zealand with 144 islands, secluded bays and an abundance of marine life. It is the cradle of European civilisation in New Zealand and has fine examples of Maori culture for you to experience. The scenery is nothing short of spectacular and can only be fully appreciated by cruising through the area. The area is the warmest part of New Zealand. The Maritime Park is a natural wonderland with an abundance of wildlife including marlin, whales, penguins, dolphins, gannets and many other species. The towns of Paihia and picturesque Russell are perfect places to wander amongst the many shops and restaurants along the waterfront. There are endless activities too - fishing, forest and beach walks, all kinds of water sports and great golf courses. The Bay is the perfect base from which to explore further North. See the magnificent Kauri forests, Cape Reinga - the top of New Zealand, 90 Mile Beach and the craft shops of Kerikeri.

Day 3 Cruising
Day 4 Cruising
Day 5Port of Call Sydney/Australia Arrival 12:00pm

Overview

Sydney is Australia's largest and most cosmopolitan city and is the capital of New South Wales, the most heavily populated state of Australia. Sydney is situated on one of the world's most beautiful and famous harbours. Sydney also boasts beautiful beaches, fantastic shops, restaurants, history and culture. Sydney's many highlights include the Harbour Bridge, the Opera House, Centrepoint Tower, The Rocks, the stunning harbour and the white sands of Bondi, Manly and beyond. Sydney is also home to beautiful National Parks, the Royal Botanic Gardens, many harbour front picnic locations and heritage areas.

Day 6Port of Call Sydney/AustraliaDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Sydney is Australia's largest and most cosmopolitan city and is the capital of New South Wales, the most heavily populated state of Australia. Sydney is situated on one of the world's most beautiful and famous harbours. Sydney also boasts beautiful beaches, fantastic shops, restaurants, history and culture. Sydney's many highlights include the Harbour Bridge, the Opera House, Centrepoint Tower, The Rocks, the stunning harbour and the white sands of Bondi, Manly and beyond. Sydney is also home to beautiful National Parks, the Royal Botanic Gardens, many harbour front picnic locations and heritage areas.

Day 7Port of Call Newcastle/Australia Arrival 7:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Newcastle, New South Wales, is Australia's 6th largest city and an important port. The city is located about 160 kilometres north of Sydney. Despite the city's coal-mining and industrial heritage it has plenty of interesting sights to offer, not the least being the convict ruins and fine Victorian architecture. The city's fine white sandy beaches are regarded as some of the finest in Australia, not to mention Hawaii to where Newcastle sends most of the sand exported each year. By-the-way the surfing is pretty good too, as Mark Richards, one of Australia's finest surfers can testify. As most coal-mining in Newcastle was underground, a legacy of the coal mining companies are the large areas of eucalyptus forested hills which provide a wonderful green backdrop to the many vistas. One of the finest is the view west as the sun sets behind Mount Sugarloaf. Newcastle's very hilly terrain also provides many people in the suburbs with fine views of the coastline and out to sea where many coal carriers await their turn for loading. The coal export capacity of the port makes it one of the larger coal ports in the world now, but with its continuing and rapid expansion will one day be the world's largest. Prior to the city's founding, the area was occupied by the local Koori tribes. The Hunter River and surrounding estuarine waters of Lake Macquarie and Fullerton Cove were rich with marine-life. These tribes apparently had a very intricate trading network with inland tribes. The mouth of the Hunter River by which the present day city of Newcastle is sited, was discovered in 1797 by Lieutenant John Shortland RN. After the discovery of coal in 1799, a settlement was founded in 1801 as a penal colony, however this was abandoned in 1802. In March 1804, Lieutenant Charles Menzies arrived at the mouth of the Hunter River to re-establish the settlement. This was named Newcastle by Governor King, but for many years until around 1830, the settlement was known as "King's Town". The convicts principally mined coal, but also cut timber and burnt lime to supply the growing Sydney Town to the south. Newcastle gained a reputation for being one of the most brutal outposts of the convict system. As more free settlers moved into the Hunter Valley from 1820 onwards, most of the convicts were removed allowing Newcastle to be declared a free town in 1824. Despite the status of Newcastle as a free town, the growth in the population remained very slow. In the years leading up to the 1850s the Australian Agricultural Company held a monopoly of the town's coal production. Convicts were the initial workforce, but due to their lack of mining skills and laziness, even under the harsh conditions, the company sought free settlers from overseas to mine the coal. Thus the new immigrants to Newcastle mainly consisted of Welsh and Cornish people. After 1847 other coal companies were allowed to mine Newcastle's coal. This was also the year that according to the Hunter Valley Research Foundation, Newcastle was proclaimed a City. It was also during 1847, that the Anglican Diocese of Newcastle was founded by Royal Letters Patent. The initial boundaries of the new See were defined: From the Hawkesbury River in the South, to the 21st Parallel of Latitude on the North, and from the Pacific on the East, to the boundary of South Australia - the 141st degree of Longitude - on the West. This area has subsequently been diminished through the creation of new Dioceses. On the 29th June, St. Peter's Day, of 1847, the Reverend William Tyrrell was consecrated in Westminster Abbey as the first Bishop of Newcastle and on the 30th January of the following year (Dr. Tyrrell's 41st birthday) he was installed in the Cathedral at Newcastle. For more information about the Anglican Diocese of Newcastle and its history, visit here. There were apparently still many Koori people living in the area until the 1850s. Disease, famine and marginalisation by the new settlers brought about their ultimate demise and therefore disappearance from the area. Before the monopoly of the Australian Agricultural Company was curtailed, the town's growth was very slow. By 1856 there were still only 1,534 people. With the influx of the new coal companies and the migrants to work for them, Newcastle's population began to rapidly grow so that by 1880 it was larger than Hobart, the Capital of Tasmania. Like many other areas in Australia the city suffered greatly in the depression of the 1890s. It was not until the advent of World War I, and the establishment of the BHP Steelworks in 1915, did Newcastle recover. Newcastle was a major industrial city of Australia during the 1930s through to the 1980s. Many smaller allied industries to the Steelworks were swallowed by the growing giant of BHP, which has since become a transnational company, as the steelmaking process was streamlined throughout the 1930s to the 1950s. The 1960s saw the zenith of the plant, with its capacity being the highest in the world. Rationalisation of industry in Australia in the 1980s saw the loss of many manufacturing jobs, particularly those allied with steelmaking. The city has increasingly become a service centre with the majority of jobs now in the tertiary sector. Newcastle now has a population of over 300,000 people and overall services a population of 500,000 people who reside in the Hunter Valley Region of New South Wales. The major employment areas for the population now lie in the health and education areas. Still with a heavy emphasis on its manufacturing institutions however, Newcastle was dealt a massive blow on 29th April, 1997. It was announced on that day that BHP would close the Steelworks. This resulted in the loss of 2,500 workers over the next three years, and the potential loss of 8,000 more jobs in allied industries. Was this the death blow though? Well as the tertiary sector now employs most working people, this did not have as great an impact as first thought. Newcastle is now reinventing itself, finding new ways to employ people. One up side of the closure of the BHP Steelworks has been the increased cleanliness of the city, drawing in many people to visit and also to move permanently to Newcastle. The city has many fine institutions, the largest being the University of Newcastle. Newcastle has many other sights and events worth a visit. There are Jazz festivals, Show week and the Mattara festival which form just a few of the important events in the cultural life of Newcastle. The city has a vibrant nightlife: fine restaurants, theatres for movies and plays, concert halls, and nightclubs. The city's citizens (called Novocastrians) are also very proud of their sporting deeds. Every weekend you can see Mums and Dads urging their children to play faster and harder. With their strong working-class ethic and fierce loyalty, Novocastrians always provide good support for their sporting teams, no matter what the game. And no matter what the game, all visiting teams fear playing Newcastle on its home turf. This though is only the surface of a typical Novocastrian. If you are lost or waylaid there are plenty of kind hearted citizens to help you out. In many ways Newcastle is really just a big country town. In 1997, Novocastrians celebrated the bicentenary of the European discovery of Newcastle and its harbour.

Day 8 Cruising
Day 9 Cruising
Day 10Port of Call Townsville Arrival 11:00amDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

Townsville, in North Queensland is Australia's largest tropical city. It has an urban population of 130,000 and is renowned for its magnificent climate, consistantly recording more than 300 dry sunny days each year. The city is a charming blend of old and new, with a rich history and surprising cultural depth. It has many well preserved civic commercial and domestic buidings dating back to the region's European settlement in the late 19th century. Townsville offers easy access to many attractions, to the Great Barrier Reef and World Heritage rainforests, together with islands that range from the uninhabited to those with world class resorts. The wonderfully authentic goldfish city of Charters Towers is just 90 minutes easy drive from Townsville and is a virtual ''time capsule''of Victorian, Edwardian and Australian colonial architecture. It also marks the start of the Aussie Outback, with it's unique native animals and herds of free ranging cattle. Townsville is the ''real'' Australia - with a relaxed, friendly lifestyle that offers a warm greeting to visitors. It also offers a diversity of experience that range from the excitement of the Breakwater Casino and the worlds largest living reef aquarium, through to the natural beauty of Magnetic Island and some of the worlds best marlin fishing and scuba diving.

Day 11Port of Call Cairns Arrival 8:00amDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

The far north of Queensland is nestled amongst the tropical background of Australia’s rare rain forests and internationally acclaimed Great Barrier Reef. Recognised for the charm and friendly hospitality of the local people, North Queensland has an array of holiday experiences and attractions to offer year round. Cairns Far North Queensland is the perfect escape for nature lovers with spectacular National Parks abundant with amazing bird and animal life. While the more adventurous can dive the Great Barrier Reef, raft the rapids of the Baron River or rappel down a ravine. Cairns situated on the coast is often described as the jewel of North Queensland. It is also the gateway to the magnificent natural attractions of the whole region extending from the northern most point of Queensland out to Gulf Savannah in the west and down to Townsville another major city of North Queensland not to be missed. These two cities offer the pinnacle of dining and nightlife with a unique North Queensland flavour. Cairns has been called paradise by many because of its location, beauty of the reef and spectacular scenery of the hinterland that surrounds this coastal city. In Cairns you will discover an amazing array of cultures. Charming seafront walking paths and the new fantastic Esplanade redevelopment project adds such character to this charming city. Restaurants, cafes, cosmopolitan shopping and activities are an everyday event in this bustling town. Only a short drive away you come to Cairns northern beaches which will delight anyone. This is the place to ride horses, sail, windsurf or relax under a palm tree and watch the colours of the sky change as the sun sets. The beaches are made up of Machans, Holloways, Yorkeys Knob, Trinity, Palm Cove and Ellis Beaches. Each is a small separate township with its own distinctive character. Together, the beachside towns provide much of Cairns accommodation. From the beaches to the mountains, a day trip up to Atherton Tablelands will be spectacular where you can canoe on freshwater lakes, shop in craft stores and view some of the majestic views across the mountains to the sea. The rainforests of the Wet Tropics have been described as a ‘living museum’ of flora and fauna and were placed on the World Heritage List in 1988. The Wet Tropics cover an area of almost 9000,000 hectares of rainforest and tropical vegetation. Previously unidentified species of birds, insects and mammals have been discovered from within these rainforests delighting biologists and nature lovers alike. The local history, culture and tropical lifestyle are to be truly envied and enjoyed when visiting North Queensland. There is a diverse mix of cultures and people that are proud to call this area home. The first inhabitants were the Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islanders who fished and hunted the abundant wildlife of the region, then came the Dutch navigators and Captain James Cook, who claimed the land for Britain and instrumented the settlement of European communities. The tropical climate encourages an outdoor lifestyle with the famous Queensland barbeque influencing cuisine in the tropics. Exotic fruits and spectacular seafood are also a normal way of eating when visiting or living in the North.

Day 12 Cruising
Day 13Port of Call Thursday Island Arrival 7:00amDeparture 2:00pm

Overview

Thursday Island situated approximately 39 kilometres off the top of Cape York. T.I, as the islands' more affectionately known by the locals, is nestled in the protective embrace of the Prince of Wales group of Islands in the Torres Strait and is a hilly Island of almost 5 kilometres, it's multi-cultural population numbers around 4000. Thursday Island holds some great Australian History from playing an important role in WW II, acting as the defence centre for Australia and the near-by Horn Island being a strategic air-base to the traditional inhabitants of this group of Islands that stretch from Cape York to the PNG coastline. These Torres Strait Islanders (being the correct name for this culturally unique group) lived, fished, traded and where possible on the islands tended vegetable gardens, all for them and their families to survive by. They were masters of the sea and it's many products. The first ever contact between the Islanders and Europeans wasn't until 1606 when the Spanish navigator, "Torres" sailed through the Strait which was subsequently then named after him. Today Thursday Island owes its present day identity to the rough and tumble of the early pearling industry (now declining), (although some pearls are still produced from seeded culture farms) which turned this quiet administrative centre into a cosmopolitan township. An interesting blend of Torres Strait culture, European modernisation and a strong indo-pacific influence has now shaped this remote pearl into a fascinating destination. The main industry now is Fishing, Cray-fishing, Prawning and Trochus. Thursday Island is an Island that sets it's own pace, allowing you to relax without the constant demands of 'City Living'. Here you can enjoy some of the comforts of home but on a much smaller scale and with some real culture thrown in. There is an Art Gallery, Museums,Markets, Restaurants where you can sample the local delicacies including the famous 'Painted Cray', Cafes, Bakeries, Shopping Facilities, Hotels, Motels, Seafood Factories, Tackle stores for the anglers and much, much more.

Day 14 Cruising
Day 15Port of Call Darwin Arrival 9:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Darwin - Capital City of the Northern Territory Where Asia meets the Dreamtime An exciting, eclectic mixture of cultures A place that is truly uniquely Australian while being home for more than 60 different nationalities, people who come from all continents of the globe. A focus for festivals, food and fashion. A sporting centre, home to the Darwin Cup, the Arafura Games and more and more exciting national and international sporting events Darwin City - Set on a rocky peninsula reaching into one of the most beautiful natural harbours on the north Australian coast. Elevated above the cliffs, surrounded by water on three sides, a city fanned by soft cool breezes that contribute to its tropical charm. The tropical climate encourages outdoor living and locals and visitors alike take advantage of this lifestyle to stroll through Darwin's leafy streets, browsing through the art galleries and enjoying cafe life, discovering little hidden corners of the city. The contrasts are exquisite. A Chinese temple with its statues of the Immortals, the smoke from incense drifting slowly upward, lies only twenty metres behind busy Cavenagh St, but exists in a different world, timeless and peaceful. Darwin - a city of contrasts and tempting tastes. where shady parks suitable for quiet contemplation lie only metres from streets full of shoppers, the smells of food drift on the air from sizzling grills, flaming woks and bubbling saucepans. Darwin - take time to enjoy its wonderful trees that surprise our visitors, exotic flowering trees, frangipani, Pride of India and poincianas, the shady raintrees, banyan and tamarind trees delight the senses and leave images of a truly tropical city. Darwin - A city destroyed three times - first by the cyclone of 1893, then by the bombs of World War II, next by Cyclone Tracy. The spirit of survival undiminished, Darwin has grown and developed to become the modern city of today, a monument to the tenacity and courage of its people.

Day 16 Cruising
Day 17Port of Call Komodo Arrival 10:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Komodo island, part of the Lesser Sunda chain of Indonesian islands, is the rugged habitat of the 3m-long Komodo dragon monitor lizard. Komodo National Park covers the entire region and is home to more than 4,000 dragons, and is made up of rusty-red volcanic hills, savannah and forests. Its surrounding waters of seagrass beds, mangrove shrublands and coral reefs are famous for diving.

Day 18Port of Call Benoa Arrival 12:00pm

Overview

Benoa is the most important port and commercial port of Bali for some 10 km away, the Denpasar. After the conquest of the island by the Dutch was the port (Labuhan Benoa) artificially created. Swimming is a wonderful fishing village of the neighboring Tanjung Benoa, on which you can translate.

Day 19Port of Call BenoaDeparture 9:00pm

Overview

Benoa is the most important port and commercial port of Bali for some 10 km away, the Denpasar. After the conquest of the island by the Dutch was the port (Labuhan Benoa) artificially created. Swimming is a wonderful fishing village of the neighboring Tanjung Benoa, on which you can translate.

Day 20Port of Call Celukan Bawang Arrival 7:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Celukan Bawang is located in northern Bali on a protected bay, approximately 40 km from the city of Singaraja. Lovina Beach is only 30 minutes from Celukan Bawang. It offers the opportunity to relax on the black sand beaches away from the crowds of southern Bali. Nearby are restaurants and boutiques. Further afield is the city of Singaraja, the second largest city of Bali. This city has the feel of an old colonial capital, with traces of both muslim and Chinese influences.

Day 21Port of Call Surabaya Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Surabaya is a port city on the Indonesian island of Java. A vibrant, sprawling metropolis, it mixes modern skyscrapers with canals and buildings from its Dutch colonial past. It has a thriving Chinatown and an Arab Quarter whose Ampel Mosque dates to the 15th century. The Tugu Pahlawan (Heroes Monument) honors the independence battles waged in Surabaya’s streets in 1945.

Day 22Port of Call Semarang Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Semarang is a port city on the north coast of Java, Indonesia. Its old quarter features Dutch colonial architecture including the landmark Lawang Sewu, a massive building that was the railway company's headquarters. Sam Poo Kong, a 15th-century temple, is a prominent site in Chinatown. The modern city centers around Simpang Lima, a tree-lined green space in the commercial district.

Day 23 Cruising
Day 24Port of Call Singapore Arrival 11:00am

Overview

Though physically small, Singapore is an economic giant. It has been Southeast Asia's most modern city for over a century. The city blends Malay, Chinese, Arab, Indian and English cultures and religions. Its unique ethnic tapestry affords visitors a wide array of sightseeing and culinary opportunities from which to choose. A full calendar of traditional festivals and holidays celebrated throughout the year adds to its cultural appeal. In addition, Singapore offers luxury hotels, delectable cuisine and great shopping! Located at the tip of the Malay Peninsula, Singapore's tropical climate welcomes both leisure and business travelers year round. The island republic's excellent infrastructure enables visitors to enjoy its many sites and attractions in a safe, clean and green environment. Award winning Changi Airport provides airlinks to major cities around the world. The train and subway systems are clean, fast and efficient. In addition, its state-of-the-art cruise terminal has established Singapore as one of the premier cruising centers of South East Asia and an exciting port of call on any Asian cruise itinerary. In the city, there is no need for a car. Public transportation is excellent and walking is a good way to explore the city . All major attractions are also accessible by tour bus. Since the city is only 60 miles (100k) from the equator, the tropical temperatures do not vary much. Rainfall is fairly evenly distributed through the year. No matter when you choose to visit, warm weather will be abundantly available. The visitor is struck immediately by Singapore's abundance of parks, nature reserves, and lush, tropical greenery. Singapore's progress over the past three decades has been remarkable, yet the island has not been overwhelmed by development. Visitors will discover a wealth of historical treasures from the past, in the beauty of older buildings, values and traditions that have survived in the face of profound social and geographical change. Lacking any noteworthy natural resources, Singapore's early prosperity was based on a vigorous free trade policy, put in place in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles first established it as a British trading post. Later, mass industrialization bolstered the economy, and today the state boasts the world's second busiest port after Rotterdam, minimal unemployment, and a super efficient infrastructure. Almost the entire population lives in upscale new apartments, and the average per capita income is over US$12,000. Singapore is a clean, safe place to visit, its amenities are second to none and its public places are smoke-free and hygienic. Forming the core of downtown Singapore is the Colonial District. Each surrounding enclave has its own distinct flavor, from the aromatic spice stores of Little India, to the tumbledown backstreets of Chinatown, where it is still possible to find calligraphers and fortune tellers, or the Arab Quarter, whose cluttered stores sell fine cloths and silks. North of the city, are two nature preserves, Bukit Timah and the Central Catchment Area, along with the splendid Singapore Zoological Gardens. The east coast features good seafood restaurants set on long stretches of sandy beach. In addition there are over fifty islands and islets within Singaporean waters, all of which can be reached with varying degrees of ease. Day trips are popular to Sentosa, the island amusement arcade which is linked to the south coast by a short causeway and cable car. Music, theater, nightlife: all are abundant in this remarkable city. Singapore used to be considered a "stop over" on the way to larger Asian cities. This is no longer true! Visitors seek out Singapore for business and finance and also for a fascinating and satisfying vacation for the whole family. Strategically located at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula sixty miles from the equator, Singapore has for centuries been a crossroads between East and West. Chinese traders en route to India had navigated its waters from at least the 5th century. In the 14th century it was part of the powerful Vijayan Empire and was known as Tenmasek or Sea Town. Legend has it that it was renamed Singa Pura or Lion City after a visiting Sumatran prince saw an animal he mistook for a lion, an animal considered a good omen. Modern Singapore came into being in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles claimed what was then a small fishing village as a regional base for the East India Company. The island's natural harbor and location made it an ideal site for a trading post serving British trade interests between China, the Malay world and India. Singapore flourished as its free trade policy attracted merchants and residents from all over the world. Raffles initiated a town plan which included leveling one hill to form a new commercial district (now Raffles Place) and constructing government buildings around another hill (now called Fort Canning Hill). The British plan also involved separating the population according to ethnic categories with Europeans, Indians, Chinese and Malays each living and working in their own distinct quarters of the city. Revenues soared in ensuing years from the production of opium and rubber. Millionaires were made overnight. Immigration rose steadily. The island became Britain's strategic defense base in the Far East but fell to the Japanese in 1942. After the world war ended in 1945, Singapore became a crown colony. It gained self governing status in 1959 and independence in 1965 when it became part of the new state of Malaysia which united Malaya with Singapore, Sabah, and Sarawak. The alliance did not last. Singapore was used to being on its own, and within two years the island set up its own stable government and became known as the Republic of Singapore. Under Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew's leadership, Singapore continued to strengthen its infrastructure and its industrial base. Housing and urban renovation kept pace with population growth. The areas of health and education are strong. Singapore's leaders have also brought order and progress through strict regulation of social behavior. Smoking in public was banned, as was gum chewing. High economic growth rates have supported political stability. Singapore is the world's second busiest seaport, has an airport served by over 50 major airlines. It has state of the art communication and mass transit systems. It is Asia's premier center for finance and business and the world's third largest oil refining center. Over 7 million visit the tiny island every year.

Day 25Port of Call SingaporeDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Though physically small, Singapore is an economic giant. It has been Southeast Asia's most modern city for over a century. The city blends Malay, Chinese, Arab, Indian and English cultures and religions. Its unique ethnic tapestry affords visitors a wide array of sightseeing and culinary opportunities from which to choose. A full calendar of traditional festivals and holidays celebrated throughout the year adds to its cultural appeal. In addition, Singapore offers luxury hotels, delectable cuisine and great shopping! Located at the tip of the Malay Peninsula, Singapore's tropical climate welcomes both leisure and business travelers year round. The island republic's excellent infrastructure enables visitors to enjoy its many sites and attractions in a safe, clean and green environment. Award winning Changi Airport provides airlinks to major cities around the world. The train and subway systems are clean, fast and efficient. In addition, its state-of-the-art cruise terminal has established Singapore as one of the premier cruising centers of South East Asia and an exciting port of call on any Asian cruise itinerary. In the city, there is no need for a car. Public transportation is excellent and walking is a good way to explore the city . All major attractions are also accessible by tour bus. Since the city is only 60 miles (100k) from the equator, the tropical temperatures do not vary much. Rainfall is fairly evenly distributed through the year. No matter when you choose to visit, warm weather will be abundantly available. The visitor is struck immediately by Singapore's abundance of parks, nature reserves, and lush, tropical greenery. Singapore's progress over the past three decades has been remarkable, yet the island has not been overwhelmed by development. Visitors will discover a wealth of historical treasures from the past, in the beauty of older buildings, values and traditions that have survived in the face of profound social and geographical change. Lacking any noteworthy natural resources, Singapore's early prosperity was based on a vigorous free trade policy, put in place in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles first established it as a British trading post. Later, mass industrialization bolstered the economy, and today the state boasts the world's second busiest port after Rotterdam, minimal unemployment, and a super efficient infrastructure. Almost the entire population lives in upscale new apartments, and the average per capita income is over US$12,000. Singapore is a clean, safe place to visit, its amenities are second to none and its public places are smoke-free and hygienic. Forming the core of downtown Singapore is the Colonial District. Each surrounding enclave has its own distinct flavor, from the aromatic spice stores of Little India, to the tumbledown backstreets of Chinatown, where it is still possible to find calligraphers and fortune tellers, or the Arab Quarter, whose cluttered stores sell fine cloths and silks. North of the city, are two nature preserves, Bukit Timah and the Central Catchment Area, along with the splendid Singapore Zoological Gardens. The east coast features good seafood restaurants set on long stretches of sandy beach. In addition there are over fifty islands and islets within Singaporean waters, all of which can be reached with varying degrees of ease. Day trips are popular to Sentosa, the island amusement arcade which is linked to the south coast by a short causeway and cable car. Music, theater, nightlife: all are abundant in this remarkable city. Singapore used to be considered a "stop over" on the way to larger Asian cities. This is no longer true! Visitors seek out Singapore for business and finance and also for a fascinating and satisfying vacation for the whole family. Strategically located at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula sixty miles from the equator, Singapore has for centuries been a crossroads between East and West. Chinese traders en route to India had navigated its waters from at least the 5th century. In the 14th century it was part of the powerful Vijayan Empire and was known as Tenmasek or Sea Town. Legend has it that it was renamed Singa Pura or Lion City after a visiting Sumatran prince saw an animal he mistook for a lion, an animal considered a good omen. Modern Singapore came into being in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles claimed what was then a small fishing village as a regional base for the East India Company. The island's natural harbor and location made it an ideal site for a trading post serving British trade interests between China, the Malay world and India. Singapore flourished as its free trade policy attracted merchants and residents from all over the world. Raffles initiated a town plan which included leveling one hill to form a new commercial district (now Raffles Place) and constructing government buildings around another hill (now called Fort Canning Hill). The British plan also involved separating the population according to ethnic categories with Europeans, Indians, Chinese and Malays each living and working in their own distinct quarters of the city. Revenues soared in ensuing years from the production of opium and rubber. Millionaires were made overnight. Immigration rose steadily. The island became Britain's strategic defense base in the Far East but fell to the Japanese in 1942. After the world war ended in 1945, Singapore became a crown colony. It gained self governing status in 1959 and independence in 1965 when it became part of the new state of Malaysia which united Malaya with Singapore, Sabah, and Sarawak. The alliance did not last. Singapore was used to being on its own, and within two years the island set up its own stable government and became known as the Republic of Singapore. Under Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew's leadership, Singapore continued to strengthen its infrastructure and its industrial base. Housing and urban renovation kept pace with population growth. The areas of health and education are strong. Singapore's leaders have also brought order and progress through strict regulation of social behavior. Smoking in public was banned, as was gum chewing. High economic growth rates have supported political stability. Singapore is the world's second busiest seaport, has an airport served by over 50 major airlines. It has state of the art communication and mass transit systems. It is Asia's premier center for finance and business and the world's third largest oil refining center. Over 7 million visit the tiny island every year.

Day 26 Cruising
Day 27Port of Call Ho Chi Minh City Arrival 9:00am

Overview

In the core of the Mekong Delta, Ho Chi Minh City, formerly known as Saigon, is second the most important in Vietnam after Hanoi. It is not only a commercial center but also a scientific, technological, industrial and tourist center. The city is bathed by many rivers, arroyos and canals, the biggest river being the Saigon River. Many centuries ago, Saigon was already a busy commercial center. Merchants from China, Japan and many European countries would sail upstream the Saigon River to reach the islet of Pho, a trading center. In the year of 1874, Cho Lon merged with Saigon, forming the largest city in the Indochina. It had been many times celebrated as the Pearl of the Far East. After the reunification of the country, the 6 th National Assembly in its meeting of the 2 nd of July, 1976, has officially rebaptized Saigon, Ho Chi Minh City. Today, Ho Chi Minh City is the big tourism center in Vietnam, attracting a large of visitors to Vietnam. Ho Chi Minh City has various attractions as Ho Chi Minh Museum, formerly known as Dragon House Wharf, Cu Chi Tunnels, system of museums, theatres, cultural houses... Recently, many tourist areas are invested such as Thanh Da, Binh Quoi Village, Dam Sen Park, Saigon Water Park, Suoi Tien, Ky Hoa..., which draw numerous tourists.

Day 28Port of Call Ho Chi Minh CityDeparture 4:00pm

Overview

In the core of the Mekong Delta, Ho Chi Minh City, formerly known as Saigon, is second the most important in Vietnam after Hanoi. It is not only a commercial center but also a scientific, technological, industrial and tourist center. The city is bathed by many rivers, arroyos and canals, the biggest river being the Saigon River. Many centuries ago, Saigon was already a busy commercial center. Merchants from China, Japan and many European countries would sail upstream the Saigon River to reach the islet of Pho, a trading center. In the year of 1874, Cho Lon merged with Saigon, forming the largest city in the Indochina. It had been many times celebrated as the Pearl of the Far East. After the reunification of the country, the 6 th National Assembly in its meeting of the 2 nd of July, 1976, has officially rebaptized Saigon, Ho Chi Minh City. Today, Ho Chi Minh City is the big tourism center in Vietnam, attracting a large of visitors to Vietnam. Ho Chi Minh City has various attractions as Ho Chi Minh Museum, formerly known as Dragon House Wharf, Cu Chi Tunnels, system of museums, theatres, cultural houses... Recently, many tourist areas are invested such as Thanh Da, Binh Quoi Village, Dam Sen Park, Saigon Water Park, Suoi Tien, Ky Hoa..., which draw numerous tourists.

Day 29Port of Call Nha Trang Arrival 10:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Nha Trang is a coastal resort city in southern Vietnam known for its beaches, diving sites and offshore islands. Its main beach is a long, curving stretch along Tran Phu Street backed by a promenade, hotels and seafood restaurants. Aerial cable cars cross over to Hòn Tre Island, and the nature reserves of Hòn Mun and Hòn T?m islands, reachable by boat, have coral reefs.

Day 30 Cruising
Day 31Port of Call Sihanoukville Arrival 6:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Sihanoukville is a coastal city in Cambodia and the capital city of Sihanoukville Province, at the tip of an elevated peninsula in the country's south-west on the Gulf of Thailand. The city is flanked by an almost uninterrupted string of beaches along its entire coastline and coastal marshlands bordering the Ream National Park in the east.

Day 32Port of Call Laem Chabang Arrival 11:00am

Overview

Laem Chabang is a port city in Chonburi Province, Thailand. It includes tambon Bang Lamung of Bang Lamung District, the tambons Bueng, Surasak, Thung Sukhla, and parts of Nong Kham of Si Racha District. As of 2006 it had a population of 61,801.

Day 33Port of Call Laem ChabangDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Laem Chabang is a port city in Chonburi Province, Thailand. It includes tambon Bang Lamung of Bang Lamung District, the tambons Bueng, Surasak, Thung Sukhla, and parts of Nong Kham of Si Racha District. As of 2006 it had a population of 61,801.

Day 34Port of Call Amphoe Ko Samui Arrival 10:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

The island was probably first inhabited about 15 centuries ago, settled by fishermen from the Malay Peninsula[2] and southern China. It appears on Chinese maps dating back to 1687, under the name Pulo Cornam. The name samui is mysterious in itself. Perhaps it is an extension of the name of one of the native trees, mui. Some people believe that the word "samui" derives from the Malay word "saboey", or "safe haven", although there appears to be no credible corroboration of this. Ko is the Thai word for "island".

Day 35 Cruising
Day 36Port of Call Singapore Arrival 10:00am

Overview

Though physically small, Singapore is an economic giant. It has been Southeast Asia's most modern city for over a century. The city blends Malay, Chinese, Arab, Indian and English cultures and religions. Its unique ethnic tapestry affords visitors a wide array of sightseeing and culinary opportunities from which to choose. A full calendar of traditional festivals and holidays celebrated throughout the year adds to its cultural appeal. In addition, Singapore offers luxury hotels, delectable cuisine and great shopping! Located at the tip of the Malay Peninsula, Singapore's tropical climate welcomes both leisure and business travelers year round. The island republic's excellent infrastructure enables visitors to enjoy its many sites and attractions in a safe, clean and green environment. Award winning Changi Airport provides airlinks to major cities around the world. The train and subway systems are clean, fast and efficient. In addition, its state-of-the-art cruise terminal has established Singapore as one of the premier cruising centers of South East Asia and an exciting port of call on any Asian cruise itinerary. In the city, there is no need for a car. Public transportation is excellent and walking is a good way to explore the city . All major attractions are also accessible by tour bus. Since the city is only 60 miles (100k) from the equator, the tropical temperatures do not vary much. Rainfall is fairly evenly distributed through the year. No matter when you choose to visit, warm weather will be abundantly available. The visitor is struck immediately by Singapore's abundance of parks, nature reserves, and lush, tropical greenery. Singapore's progress over the past three decades has been remarkable, yet the island has not been overwhelmed by development. Visitors will discover a wealth of historical treasures from the past, in the beauty of older buildings, values and traditions that have survived in the face of profound social and geographical change. Lacking any noteworthy natural resources, Singapore's early prosperity was based on a vigorous free trade policy, put in place in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles first established it as a British trading post. Later, mass industrialization bolstered the economy, and today the state boasts the world's second busiest port after Rotterdam, minimal unemployment, and a super efficient infrastructure. Almost the entire population lives in upscale new apartments, and the average per capita income is over US$12,000. Singapore is a clean, safe place to visit, its amenities are second to none and its public places are smoke-free and hygienic. Forming the core of downtown Singapore is the Colonial District. Each surrounding enclave has its own distinct flavor, from the aromatic spice stores of Little India, to the tumbledown backstreets of Chinatown, where it is still possible to find calligraphers and fortune tellers, or the Arab Quarter, whose cluttered stores sell fine cloths and silks. North of the city, are two nature preserves, Bukit Timah and the Central Catchment Area, along with the splendid Singapore Zoological Gardens. The east coast features good seafood restaurants set on long stretches of sandy beach. In addition there are over fifty islands and islets within Singaporean waters, all of which can be reached with varying degrees of ease. Day trips are popular to Sentosa, the island amusement arcade which is linked to the south coast by a short causeway and cable car. Music, theater, nightlife: all are abundant in this remarkable city. Singapore used to be considered a "stop over" on the way to larger Asian cities. This is no longer true! Visitors seek out Singapore for business and finance and also for a fascinating and satisfying vacation for the whole family. Strategically located at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula sixty miles from the equator, Singapore has for centuries been a crossroads between East and West. Chinese traders en route to India had navigated its waters from at least the 5th century. In the 14th century it was part of the powerful Vijayan Empire and was known as Tenmasek or Sea Town. Legend has it that it was renamed Singa Pura or Lion City after a visiting Sumatran prince saw an animal he mistook for a lion, an animal considered a good omen. Modern Singapore came into being in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles claimed what was then a small fishing village as a regional base for the East India Company. The island's natural harbor and location made it an ideal site for a trading post serving British trade interests between China, the Malay world and India. Singapore flourished as its free trade policy attracted merchants and residents from all over the world. Raffles initiated a town plan which included leveling one hill to form a new commercial district (now Raffles Place) and constructing government buildings around another hill (now called Fort Canning Hill). The British plan also involved separating the population according to ethnic categories with Europeans, Indians, Chinese and Malays each living and working in their own distinct quarters of the city. Revenues soared in ensuing years from the production of opium and rubber. Millionaires were made overnight. Immigration rose steadily. The island became Britain's strategic defense base in the Far East but fell to the Japanese in 1942. After the world war ended in 1945, Singapore became a crown colony. It gained self governing status in 1959 and independence in 1965 when it became part of the new state of Malaysia which united Malaya with Singapore, Sabah, and Sarawak. The alliance did not last. Singapore was used to being on its own, and within two years the island set up its own stable government and became known as the Republic of Singapore. Under Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew's leadership, Singapore continued to strengthen its infrastructure and its industrial base. Housing and urban renovation kept pace with population growth. The areas of health and education are strong. Singapore's leaders have also brought order and progress through strict regulation of social behavior. Smoking in public was banned, as was gum chewing. High economic growth rates have supported political stability. Singapore is the world's second busiest seaport, has an airport served by over 50 major airlines. It has state of the art communication and mass transit systems. It is Asia's premier center for finance and business and the world's third largest oil refining center. Over 7 million visit the tiny island every year.

Day 37Port of Call SingaporeDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Though physically small, Singapore is an economic giant. It has been Southeast Asia's most modern city for over a century. The city blends Malay, Chinese, Arab, Indian and English cultures and religions. Its unique ethnic tapestry affords visitors a wide array of sightseeing and culinary opportunities from which to choose. A full calendar of traditional festivals and holidays celebrated throughout the year adds to its cultural appeal. In addition, Singapore offers luxury hotels, delectable cuisine and great shopping! Located at the tip of the Malay Peninsula, Singapore's tropical climate welcomes both leisure and business travelers year round. The island republic's excellent infrastructure enables visitors to enjoy its many sites and attractions in a safe, clean and green environment. Award winning Changi Airport provides airlinks to major cities around the world. The train and subway systems are clean, fast and efficient. In addition, its state-of-the-art cruise terminal has established Singapore as one of the premier cruising centers of South East Asia and an exciting port of call on any Asian cruise itinerary. In the city, there is no need for a car. Public transportation is excellent and walking is a good way to explore the city . All major attractions are also accessible by tour bus. Since the city is only 60 miles (100k) from the equator, the tropical temperatures do not vary much. Rainfall is fairly evenly distributed through the year. No matter when you choose to visit, warm weather will be abundantly available. The visitor is struck immediately by Singapore's abundance of parks, nature reserves, and lush, tropical greenery. Singapore's progress over the past three decades has been remarkable, yet the island has not been overwhelmed by development. Visitors will discover a wealth of historical treasures from the past, in the beauty of older buildings, values and traditions that have survived in the face of profound social and geographical change. Lacking any noteworthy natural resources, Singapore's early prosperity was based on a vigorous free trade policy, put in place in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles first established it as a British trading post. Later, mass industrialization bolstered the economy, and today the state boasts the world's second busiest port after Rotterdam, minimal unemployment, and a super efficient infrastructure. Almost the entire population lives in upscale new apartments, and the average per capita income is over US$12,000. Singapore is a clean, safe place to visit, its amenities are second to none and its public places are smoke-free and hygienic. Forming the core of downtown Singapore is the Colonial District. Each surrounding enclave has its own distinct flavor, from the aromatic spice stores of Little India, to the tumbledown backstreets of Chinatown, where it is still possible to find calligraphers and fortune tellers, or the Arab Quarter, whose cluttered stores sell fine cloths and silks. North of the city, are two nature preserves, Bukit Timah and the Central Catchment Area, along with the splendid Singapore Zoological Gardens. The east coast features good seafood restaurants set on long stretches of sandy beach. In addition there are over fifty islands and islets within Singaporean waters, all of which can be reached with varying degrees of ease. Day trips are popular to Sentosa, the island amusement arcade which is linked to the south coast by a short causeway and cable car. Music, theater, nightlife: all are abundant in this remarkable city. Singapore used to be considered a "stop over" on the way to larger Asian cities. This is no longer true! Visitors seek out Singapore for business and finance and also for a fascinating and satisfying vacation for the whole family. Strategically located at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula sixty miles from the equator, Singapore has for centuries been a crossroads between East and West. Chinese traders en route to India had navigated its waters from at least the 5th century. In the 14th century it was part of the powerful Vijayan Empire and was known as Tenmasek or Sea Town. Legend has it that it was renamed Singa Pura or Lion City after a visiting Sumatran prince saw an animal he mistook for a lion, an animal considered a good omen. Modern Singapore came into being in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles claimed what was then a small fishing village as a regional base for the East India Company. The island's natural harbor and location made it an ideal site for a trading post serving British trade interests between China, the Malay world and India. Singapore flourished as its free trade policy attracted merchants and residents from all over the world. Raffles initiated a town plan which included leveling one hill to form a new commercial district (now Raffles Place) and constructing government buildings around another hill (now called Fort Canning Hill). The British plan also involved separating the population according to ethnic categories with Europeans, Indians, Chinese and Malays each living and working in their own distinct quarters of the city. Revenues soared in ensuing years from the production of opium and rubber. Millionaires were made overnight. Immigration rose steadily. The island became Britain's strategic defense base in the Far East but fell to the Japanese in 1942. After the world war ended in 1945, Singapore became a crown colony. It gained self governing status in 1959 and independence in 1965 when it became part of the new state of Malaysia which united Malaya with Singapore, Sabah, and Sarawak. The alliance did not last. Singapore was used to being on its own, and within two years the island set up its own stable government and became known as the Republic of Singapore. Under Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew's leadership, Singapore continued to strengthen its infrastructure and its industrial base. Housing and urban renovation kept pace with population growth. The areas of health and education are strong. Singapore's leaders have also brought order and progress through strict regulation of social behavior. Smoking in public was banned, as was gum chewing. High economic growth rates have supported political stability. Singapore is the world's second busiest seaport, has an airport served by over 50 major airlines. It has state of the art communication and mass transit systems. It is Asia's premier center for finance and business and the world's third largest oil refining center. Over 7 million visit the tiny island every year.

Day 38Port of Call Kuala Lumpur Arrival 10:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Kuala Lumpur is the capital of Malaysia. Its modern skyline is dominated by the 451m-tall Petronas Twin Towers, a pair of glass-and-steel-clad skyscrapers with Islamic motifs. The towers also offer a public skybridge and observation deck. The city is also home to British colonial-era landmarks such as the Kuala Lumpur Railway Station and the Sultan Abdul Samad Building.

Day 39Port of Call George Town/Penang Arrival 9:00amDeparture 7:00pm

Overview

Georgetown is a historic neighborhood and a commercial and entertainment district located in northwest Washington, D.C., situated along the Potomac River.

Day 40Port of Call Phuket Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Phuket, a rainforested, mountainous island in the Andaman Sea, has some of Thailand’s most popular beaches, mostly situated along the clear waters of the western shore. The island is home to many high-end seaside resorts, spas and restaurants. Phuket City, the capital, has old shophouses and busy markets. Patong, the main resort town, has many nightclubs, bars and discos.

Day 41Port of Call Sabang Arrival 8:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Sabang is a city consisting of a main island and several smaller islands off the northern tip of Sumatra. The islands form a city within Aceh Special Region, Indonesia. The administrative centre is located on Weh Island, 17 km north of Banda Aceh.

Day 42 Cruising
Day 43 Cruising
Day 44Port of Call Colombo Arrival 7:00amDeparture 3:00pm

Overview

Colombo, the capital of Sri Lanka, has a long history as a port on ancient east-west trade routes, ruled successively by the Portuguese, Dutch and British. That heritage is reflected in its its architecture, mixing colonial buildings with high-rises and shopping malls. The imposing Colombo National Museum, dedicated to Sri Lankan history, borders sprawling Viharamahadevi Park and its giant Buddha.

Day 45Port of Call Cochin Arrival 11:00amDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

Kochi (also known as Cochin) is a city in southwest India's coastal Kerala state. It has been a port since 1341, when a flood carved out its harbor and opened it to Arab, Chinese and European merchants. Sites reflecting those influences include Fort Kochi, a settlement with tiled colonial bungalows and diverse houses of worship. Cantilevered Chinese fishing nets, typical of Kochi, have been in use for centuries.

Day 46Port of Call New Mangalore Arrival 9:30amDeparture 7:30pm

Overview

New Mangalore Port is a deep-water, all-weather port at Panambur, Mangalore in Karnataka state in India, which is the deepest inner harbour on the west coast. It is the only major port of Karnataka and is the seventh largest port in India.

Day 47Port of Call Mormugao Arrival 7:30amDeparture 5:30pm

Overview

Mormugao is a sub-district and a municipal council in South Goa district in the Indian state of Goa. It is Goa’s main port. It was featured in the 1980 film The Sea Wolves and the Bollywood film Bhootnath.

Day 48Port of Call Mumbai Arrival 9:00amDeparture 8:00pm

Overview

Welcome to the city of merry making Mumbai formerly known as Bombay. The capital of Maharashtra lies on the wonderful west coast of India. The city was named after the local deity, Mumba Devi. The temple dedicated to the goddess still exists. Mumbai was till recent days known as Bombay owing to the Portuguese rulers believed the name of the city to be “Bom Baim” or the Good Bay. The city boasts of a natural harbor that was developed under the imperial rule. Mumbai is home to people of diverse castes, creeds, colors and cultures is an amalgamation of seven islands namely, Colaba, Mahim, Mazgaon, Parel, Worli, Girgaun and Dongri. The group of seven islands was amalgamated way back in the year 1862. Further the reclamation of land from the sea has brought areas like the Churchgate and Nariman Point into existence. Mumbai has been the Wall Street for all the businessmen in India. The film capital with its hip and hop has been the Hollywood to all the Indian stargazers. The port city of Mumbai handles a major chunk of the maritime trade in India. Right from the Victoria Terminus to the Juhu beach the city is full of treasures. People from various places come to the city of dreams. The inborn desire to become an actor or simply be successful in life draws people to the magnetic Mumbai. The biggest of industries and the largest of slums are all found Mumbai. Visit Mumbai making waves with its business tycoons and cool trends in the fashion industry. The city is not only home to the world’s largest film industry but also has architectural landmarks both Victorian as well as Indian heritage. Om your holiday at Mumbai you must unravel the treasures of the beaches, hills and the caves. The bustling bazaars Kalbadevi and Bhuleshwar, north of Crawford market are highlighted with the Mangaldas Market, Zaveri Bazaar, and Chor Bazaar. The life and styles of the people are extremes. The Bhelpuri on the Chowpatty is enjoyed as much as the pizza at any of the fast food restaurants. The balloon sellers, pigeon feeds, buggy rides and snacks take up the evenings at Mumbai. You name it and Mumbai has it for you From Parsi dhansaak to Gujarati thalis, and Muslim kebabs to Goan vindaloos, Mumbai caters to individual needs of all kinds. Ask for Indian, Chinese, Italian or Mexican the chefs at Mumbai will delight you with all. From the roadside stalls to the 5 star hotels, the food and facilities can be opted for as per the requirements and the budget of the traveler. On the regular days sip the any of the many pubs and shake a leg at the various discotheques.Mumbai celebrates the year through with the ear-splitting processions and immersion of the idol of the elephant headed God at Ganesh Chaturthi to the dandiya during the navratri days. Let the breeze from the Arabian Sea sweep you.

Day 49 Cruising
Day 50 Cruising
Day 51Port of Call Al Fujayrah Arrival 8:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Fujairah is an emirate on the east coast of the United Arab Emirates, lying along the Gulf of Oman. It's known for its beaches and the Hajar Mountains, which run through much of the emirate. In the south, the city of Fujairah is home to the massive Sheikh Zayed Mosque, with its towering white minarets. Overlooking the city is Fujairah Fort, a reconstructed 17th-century fortress featuring round and square towers.

Day 52Port of Call Dubai Arrival 10:00am

Overview

Dubai is located on the Eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula, in the south west corner of the Arabian Gulf. It is extremely well known for its warm hospitality and rich cultural heritage, and the Emirati people are welcoming and generous in their approach to visitors. With year-round sunshine, intriguing deserts, beautiful beaches, luxurious hotels and shopping malls, fascinating heritage attractions and a thriving business community, Dubai receives millions of leisure and business visitors each year from around the world. The local currency is the dirham, which is pegged at AED 3.67 to 1 US dollar. Dubai is tolerant and cosmopolitan and all visitors are welcome. However, Islam is a way of life in the city, and therefore tourists should adopt a certain level of cultural and religious sensitivity for the duration of their stay.

Day 53Port of Call DubaiDeparture 9:00pm

Overview

Dubai is located on the Eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula, in the south west corner of the Arabian Gulf. It is extremely well known for its warm hospitality and rich cultural heritage, and the Emirati people are welcoming and generous in their approach to visitors. With year-round sunshine, intriguing deserts, beautiful beaches, luxurious hotels and shopping malls, fascinating heritage attractions and a thriving business community, Dubai receives millions of leisure and business visitors each year from around the world. The local currency is the dirham, which is pegged at AED 3.67 to 1 US dollar. Dubai is tolerant and cosmopolitan and all visitors are welcome. However, Islam is a way of life in the city, and therefore tourists should adopt a certain level of cultural and religious sensitivity for the duration of their stay.

Day 54Port of Call Khasab Arrival 7:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

Khasab is a port city on northern Oman’s Musandam Peninsula. Khasab Fort has crenellated stone turrets, model wooden boats and a museum with handicrafts and archaeological finds. From Khasab Harbor, wooden boats cruise the Strait of Hormuz, offering rugged coastal views and dolphin sightings. South, past mountain villages and green valleys, Jabal Hareem peak is known for its marine fossils.

Day 55Port of Call Muscat Arrival 9:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Oman's capital enchants visitors in a way that no other city in the Gulf can even begin to match. Maybe it's because Muscat doesn't have that slightly artificial feel which typifies so much of the rest of the region. Muscat, Mutrah and Ruwi are the capital's core districts. Muscat, the old port area, is the site of the sultan's main palace and a fascinating place to wander around, but it has few shops and, except for the old city walls, it isn't exactly bursting with sights. Mutrah, 3km (2mi) north-west of Muscat, is the main trading and residential port area. A few kilometres inland from Muscat and Mutrah lies Ruwi, the capital's modern commercial district. There are three forts in Muscat, all of which took on their more or less present form in the 1580s during the Portuguese occupation of Muscat. Mutrah Fort sits on a hill while Jalali and Mirani forts guard the entrance to Muscat. All of the forts are still used by the police and/or military and are closed to the public, but it's okay to photograph them. Muscat has by far the best aquarium in the Gulf. All of the specimens on display are native to Omani waters and most are accompanied by thorough descriptions in English. The Oman Museum, in the Medinat Qaboos, west of Muscat, covers the entire sweep of Oman's 5000-year history. There are also a displays on shipbuilding, Islam and fort architecture. In Ruwi, the National Museum has sparkling displays on Omani silverwork, and the Sultan's Armed Forces Museum, in the Bait al-Falaj fort, has an excellent outline of Omani history. You could easily spend a day in Mutrah. Start off early at the fish market, then head down to the souk for a cup of tea and a wander around the most interesting bazaar in Arabia. To the east, a restored watchtower looks out over Mutrah. The climb is steep and involves more than 100 steps, but the view from the top is worth it. Muscat's best value rooms are along the Mutrah Corniche. If you spend only a little above rock-bottom you'll get good views and great atmosphere. There are several small restaurants along the Corniche, too, and several good bets in Ruwi .

Day 56 Cruising
Day 57Port of Call Salalah Arrival 9:00amDeparture 6:00pm

Overview

Salalah is the capital and largest city of the southern Omani governorate of Dhofar. Its population in 2009 was about 197,169. Salalah is the second-largest city in the Sultanate of Oman, and the largest city in the Dhofar Province. Salalah is the birthplace of the current sultan, Qaboos bin Said. Salalah attracts many people from other parts of Oman and the Persian Gulf region during the monsoon/khareef season, which spans from July to September. The climate of the region and the monsoon allows the city to grow some vegetables and fruits like coconut and bananas. There are many gardens within the city where these vegetables and fruits grow.

Day 58 Cruising
Day 59 Cruising
Day 60 Cruising
Day 61Port of Call Jiddah Arrival 7:00amDeparture 9:00pm

Overview

If you seek the visually spectacular, Jeddah will never disappoint you. And there is probably nowhere more spectacular than Jeddah's floodlit Corniche in the evening, where over 400 open-air sculptures provide a feast for the eye. Their diversity is extraordinary, from the solid curves of Henry Moore to the poetic beauty of Mustafa Sunbal's seagulls in flight. Some may cause aesthetic ambivalence -- the cars embedded in a vast concrete block for instance. They are a good talking point, nonetheless, and in Jeddah everyone has his favourite sculpture. Spectacular, too, is the gigantic fountain , situated opposite Al-Salam Palace, just across the water. It is said to be the world's highest fountain, exceeding even Geneva's famous jet d'eau by several metres. When floodlit by night, the fountain is visible for miles around. After the Mahgreb (sunset) prayer, the Corniche springs into life, with Saudi families dining al fresco. Picnicking is a favourite local hobby, and is regarded as an ideal opportunity to get together for a family chat and a substantial supper. Vendors with handcarts roam the beach, selling candy floss, fizzy drinks and spicy chickpeas. Giant funfairs blossome along the northern sections of the Corniche. Built in two sections strictly segregated by gender, these contain all the traditional rides and thrills, as well as a good selection of gastronomic fairground essentials. For those whose dining requirements are more sedate, Jeddah offers a wonderfully diverse series of treats for the tastebuds. Whether your taste is for Middle Eastern, ethnic or international food, your expectations are more than met by the city's many excellent restaurants. The larger hotels offer well-priced, international menus of an extremely high standard. Worldwide cuisine is often 'themed' in hotel restaurants, so you can enjoy American, French, Mexican, Italian, seafood or whatever else takes your fancy on different nights of the week. For those on a tight budget, Middle Eastern take-away restaurants abound, and many Jeddah residents maintain that it is these which serve the most delicious, reasonably-priced experience for your palate. Here you can buy the traditional shawerma -- thinly-sliced lamb or chicken, rolled with pickles, salad and french-fries into a delicious Arabic sandwich. Falafels are another great favourite -- these are deep-fried balls of ground chick peas, flavoured with garlic and herbs, and cost just a few riyals for a large bag full. The ubiquitous fast-food chains also have several branches in Jeddah. In these, as in all other restaurants, there are always two separate sections; one for 'families' and one for 'bachelors'. Those whose party includes only men should eat in the bachelor section (sometimes known as 'singles'), which is usually situated in the front of the restaurant overlooking the street. The family section, however, is discreetly tucked away and usually has screened windows. Jeddah's early traditions as a trading centre continue unabated in today's cosmopolitan city, and it is possible to buy almost anything in its souqs and shopping malls. Stick to the latter if you prefer to shop under cover in air-conditioned comfort, but for the more adventurous, the souqs have a great deal of charm and are still the main source of a good bargain. Haggling is essential to all Middle Eastern shopping, although prices are sometimes fixed in the larger department stores. By contrast, industry still plays only a minor part in Jeddah's economy, although one industry which does seem to be thriving is tourism. Increased mobility, as a result of lower domestic air fares and better connecting highways, means that many Saudi nationals are now able to enjoy the delights of Jeddah as a holiday resort. Attracted by the Red Sea, the excellent restaurants and shops and the cosmopolitan flavour of the city, Saudis are now taking several short holidays a year, and Jeddah is an increasingly popular destination. Hotels report an increased demand for accommodation, and builders are finding that the demand for new residences is on the increase, as many wealthy families from Riyadh and other cities in the Kingdom are building holiday homes in Jeddah. Jeddah's glitter continues undimmed, and no-one who has visited the city will be able to forget its unique atmosphere.

Day 62 Cruising
Day 63Port of Call Safaga Arrival 6:00am

Overview

Safaga is a working port with several tourist villages specializing in diving holidays, a handful of hotels and some excellent fish restaurants. It is free of pollution and its highly saline water and black sand dunes have distinguished curative properties. The unspoiled beaches and stiff breezes make it an ideal venue for windsurfing. Day trips to Tobia Island or Mons Claudianus in the Red Sea Mountains can be arranged with local guides.

Day 64Port of Call SafagaDeparture 9:00pm

Overview

Safaga is a working port with several tourist villages specializing in diving holidays, a handful of hotels and some excellent fish restaurants. It is free of pollution and its highly saline water and black sand dunes have distinguished curative properties. The unspoiled beaches and stiff breezes make it an ideal venue for windsurfing. Day trips to Tobia Island or Mons Claudianus in the Red Sea Mountains can be arranged with local guides.

Day 65Port of Call Al Aqaba Arrival 10:00amDeparture 11:00pm

Overview

Aqaba is a Jordanian port city on the Red Sea's Gulf of Aqaba. Inhabited since 4000 B.C., it's home to the Islamic-era Aqaba Fort and the adjacent Aqaba Archaeological Museum. Its beach resorts are popular for windsurfing and other water sports, and the area is a top destination for scuba divers, with notable dive sites including the Yamanieh coral reef in the Aqaba Marine Park, south of the city.

Day 66 Cruising
Day 67Transit the Suez Canal
Day 68Port of Call Haifa Arrival 6:00amDeparture 9:00pm

Overview

Haifa, Israel's third largest city and northern capital is the heart of it all! Situated in a broad natural bay between the beautiful Mediterranean Sea and the inspiring Carmel Mountain, the city's terraced landscape offers a rich variety of breathtaking panoramas, giving the observer the sensation of being on a heavenly peninsula. To the Northeast, across the sparkling waters of the harbor sits the medieval walled fortress city of Acre. Directly North, if the weather is good, beacon the heights of Rosh Hanikra, the white cliff, checkpoint on the Israel-Lebanon border. Further East towers the snow capped peak of Mount Hermon. Haifa is home to 250,000 inhabitants, members of five different religions, living side by side in harmony, peace and mutual respect. A rich tapestry of contrasts and colors, varying cultures, and ethnic groups makes up the fabric of life in Haifa. Secular, Religious and Ultra-Orthodox Jews live side by side with Christians, Moslems, Bahai and Druze. Wadi Nisnas, with its colorful shouk and bustling streets is an authentic Middle Eastern neighborhood. Nearby, the Orthodox Geula Street, recalls the sights and sounds of an East European community. Close at hand, reside the carefully anicured Persian gardens and the glittering gold dome of the Bahai Shrine, World Center of the Bahai faith.

Day 69 Cruising
Day 70Port of Call Kusadasi Arrival 7:00amDeparture 5:00pm

Overview

This seaside resort town has grown immensely in the last 30 years, and is especially popular with package holiday-makers from Europe. From a population of 6000 in the 1970s, it is now closer to 50,000, although a high proportion of this are part of the tourist industry and here only for the summer. Many cruising ships travelling around the Aegean Islands stop here, especially because of its close proximity (20km) to Selcuk. Kusadasi is a good base to explore this and other ancient cities like Priene and Didyma. Although there is little of historical interest in Kusadasi itself, the town is popular predominantly because of its many hotels, restaurants, souvenir and carpet shops, and lively nightlife. The Kale district has some old traditional houses and narrow streets, and gives some indication of what the town used to be like. The most famous beach is Kadinlar Plaji, 2.5km south of the town, dominated by huge hotels and can get very crowded in summer. There are several small beaches further south, and closer to town is Yilanci Burnu, the peninsular.

Day 71Port of Call Athens/Piraeus Arrival 6:00am

Overview

Today Piraeus is the home base of Greek shipping, the largest commercial fleet in the world, apace bound to the sea like few others. The harbours of Zea and Mikrolimano as well as Phaliro play host to countless yachts and sailing craft throughout the year. Piraeus was known in medieval times as Porto Leone, a name due to the enormous stone lion, which guarded the port's entrance. Today, the life of Piraeus is centred on its three ports: the main, central one and those of Zea and Mikrolimano. You can walk around the central harbour, shared by cargo and passenger ships alike, and watch the constant comings and goings of goods and people from around the world. Having completed your tour of the central harbour of Piraeus you will then head south traversing the peninsula and arrive at Peiraiki, one of the most picturesque neighbour hoods in the city. Here one finds the harbour of Zea, one of the largest marinas in the Mediterranean. If the night finds you in the area, you can try one of the many bars found nearby. You can continue your tour along the waterfront heading towards Kastella but a small deviation toward the city centre will be useful for then you can visit the verdant square of the municipal Theatre with cafeterias and shops of all kinds surrounding it. The magnificent building housing the Municipal Theatre as well as the Town Hall and the Library complete the picture presented by the main square in the city. Piraeus's little natural harbours are among its busiest and most touristy areas: Mikrolimano, Passalimani, Zea, Freatida and Hatzikiriakio. Countless seaside tavernas provide delicious seafood washed down with the uniquely Greek drink, ouzo. The fresh smell of the sea and the sounds made by the assortment of caiques, yachts and sailing ships, which are moored next to the tables, complete the enjoyment of the food Beyond the port, the most impressive spots are the hills of Profitis Ilias and Kastela with their neoclassical mansions and modern buildings which look as they are hanging over the sea.

Onboard the Seven Seas Voyager

Costco Member Reviews

4.7 of 5 stars4.7/5 (131 Reviews)

Ship Rating

4.5/5

A trailblazer in the exclusive world of all-suite, all-balcony ships, Seven Seas Voyager® exceeds even the loftiest expectations for luxury. Considering her size, the amenities are surprisingly plentiful and include four main dining venues where you can dine wherever, whenever and with whomever you choose. With 447 international crew members attending to a maximum 700 guests, personal service is exceedingly indulgent throughout.

Onboard Activities

Activities & Services (included in cruise)

Fitness Center

  • Card Room
  • Disco/Nightclub
  • Movies
  • Fitness Center
  • Sauna/Steam Room
  • Educational Programs
  • Pool - Outdoor
  • Sports Facilities
  • Whirlpool/Jacuzzi
  • Bars/Lounges
  • Library
  • Wi-Fi
  • Organized Age Specific Activities
  • Teen Programs
  • Business Center
  • Concierge Desk
  • Dry Cleaning/ Laundry Service
  • Duty-Free Shops/Boutiques
  • Elevators

Activities & Services (available for an extra fee)

Full-Service Spa

  • Beauty Salon
  • Full-Service Spa
  • Infirmary/Medical Center

Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the cruise line without notice. Staterooms designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Dining

Compass Rose

Specialty Dining

Chartreuse: Featuring a classic French menu with a modern twist, Chartreuse evokes memories of a chic Parisian fine dining restaurant discovered during an evening stroll. Wherever you are seated in this regal restaurant, you will be treated to a succulent dinner while enjoying incredible ocean views. The restaurant ambiance is complemented by a menu that features dishes expertly prepared using both classic and modern techniques for a multiple course celebration of French gastronomy.

Compass Rose: Much thought was given to the design of Compass Rose, the flagship restaurant of Regent Seven Seas fleet. The dining room is outfitted with rich woods contrasted by light marble stones and mother of pearl shimmering brightly with an elegant color theme of light shades of blue, white, gold and silver. Compass Rose delights with a beautifully defined atmosphere and transitions from refreshing natural light during the day to a romantic ice blue lighting theme at night. This is the perfect setting for you to enjoy your breakfast, lunch and dinner, where the menu features an exceptional variety of Continental cuisine.

Prime 7: A true classic in every sense, Prime 7 sets a new standard in steakhouse fare with its contemporary interpretation of an American favorite. Handsomely decorated with supple leather wing-back chairs, burnished woods and rich earth-toned fabrics, Prime 7 exudes a distinct, intimate elegance. All the traditional starters are here, including Jumbo Lump Crab Cakes, Classic Steak Tartare, and Clam Chowder. Of course, beef is the undisputed star, and it is all USDA Prime and Dry-Aged at least 28 days to ensure the ultimate tenderness, juiciness and flavor. Prime New York Strip, Porterhouse Steak and succulent Filet Mignon only touch upon the selections. Mouthwatering alternatives include Alaskan King Crab Legs and Dover Sole. Prime 7 is open for dinner only and reservations are required.

Sette Mari at La Veranda: Each evening, La Veranda transforms into Sette Mari at La Veranda, a casual, intimate dining experience. Enjoy an extensive menu of authentic antipasti and Italian specialties served á la carte and paired with fine Italian wines — complimentary of course. Delectable dishes are prepared á la minute by talented chefs using only the freshest gourmet ingredients and served by attentive waiters. Sette Mari at La Veranda is open for dinner only.

 

Casual Dining

La Veranda Restaurant: Take in stunning ocean views while enjoying elegant breakfast and lunch buffets in the chic indoor dining room or al fresco on the shaded, open-air deck. Breakfasts include traditional favorites, as well as a made-to-order omelet station, a variety of fresh fruits and pastries, along with daily specials, like fluffy Belgian waffles with fresh blueberry compote. For lunch indulge in an array of choices from a bountiful salad bar, gourmet sandwiches, hot carving stations and delicious desserts.

Pool Grill: The Pool Grill is open-air, yet abundantly shaded for comfortable dining. Enjoy grilled-to-order burgers, grilled seafood, sandwiches, and fresh salads. Treat yourself to milkshakes and malts or an old-fashioned hand-dipped ice cream dessert sprinkled with all your favorite toppings.

Room Service: Complimentary 24-hour dining in the comfort of your stateroom.


Times, costs and other specifics are outside the control of Costco Travel. All information is at the sole discretion of the cruise line and is subject to change without notice. Dining time and table size preferences are submitted to the cruise line on a first-come, first-served request basis and are confirmed aboard ship. Questions, concerns and/or special needs regarding dining arrangements must be addressed with the maitre d' hotel aboard ship. Every effort is made to accommodate travelers' preferences; however, Costco Travel cannot guarantee dining arrangements. In specialty restaurants, space is limited and reservations are recommended. A cover charge and dress code may apply.

Staterooms

Features a European king-size bed, a sitting area, a marble bathroom, a walk-in closet and a balcony. Concierge Level is available.

Deluxe Suite (Category: H)

Category: H
356 sq.ft.; 306 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Deluxe Suite (Category: G)

Category: G
356 sq.ft.; 306 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Deluxe Suite (Category: F)

Category: F
356 sq.ft.; 306 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Spacious suites feature an in-suite iPad, daily canapés and upgraded bathroom amenities.

Penthouse Suite (Category: A)

Category: A
Penthouse Suites include Butler Service; 370 sq.ft.; 320 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Penthouse Suite (Category: B)

Category: B
Penthouse Suites include Butler Service; 370 sq.ft.; 320 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Penthouse Suite (Category: C)

Category: C
386 sq.ft.; 306 sq.ft.; Balcony: 115-198 sq.ft.

Concierge Suite (Category: D)

Category: D
356 sq.ft.; 306 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Concierge Suite (Category: E)

Category: E
356 sq.ft.; 306 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Master Suite (Category: MS)

Category: MS
2 bedrooms; Master Suites include Butler Service; 1335 sq.ft.; 1152 sq.ft.; Balcony: 183 sq.ft.

Grand Suite (Category: GS)

Category: GS
Butler service; 876 sq.ft.; 753 sq.ft.; Balcony: 123 sq.ft.

Voyager Suite (Category: VS)

Category: VS
Voyager Suites include butler service; 604 sq.ft.; 554 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Seven Seas Suite (Category: SS)

Category: SS
Seven Seas Suites include Butler Service; 545 sq.ft.; 495 sq.ft.; Balcony: 50 sq.ft.

Deck Plan

Cruise Ship
Deck 12
Key to Symbols
SymbolDescription
Three guest capacity suite, convertible sofa bedThree guest capacity suite, convertible sofa bed
Wheelchair accessible suites have shower stall instead of bathtubWheelchair accessible suites have shower stall instead of bathtub
Connecting suitesConnecting suites
2-bedroom suite accommodates up to 6 guests2-bedroom suite accommodates up to 6 guests

Ship Facts

Seven Seas Voyager ship image
  • Ship Name: Seven Seas Voyager
  • Year Built: 2003
  • Year Refurbished: 2016
  • Year Entered Present Fleet: 2008
  • Ship Class: Mariner
  • Maximum Capacity: 700
  • Number of Passenger Decks: 9
  • Number of Crew: 447
  • Officers' Nationality: International
  • Tonnage (GRT): 42,363
  • Capacity Based on Double Occupancy: 700
  • Country of Registry: The Bahamas
  • Total Staterooms: 350
  • Suites with Balcony: 350
  • Crew/Hotel Staff Nationality: European/International
Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the hotel, resort or cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the provider without notice. Hotels, resorts, ships or accommodations designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Reviews

Available Dates & Prices

Departure Date

Inside Stateroom

Ocean View Stateroom

Balcony Stateroom

Suite Stateroom

Departure Date - 03/25/2025

Inside Stateroom

N/A

Ocean View Stateroom

N/A

Balcony Stateroom

$42,399

Suite Stateroom

$48,599

Terms & Conditions

*Price shown is per person based on double occupancy, is valid for select stateroom categories only, and does include government taxes/fees and gratuities. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for details.

**Select complimentary shore excursions are for full-fare guests only, capacity controlled and subject to availability. Shore excursion reservations are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. Please note, available excursions vary by sailing date and day of the week. Government fees and taxes are included. Requested excursions may not be available at time of booking. Supplement will apply on Regent Choice excursions and excludes Private Arrangements and all Adventures Ashore programs. Restrictions apply and penalties apply 36 hours prior to shore excursion start date.

††All shipboard credit is in U.S. dollars, is per stateroom based on double occupancy, has no cash value, is nontransferable and not redeemable for cash.

†The exact amount of the Costco Shop Card will be calculated during the booking process. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for additional information.

Ship's registry: The Bahamas

    Package ID: RSSVOYWOR20250325